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IMPORTANT TOPICS

1. U.S. NEWS MEDIA CAN LEGALLY LIE TO YOU
There is no law preventing the U.S. news media from intentionally lying to the public. Whistle blowers and honest reporters are fired for telling the truth.

2. FLUORIDE IS A TOXIN/POISON
Read the Poison Warning label on your toothpaste, then call the 800# and ask;
"Why do you put poison in my toothpaste?"

3. NEW FLU VACCINE IS LOADED WITH MERCURY
by Dr. Joseph Mercola

4. PEDOPHILES IN HIGH PLACES
Also: Conspiracy of Silence Video

5. ASPARTAME IS HARMFUL
Equal, Nutra-Sweet and over 6000 food and beverage products contain Aspartame

6. On September 10, 2001, Donald Rumsfeld held a press conference to disclose that over $2,000,000,000,000 (2 Trillion) in Pentagon funds could not be accounted for.
Such a disclosure normally would have sparked a huge scandal. However, the commencement of the [9/11] attack on the World Trade Center and The Pentagon the following morning would assure that the story remained buried.


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> RECORD HEAT


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Posted: Jul 27 2006, 02:04 PM
Quote Post
As of this posting, the death toll in California is at 81 from the intense heat.

Note: No lingering contrails have been observed in my area for many many weeks.

QUOTE
Heatwave in France kills 40
SA
25 July 06
QUOTE
Paris - About 40 people have died as a result of high temperatures during a heatwave in France in the past two weeks, said a French public health body on Tuesday.

The number of deaths directly attributable to the heatwave was "about 40", said the head of the national institute for public health surveillance (InVS), Gilles Brucker.

The last update from InVS - a government body responsible for monitoring public health issues in France - had put the number of deaths at about 30.

The latest heatwave, which has seen temperatures approach 40°C in some areas, has revived memories of a devastating bout of baking temperatures in 2003 that killed about 15 000 people in France.

http://www.news24.com/News24/World/News/0%...73166%2C00.html





QUOTE
Heat Causes Pileup of Livestock Carcasses
By OLIVIA MUNOZ
Associated Press
26 July 06
QUOTE
FRESNO, Calif. (AP) -- The state's record-setting heat wave has killed thousands of dairy cows and other livestock, leaving farmers with piles of carcasses and creating a backup at factories that turn the dead animals into pet food.

A combination of sweltering temperatures, growth in the state's dominant $5 billion dairy industry and fewer plants to properly dispose of the animals have forced several counties to declare a state of emergency.

The declarations allow dead livestock to be dumped in landfills - something usually outlawed because of health risks.

"But what can we do? We have to weigh the possible contamination to ground water versus piles of dead cows stinking and attracting flies," said Phil Larson, chairman of the Fresno County Board of Supervisors.

The heat wave, with 10 straight days of 100-degree temperatures, brought the threat of more rolling blackouts and raised the number of suspected heat-related deaths to at least 56. Cooler weather was not expected until Wednesday.

Fresno County, which reached 113 degrees in recent days, was one of the first to declare an emergency when a plant that handles the bulk of the region's dead animals broke down earlier this month.

After the old carcasses began decomposing in the searing summer heat, county officials were forced to make the declaration - the first in the county's history, Larson said.

"It wasn't any easy solution," he said. "It's not something we want to continue but we can't have piles of dead animals laying around."

Dairy farmer Brian Pacheco said he sometimes waits days before a rendering plant will pick up his dead cows.

"And when they do come, they only take the ones that died that day," said Pacheco. "I'm left with the old bodies."

Pacheco has spent thousands of dollars to build shade structures and install misters and fans in his barns to keep his cows cool, measures that have yielded higher milk production and fewer lost cattle than other area farmers.

But he said he still sees 15-20 cows die each year from the heat, and this year it could be more.

San Joaquin County, which also has declared an emergency, estimated that its dairy farms were losing a total of 120 cows per day from the heat. Individual dairy farmers could lose about 2 percent of their herd this year, according to industry experts. Hundreds of thousands of chickens and turkeys also have died.

