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1. U.S. NEWS MEDIA CAN LEGALLY LIE TO YOU
There is no law preventing the U.S. news media from intentionally lying to the public. Whistle blowers and honest reporters are fired for telling the truth.

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3. NEW FLU VACCINE IS LOADED WITH MERCURY
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4. PEDOPHILES IN HIGH PLACES
Also: Conspiracy of Silence Video

5. ASPARTAME IS HARMFUL
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6. On September 10, 2001, Donald Rumsfeld held a press conference to disclose that over $2,000,000,000,000 (2 Trillion) in Pentagon funds could not be accounted for.
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> Retreating Glaciers Worry Greenlanders


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Posted: Sep 12 2005, 01:34 AM
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Retreating Glaciers Worrying Greenlanders
Sunday, September 11, 2005
QUOTE
ILULISSAT, Greenland - The gargantuan chunks of ice breaking off the Sermeq Kujalleq glacier and thundering into an Arctic fjord make a spectacular sight. But to Greenlanders it is also deeply worrisome.

The frequency and size of the icefalls are a powerful reminder that the frozen sheet covering the world's largest island is thinning - a glaring sign of global warming, scientists say.

"In the past we could walk on the ice in the fjord between the icebergs for a six-month period during the winter, drill holes and fish," said Joern Kristensen, a fisherman and one of the indigenous Inuit who are most of Greenland's population of 56,000.

"We can only do that for a month or two now. It has become more difficult to drive dog sleds because the ice between the icebergs isn't solid anymore."

In 2002-2003, a six-mile-long stretch of the Sermeq Kujalleq glacier broke off and drifted silently out of the fjord near Ilulissat, Greenland's third largest town, 155 miles north of the Arctic Circle.

Although Greenland, three times the size of Texas, is the prime example, scientists say the effects of climate change are noticeable throughout the Arctic region, from the northward spread of spruce beetles in Canada to melting permafrost in Alaska and northern Russia.

Indigenous people, who for centuries have adapted their lives to the cold, fear that even small and gradual changes could have a profound impact.

"We can see a trend that the fall is getting longer and wetter," said Lars-Anders Baer, a political leader of Sweden's Sami, a once nomadic, reindeer-herding people.

"If the climate gets warmer, it is probably bad for the reindeer. New species (of plants) come in and suffocate other plants that are the main food for the reindeer," he said.

Rising temperatures are also a concern in the Yamalo-Nenets region in Western Siberia, said Alexandr Navyukhov, 49. He is an ethnic Nenet, a group that lives mostly off hunting, fishing and deer-breeding.

"We now have bream in our river, which we didn't have in the past because that fish is typical of warmer regions," he said. "On the one hand it may look like good news, but bream are predatory fish that prey upon fish eggs, often of rare kinds of fish."

Melting permafrost has damaged hundreds of buildings, railway lines, airport runways and gas pipelines in Russia, according to the 2004 Arctic Climate Impact Assessment commissioned by the Arctic Council, an intergovernmental body.

Research also shows that populations of turbot, Atlantic cod and snow crab are no longer found in some parts of the Bering Sea, an important fishing zone between Alaska and Russia, and that flooding along the Lena River, one of Siberia's biggest, has increased with warming temperatures.

In Greenland, Anthon Utuaq, a 68-year-old retired hunter, worries that a warmer climate will make it harder for his son to continue the family trade.

"Maybe it will be difficult for him to find the seals," Utuaq said, resting on a bench in the east coast town of Kulusuk. "They will head north to colder places if it gets warmer."

Arctic sea ice has decreased by about 8 percent, or more than 380,000 square miles, over the past 30 years.

In Sisimiut, Greenland's second largest town, lakes have doubled in size in the last decade.

"Greenland was perceived as this huge solid place that would never melt," said Robert Corell of the American Meteorological Society, a Boston-based scientific organization. "The evidence is now so strong that the scientific community is convinced that global warming is the cause."

How much of it is natural and how much is caused by humans burning fossil fuels is sharply debated. Greenland itself endured sharp climate shifts long before fossil fuels were an issue, and sustained Norse settlements for 400 years until the 15th century.

"We know that temperatures have gone up and it's partly caused by man. But let's hold our horses because it's not everywhere that the ice is melting. In the Antarctic, only 1 percent is melting," said Bjoern Lomborg, a Danish researcher and prominent naysayer on the magnitude of the global-warming threat.

What is clear is that the average ocean temperature off Greenland's west coast has risen in recent years - from 38.3 degrees Fahrenheit to 40.6 F - and glaciers have begun to retreat, said Carl Egede Boeggild, a glaciologist with the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, a government agency.

The Sermilik glacier in southern Greenland has retreated nearly seven miles, and the Sermeq Kujalleq glacier near Ilulissat is also shrinking, said Henrik Hoejmark Thomsen of the geological survey.

In 1967, satellite imagery measured it moving 4.3 miles per year. In 2003, the rate was 8.1 miles.

"What exactly happened, we don't know. But it appears to be the effect of climate change," said Hoejmark Thomsen.

In August, the National Science Foundation's Arctic System Science Committee issued a report saying the rate of ice melting in the Arctic is increasing and within a century could for the first time lead to summertime ice-free ocean conditions.

With warmer temperatures, some bacteria, plants and animals could disappear, while others will thrive. Polar bears and other animals that depend on sea ice to breed and forage are at risk, scientists say, and some species could face extinction in a few decades.

The thinning of the sea ice presents a danger to both humans and polar bears, said Peter Ewins, director of Arctic conservation for the World Wildlife Fund Canada.

"The polar bears need to be there to catch enough seals to see them through the summer in open warm water systems. Equally, the Inuit need to be out there on the ice catching seals and are less and less able to do that because the ice is more unstable, thinner," he said.

When NASA started taking satellite images of the Arctic region in the late 1970s and computer technology improved, scientists noted alarming patterns and theorized that the culprit was gases emitted by industries and internal combustion engines to create a "greenhouse effect" of trapping heat in the atmosphere.

Inuit leaders are trying to draw attention to the impact of climate change and pollution.

"When I was a child, the weather used to be more stable. It worries me to see and hear all this," Greenland Premier Hans Enoksen said on the sidelines of a meeting of environmental officials from 23 countries in Ilulissat. The meeting ended with statements of concern- and no action.

The Kyoto Protocol that took effect in February aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. But the 140 nations that have signed the pact don't include the United States, which produces one-quarter of the gases.

The Bush administration says participation would severely damage the U.S. economy. Many scientists say that position undermines the whole planet and they point to Greenland as the leading edge of what the globe could suffer.

"Greenland is the canary in a mine shaft alerting us," said Corell, the American meteorologist, standing on the edge of the Sermeq Kujalleq glacier which he is studying. "In the U.S., global warming is a tomorrow issue. ... For us working here, it hits you like a ton of bricks when you see it."

---

AP writers Maria Danilova and Jim Heintz in Moscow, Karl Ritter in Stockholm, Sweden, and Beth Duff-Brown in Toronto contributed to this report.

http://home.peoplepc.com/psp/newsstory.asp...050911256122754


Here's an article that states glacial activity will increase.

QUOTE
Scientists Confirm Unexpected Gulf Stream Slowing
June 23, 2005
QUOTE
We need to concentrate on cleaning up our problems here on Earth so future generations can inherit a world worth living in...

Scientists from Cambridge University have confirmed that the Gulf Stream is weakening, and this is likely to bring much colder temperatures to Europe within a few years. The weakening is significant: the Gulf Stream is flowing at a quarter of the strength that was present five years ago.

This is happening because gigantic chimneys of cold water that were sinking from the surface to the sea bed off Greenland have disappeared. These chimneys are the key engine of world climate as we know it today, and their disappearance signals the beginning of a great catastrophe. There will be a special report about this important story on this week's Dreamland!

This is the first research to show unequivocal evidence of the phenomenon, which was originally predicted in the Coming Global Superstorm, published in 1999.