The state Environmental Protection Agency issued guidelines earlier this month for farmers stuck with dead livestock.

Farmers can have them hauled to a landfill by licensed handlers or compost their animals on their property by burying them in manure, which is common in other states.

Usually, farmers in California take their dead animals to rendering plants, but many have closed amid odor complaints from growing communities nearby, accusations by environmentalists and lawsuits stemming from improper disposal.

© 2006 The Associated Press.

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/D/DEA...-07-26-03-19-01




--------------------
QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Jul 27 2006, 11:15 PM
Quote Post
QUOTE
Europe heatwave sparks disruptions, fire fears
By Karin Strohecker
Reuters
Wed Jul 26, 2006
QUOTE

BERLIN - A deadly heatwave gripping central Europe has raised fears of forest fires in Poland, sent electricity prices rocketing in Germany and caused the suspension of shipping on major rivers as water levels dwindle.

"This will probably be the hottest July for Germany since our nationwide records began in 1900," said German meteorologist Gerhard Mueller-Westermeier from national weather service DWD.

The service said Wednesday's forecast sweltering temperatures of 37 degrees Celsius (99 Farenheit) could be matched on Thursday, extending a heatwave which has continued since the soccer World Cup began early last month.

"It has been going on pretty much non-stop since June 10," said Mueller-Westermeier. "It's far too warm and too dry in a lot of parts of Germany."

Shipping on the river Elbe -- which also runs through the Czech Republic and Poland -- was stopped as water levels dropped nearly 1 meter (yard) to around 95 centimeters in Germany.

"No cargo shipping is possible," said Herbert Dorf, a senior official at the Water and Shipping Bureau in Magdeburg.

There is a similar situation with the Oder river, which forms a stretch of the border between Germany and Poland.

Some nuclear power plants operating with river water cooling systems had to cut electricity output by up to 40 percent said Ivo Banek, spokesman for energy firm Vattenfall.

In order to protect their fragile ecosystems, rivers in Germany have limits on how warm water returning from power stations can be. Hotter rivers also mean soaring electricity prices, Banek said.

"There is no danger of a physical lack of electricity in Germany, but prices on the wholesale market have rocketed by 500 percent over the past weeks," he said.

In neighboring Poland, fire and forest services said they had put 90 percent of the country on the top level of fire alert. Some southern districts have begun imposing limits on daily water usage, appealing to local residents to stop watering their gardens or washing cars.

"The suspicion is that some people are putting the welfare of their tomatoes first," one local mayor told the TVN news channel. "As a result in 10 days or so they may not have water to wash dishes or shower."

Experts also warned that food prices were set to rise as reports of crop failing amid the sweltering heat intensified.

A leading food industry group said Europe's shops and supermarkets are facing a shortage of vegetables later this year as a result of the current heatwave.

According to OEITFL, which represents Europe's fruit and vegetable processing industry, shop owners must prepare for the likelihood of empty shelves, fridges and freezers.

"The position is reminiscent of the catastrophic year 1976 when a comparable lack of rain was registered which now leaves them with less production than anticipated under normal weather conditions," said Susanne Meyer, OEITFL secretary general.

The heat wave has already taken its human toll. Some 40 people died over the past week in France and dozens more were killed by the scorching temperatures in the United States.

In the Netherlands, human resources firm Arbo Unie, which monitors 2.2 million workers in the country, said sick rates are 7.5 percent higher than last year due to the heat.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060726/wl_nm/...urope_heat_dc_1




--------------------
QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Jul 30 2006, 07:17 AM
Quote Post
In So Calif, we've had a slight reprieve from the intense heat lately with a cool onshore flow and a marine layer lowering temperatures.
WHEW!

Can you imagine how bad it would be without air-conditioning?
(Which BTW adds to furthur global warming --- we all contribute to our own demise by using polluting energy.)

I hope that one day, the people will wake up and demand clean renewable energy.


QUOTE
Three-week heatwave claims 64 lives in France
PARIS, July 27, 2006 (AFP)
QUOTE
France and Italy on Thursday reported new victims of a lethal heatwave that has engulfed Europe for the last two weeks, bringing the total death toll to more than 80 people.

High temperatures persisted in northern Italy, Germany and southeast Europe, but forecasters predicted that spreading storms and rain would bring respite to many areas of the baking continent.

Rain would come as welcome relief to farmers, who in many countries have reported withering crops, and would also help boost perilously low water levels.

The French health-monitoring authority InVS updated the death toll in France to 64, from a previous estimate of 40, and the heat was also blamed for a further three deaths in the north of Italy.

This year, there has been no repetition of the massive loss of life caused by the last major heatwave in 2003 when in France alone 15,000 people died.

Factors such as greater awareness, slightly lower temperatures and preventative action by governments to protect the elderly are thought to have helped limit the number of deaths.

The director of the French InVS health monitoring body, Gilles Brucker, warned that the number of deaths could rise in France, even though wet weather lowered temperatures across most of France on Thursday.

Separately on Thursday, French weather office Meteo-France announced that July had been the hottest month on record, on average three to four degrees Celsius above the norm.

In Italy, a victim was found dead in his apartment in Padua and two elderly people also died, one in his garden near Padua and the other in north Lombardy during a walk to cool down.

Italian Agriculture Minister Paolo de Castra called the heatwave "dramatic" in an interview with newspaper La Repubblica and authorities have estimated the damage to the country's agricultural sector at about 500 million euros (637 million dollars).

Figures showing the fall in water levels in Italy were also cause for concern.

The level of the River Po, which runs across the north of Italy, fell by seven centimetres (2.8 inches) on Wednesday at one measuring station.

On Wednesday, French Environment Minister Nelly Olin had warned that groundwater levels in the Paris region were at their lowest level in 20 years and said that water restrictions were in place for nearly half of the country.

"It needs to rain without storms. That would be the ideal situation but I don't think we're there yet today," she told French television channel France 2.

In Germany, temperatures were back above 30 degrees Celsius on Thursday, after storms the night before, and a motorway was closed after concrete sections cracked and lifted in the heat.

The A5 highway near the western city of Frankfurt was set to undergo emergency repairs overnight Friday after pieces of the surface lifted 20 to 30 centimetres.

Temperatures in Germany were expected to reach 38 degrees Celsius in some parts on Thursday before cooling over the weekend when more storms were forecast.

On Wednesday night, storms above Paris led to the diversion of three Air France planes to Lille airport in the north of the country and caused 152 emergency incidents attended by the Paris fire service.

Farmers in France, the Netherlands, Poland, and Latvia have all warned about the impact of the heat on their harvests this summer.

On Thursday, a leading mushroom expert in the Czech Republic raised the alarm, saying that one of the nation's favourite hobbies, picking mushrooms, was being endangered by the drought.

"The situation is really very bad," expert Miroslav Smotlacha told the news agency CTK.

About two thirds of Czech people are thought to pick wild mushrooms on a fairly regular basis, but this year a lack of rain has stunted growth of the edible fungi.

In France, there was also a warning that the heat had hit lavender plantations, the fragrant crop that forms part of the identity of the Provence region in southeast France.

Maryse Milesi, head of the National Federation of Lavender Producers, said that crops would be 10-30 percent lower than normal in the southeast.

In Spain, where nine people have died so far from the heat, temperatures fell by two to five degrees Celsius on Thursday, particularly in the north where storms and rain were expected.

http://www.expatica.com/source/site_articl...lives+in+France



Deaths in Calif are well over 125 now.


QUOTE
Heat-Related Deaths Climb in California
By JENNIFER STEINHAUER
The New York Times
July 27, 2006
QUOTE
FRESNO, Calif. - A searing heat wave in its second week has been responsible for more than 100 deaths across California, the authorities said, with the coroner's office here forced to double-stack bodies.

Thousands of livestock are also dying from the intense heat. Dairy farmers are using sprinkler systems and shaded barns to try to keep the cows cool.