In Superstorm and in the film based on it, the Day After Tomorrow, the event unfolds over the course of a week. The Cambridge scientists are predicting now that there will be clear water at the North Pole as early as 2020, and that temperatures in Britain are likely to drop by 5-8 degrees Celsius, from an average of 22 at present to 14 to 17 in the future. An average as low as 17 (62 Fahrenheit) will mean that the summer growing season will be catastrophically curtailed in Europe, leading to huge declines in production from one of the world's primary surplus production zones.

It will also mean that winters similar to those in Finland will extend far south into France, and that there is a possibility that a series of "no-melt" summers across the northern latitudes could cause the reflectivity of the planet to increase to the point that new glaciation will begin.

The weakening of the Gulf Stream is destabilizing currents worldwide, and will lead to radical climate changes in other areas. The nature of these changes is not known, and the current US administration has blocked US environmental agencies from studying the phenomenon, so the severity of its effect in this country is not under study. However, it is likely that the eastern US and eastern Canada will experience climate change as radical as that in Europe, as the Gulf Stream drops south. At the least, food production and liveability in the eastern half of North America will be severely challenged.

Scientists are currently assuming that the Gulf Stream will slow and stop over a period of years, not suddenly, as predicted in Superstorm and portrayed in the Day After Tomorrow.

However, there is ample evidence that sudden and extreme changes have taken place worldwide in the past. Unknowncountry.com reported on this phenomenon in December of 2004 and earlier in November of 2003.

There is a mechanism that changes a process of climate change that seems to be unfolding over a period of years into a violent event that takes just hours or days to develop, and then remains in a radically changed condition. This happened 5,200 years ago, as has amply been revealed in the fossil record.

Why it happened remains unknown, but it certainly had to do with the very sort of spiking of temperatures that the world has experienced over the past fifty years, and a reversal.

The changes that are taking place in the Gulf Stream are unstoppable. They will unfold. How that will happen, and whether or not the process will involve sudden and violent worldwide storms such as those that took place 5,200 years ago remains unknown.

It is, however, essential that planning for the change begin at once. At the least, the world faces dramatic economic upheavals and a decline in food production at a time when both energy and food needs are at the highest they have ever been in history.

So far, the only other media outlet that has picked up this story is the Sunday Times of Great Britain, and they have not provided the true perspective, or discussed the scale of the changes that are on their way.

We need to concentrate on cleaning up our problems here on Earth so future generations can inherit a world worth living in, before The Day After Tomorrow arrives. Read the novella based on the hit movie!

http://www.unknowncountry.com/news/print.phtml?id=4595


I'd say the evidence of the vanishing glaciers is overwhelming, but according to the experts, this can change and we can expect a new ice age.

QUOTE
Visitors Rush To Glimpse Vanishing Glaciers
QUOTE
Attention Turns To Alaska Where Climate Change Is Transforming The Landscape

By Dan Glaister in Los Angeles
The Guardian - UK
8-22-5

The four distinguished visitors looked on in awe at the sight before them. Exit Glacier in Alaska's Kenai Fjords national park is one of continental America's most imposing monuments, and last week it was at its most impressive - a hulk of ice and snow imperceptibly making its way toward the sea.

But lately that movement has quickened, a fact that will not have been lost on visitors. One of the most popular tourist attractions in Alaska, Exit Glacier has receded 300 metres (1,000ft) in the past 10 years. The movement means that the viewing platform from which the group of dignitaries surveyed the glacier would have been under several feet of ice just a few years ago. Today it is on dry land.

The four VIPs included an unlikely couple, both probable presidential candidates in 2008, both plausible winners, and from opposite ends of the political spectrum.

One was John McCain, Vietnam veteran and republican senator from Arizona. The other was Hillary Rodham Clinton, White House veteran and New York senator. That they should choose to visit Alaska together in order to investigate climate change raised a few eyebrows. Rupert Murdoch's Fox News even hinted, in jest, that the two were having an affair.

But, despite the political barbs, the senators had a serious purpose. Soon the issue of climate change - often code for global warming - was back on the national political agenda.

Mr McCain, who has sponsored a climate stewardship bill with the Democratic senator Joe Lieberman, said: "The question is how much damage will be done before we start taking concrete action. Go up to places like we just came from. It's a little scary."