Most of the deaths were reported in the land-locked Central Valley, the agricultural spine of the state where triple-digit temperatures have been the norm. At least 22 deaths in Fresno County, where funeral homes have offered to help with the backlog at the coroner's office, have been linked to the heat.

"We're just trying to catch up," said Joseph Tiger, a deputy coroner in Fresno. "I have been here 10 years and I have never seen it this bad. Our boss has been here over 20 and he hasn't seen it this bad either. For the last two weeks it has just been unbearable hot."




The governor's Office of Emergency Services said that statewide 53 of the people were confirmed dead by coroners as a result of the heat; the others were presumed to have died from heat-related causes pending autopsies, said Roni Java, a spokeswoman for the office.

Among the dead here was a 38-year-old worker found in a field, an unidentified man around 40 who made it to a hospital emergency room where his body temperature was recorded at 109.9 degrees and a 58-year-old man who was found drunk, officials said. Statewide, Ms. Java said, the youngest heat-related death was a 20-year-old man from San Diego and the eldest a 95-year-old man in Imperial County, near the Mexican border.

A doctor and his assistant toiled here on Thursday in the cornor's office, a building that was fashioned from a converted eye glass factory several years ago with no air conditioning in the key areas. Decomposition has been a problem, said Loralee Cervantes, the Fresno coroner, and bodies have piled up because of the lack of space.

"This has been our biggest challenge," Ms. Cervantes said in an inteview. "It's frustrating."

Many of the suspected heat deaths were among the elderly, who often live as shut ins and will not open windows, she said. The morgue went from 25 to 50 beds recently after getting a bioterrorism grant and rarely has had 25 bodies. On Thursday morning there were 58.

While the Central Valley is used to temperatures crackling in the triple digits this time of year, the evenings tend to be cooler. But with temperatures lingering in the 80s after sunset, mixed with humidity far higher than this region is accustomed to, misery, power shortages and death have followed.

Midday Thursday the mercury had hit 112 in Fresno, though temperatures elsewhere had dropped and weather forecasters were predicting a break in the heat most everywhere in the state by Friday.

In a statement, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger promised that state workers were doing everything possible to prevent additional deaths.

"The summer heat wave continues to be dangerous as California has seen record-breaking, consecutive days of triple-digit temperatures," Mr. Schwarzenegger said. "A mobilized force of local workers will continue to knock on doors and make phone calls to protect our vulnerable residents who may be exposed to the relentless heat."

The record temperatures have also hit the state's farmers hard, with roughly one percent, or 16,500 cows, of the state's dairy herd dying from the heat, according to California Dairies, the state's largest milk cooperative. Further, panting, miserable cows have lowered their milk production between 10 and 20 percent, said trade groups and dairy farmers in the region. California is the largest milk producing state in the country, producing about 12 percent of the country's milk supply, according to trade groups.

Because of the large number of dead cows, the California Department of Food and Agriculture waived a regulation requiring dead animal haulers to transport animals to rendering plants in eight counties in the Central Valley - freeing them to put animals in landfills.

Six counties have declared states of emergencies because of the backlog of dead livestock.

"It is just a bad, bad situation," said Larry Collar, the quality assurance manager for California Dairies. "In 25 years in southern California, this is the most extreme temperatures we have ever seen and the most extreme length of time we have seen."

The high temperatures have also caused problems with field crops around the state.

"We have been having trouble mainly in the Central Valley with the walnuts," said Ann Schmidt-Fogarty, a spokeswoman for the California Farm Bureau. "The intensity of the sun and heat actually burns them inside the shell."

She said that delicate fruits like peaches, nectarines and plums are also ripening unevenly, causing further crop damage.

"Our biggest concern is our people," Ms. Schmidt-Fogarty said. "We make sure they are very hydrated and some are working half days."

At the Te Velde dairy farm in Bakersfield, about 100 miles south of here, 16 cows have perished over the last 11 days, when temperatures hovered well over 100 degrees daily, and 12 more were sent to slaughter because they could not handle the heat, said Ralph Te Velde, 59, who has run his family farm for three decades.

The remainder of his 1,600 cows sought relief under a patch of water misters Thursday morning, and by 9:30 a.m. some were already showing the telltale signs of distress, their fat pink tongues hanging dangling to their chin.

One cow, her five-minute-old baby being licked by a neighboring sow a few feet away, was being hosed down by Mr. Te Velde's son. At the end of the lot was a pile of dead cows, their bodies in a twisted black and white mass.

Mr. Te Velde and other dairy farmers have struggled to get rendering companies to come and get dead livestock. "The main challenge is a disposal challenge in the Central Valley," said Steve Lyle, a spokesman for the California Department of Food and Agriculture.

Mr. Te Velde said his farm usually generates 72 pounds of milk daily per cow, but is now to about 60 pounds this week. He estimates the state may be losing 1.5 million pounds of milk a day.

"The question is, how many farmers can survive this," he said. "You never want to lose animals. We are trying to mist them and mitigate this, keep them happy and what not."

While cows are better accustomed than humans to manage cold temperatures, the heat is not their friend.

"The double whammy for cows," Mr. Collar said, "is that lose heat through their mouth when they breathe, but don't have sweat glands so are unable to dissipate heat. The other thing is that they are ruminant which means they have multi compartment stomach and have bacteria that breaks down food, and that bacteria generates heat."

Dino Giacomazzi, a dairy farmer in Hanford - which sits between Fresno and Bakersfield - said he has been watching Yahoo weather for days, hoping to see the last of the heat.

"We spend a lot of time and money making sure these cows are comfortable all the time," he said. "Because uncomfortable cows don't make milk."

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/27/us/27cnd...serland&emc=rss




--------------------
QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Aug 2 2006, 07:31 AM
Quote Post
QUOTE
California heat wave claims up to 126 lives
AFP
Fri Jul 28, 2006
QUOTE
LOS ANGELES - Up to 126 people have died due to the stifling heat wave that has seared California in the last two weeks, the state government said.

Officials confirmed 69 deaths and autopsies are being conducted to confirm 57 other cases believed to be related to the extreme heat, said Roni Java, a spokesman in Governor
Arnold Schwarzenegger's Office of Emergency Services.

Up to 88 men and 38 women have died, Java said in a statement. The youngest victim was 20 years old and the oldest 95.

The emergency services said three Mexicans succumbed to the heat after illegally crossing the southern border. The border patrol and the Mexican consulate told AFP four migrants had died, however.

The high temperatures also killed about 25,000 cattle and 700,000 fowl in central California.

Temperatures have surpassed 40 C (104 F) in several parts of the state, and soared to a record 48 C (118 F) west of Los Angeles on Saturday.

Authorities say the state had not seen such high temperatures in 57 years. The temperatures fell back to their seasonal norm on Friday.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20060729/ts_af...ll_060729003225




--------------------
QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Aug 30 2007, 02:32 PM
Quote Post
Asphalt parking lots and asphalt streets increase air temperatures as they release their stored up heat from the day.

Nope... humans cannot change the weather or air temperatures... nope...not at all.
QUOTE
Phoenix Arizona to Set Heat Record: 29 Days of 110+ degrees Robert Roy Britt
LiveScience.com
29 Aug 2007
QUOTE
The forecasted high here today is 111 degrees. If the mercury hits that mark, the city will set a record for the most days in a year above 110 degrees, at 29.

The record was tied yesterday when the high hit 111.

The new mark is the pinnacle of a stark trend. The average number of 110+ days in Phoenix has climbed from 6.7 per year in the 1950s to 21.6 per year so far this decade.

Heat island

The urban heat island is partly to blame, said Tony Haffer, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service office in Phoenix. Concrete, pavement and buildings retain more heat than the natural landscape. That heat is released slowly, causing morning temperatures to be about - ballpark estimate, Haffer said - 5 degrees warmer in the city.

Afternoon highs are less influenced by the heat island, but are likely warmer than they would be, Haffer said in a telephone interview, adding that the issue needs more study.

The lack of monsoon rains this summer has played a role, too.

The monsoon is a seasonal shift in wind that brings more moisture into Arizona, triggering severe thunderstorms and forcing temperatures down. Serious monsoons occur in India and in much of Mexico (Acapulco averages 51.8 inches of rain during its summer monsoon and just 3.3 inches the rest of the year). Phoenix is on the northern fringe of the Mexican monsoon, and this year, it's been beyond the fringe much of the summer.

Phoenix gets about 7 inches of rain a year, and about a third of that comes during the monsoon. But this year, amid a 12-year drought, the city is already 2.4 inches below normal. The lack of summer rains have allowed heat to rule.

What is normal?

Another factor: "The term 'normal' does not adequately describe our typical weather," Haffer said. "Rather, in a desert, we experience wide shifts in the weather, from very hot to not so hot."

Reliable climate records in the United States go back just a century, so records of all sorts are bound to be broken frequently for decades to come. Breaking a record like Phoenix's number of hot days "is to be expected in a climate where extremes are common," Haffer said.

Finally, studies have suggested that global warming, while not fueling such dramatic numbers globally as what Phoenix has seen, will lead to more extreme weather events. One prediction: An extreme, 90-year drought for the American Southwest.

So does global warming have anything to do with this year's record heat in the Valley of the Sun?

"It is impossible to determine the impact of the warming of the global atmosphere relative to a given point on Earth," Haffer said. So: maybe, mabye not.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/livescience/200708...cord29daysof110




--------------------
QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Sep 6 2007, 02:18 PM
Quote Post
According to my local news medias, this year, only 28 people have died in Southern California over the past 8 days during an intense heat wave that had daytime temperatures reaching 116F.

It felt like I was in Las Vegas, Lake Havasu Arizona or Palm Desert. It was just like walking into an oven if you stepped outside. Overnight, it did not cool down for several days with temps in the high 80sF all night long.

15,000 So Cal Edison customers were without power for a few days.




--------------------
QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Master Of His Domain
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Posted: Feb 2 2009, 05:14 PM
Quote Post
QUOTE
Record-breaking heat scorches southern Australia
By PAUL ALEXANDER
QUOTE
MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — Southern Australia suffered Friday from a record-breaking heat wave that has threatened rural towns with wildfires and sent ambulance crews after heat-stressed patients.

Melbourne, Australia's second-largest city recorded its third consecutive day of temperatures above 43 degrees Celsius (109 F) for the first time since 1855, when record-keeping began, the Bureau of Meteorology said.

The temperature in Melbourne topped 45.1 C (113 F) on Friday ahead of a cooler change that might even bring some thunder showers, the bureau said.

Adelaide, the other major city on the south coast, is expected to match its longest heat wave in a century by Monday, with six consecutive days exceeding 40 C (104 F). The heat there buckled train and tram lines.

The high temperatures have afflicted tennis players and spectators alike this week at the Australian Open in Melbourne, where men's No. 3 seed Novak Djokovic retired ill from a game Tuesday after heat-related complaints.

The retractable roofs on Rod Laver Arena have been closed at least parts of the last three days.

There was controversy Wednesday when they closed the roof during the match between Serena Williams and Svetlana Kutzetsova. The Russian had won the first set, but the break gave Williams time to recover and she rallied to win.

Players complained that it felt like their feet were burning right through their shoes. A bunch of moths that have annoyed the players were basically sizzling and dying within seconds of landing on the broiling court surface.

Melbourne is the capital of Victoria state, where three rural towns were under threat from wildfires spreading quickly in the furnace-like conditions, Country Fire Authority deputy chief fire officer Geoff Conway said.

Bureau of Meteorology forecaster Richard Carlyon said firefighters will have to wait for rain to dampen the tinder-dry conditions.

State ambulance service chief Greg Sassella said more crews to help people affected by the heat were available on Friday, a day after 1,305 emergency cases were logged — more than double the normal load.

Ambulance services in Adelaide and Melbourne said they were not aware of any deaths caused by the heat.

Associated Press Writer Rod McGuirk in Canberra, Australia, contributed to this report.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/articl...c90jhAD961GMEO0




--------------------
QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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