Melting glaciers is only one of Alaska's problems. As Kate Troll, an environmentalist writing in the Anchorage Daily News, put it earlier this month: "Besides retreating glaciers, insect infestations and more intense forest fires, Alaska is experiencing melting permafrost, flooded villages, warming oceans, coastal erosion, shifts in bird and wildlife populations, and shorter seasons for ice roads. And there is more to come, as Alaska is heating up at twice the rate of the rest of the world."

Last year was the warmest summer on record for much of Alaska. An Arctic Climate Impact Assessment report published in November 2004 said Alaska's average annual temperature rose 3.3C between 1949 and 2003. Some areas have risen twice that much.

A further report published in March noted that the average temperature in the Arctic had risen by 0.4C a decade since the mid-1960s. The study reported that the last decade was the warmest since records began, and that the current warming in the Arctic was without precedent since the last ice age.

All of which has prompted a mini tourist boom, a "catch-it-while-you-can" attitude among visitors eager to see the glaciers while they are still there. This year, Alaska is set to beat the 1.45 million tourists of 2004.

Many tourist centres are making the most of the bad news, regaling visitors with video presentations bearing titles such as Glimpses of an Ice Age Past.

One of the best known and most visited Alaskan glaciers, Muir Glacier, named after the pioneering environmentalist John Muir, has retreated five miles in the past 30 years. Another, Portage Glacier, is retreating at a rate of 50 metres a year and is no longer visible from its visitor centre.

In December, a geologist with the US Geological Survey presented a series of photographs of glaciers taken in the first four years of this century, alongside pictures taken up to a century before.

The result showed not just the retreat of glaciers but the spread of vegetation where once there was merely ice.

"You don't need science to prove the point," Matt Nolan of the University of Alaska told the American Geophysical Union, where the pictures were unveiled.

"This evidence is visual, and it's real. All the glaciers in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge are retreating from their most extended positions thousands of years ago, and the only scientific explanation for their retreat is a change in climate."

The key question - preoccupying everyone from senators with an eye on the White House, to tourists with an eye on their holiday snaps - is what is to blame. Is it global warming or is it merely part of the planet's climate cycle?

The Republican senator Lindsey Graham, a member of the VIP group visiting Alaska last week, called for politicians to put aside their differences and deal with the problem.

"Climate change is different when you come here, because you see the faces of people experiencing it in Alaska," he said. "If you can go to the native people and listen to their stories, and walk away with any doubt that something's going on, I just think you're not listening."

Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2005

http://www.guardian.co.uk/climatechange/st...1553726,00.html




--------------------
QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Sep 12 2005, 10:28 PM
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Climate change melts away Canada's last big mass
Gregory Pucel
9/12/2005
QUOTE
WARD HUNT ISLAND, Nunavut -- Three years after a huge crack split one of Canada's last remaining ice shelves in half, scientists have found fresh evidence that global warming is splintering the mass of ice.


The Ward Hunt Ice Shelf is a cold and foreboding place at the edge of
the earth, about 3,500 kilometres north of Edmonton. But its edges are
quickly being erased as climate change rapidly alters Ellesmere Island, Canada's northernmost landmass.

The ice shelf is a 450-square-kilometre ledge that's 25 metres thick and reaches up into the Arctic Ocean from the mouth of Ellesmere Island's Disraeli Fiord. It surrounds Ward Hunt Island, which at 83 degrees north lies at the very tip of land in the Americas.

In 2002, Derek Mueller, a PhD student at Laval University, was studying
bacteria on the shelf when he discovered an enormous crack along its
entire length.

The crack had destroyed the shelf's structural integrity and had drained a unique freshwater lake once hemmed in by the ice. The following two years produced few changes, but when he returned again this summer, Mueller discovered another sizable crack on the northern edge of the ice sheet.

"As far as we can tell it's nine kilometres long," he says.

"This is a crack that is several metres wide. The pieces of ice that
have cracked off are ready to float away but they haven't yet because
they're held in."

In total, the ice island that has fractured off amounts to about four
square kilometres. That's small compared to Ward Hunt's best-known ice
island. T-3, also known as Fletchers Ice Island, was 90 square
kilometres and used as a floating research station from 1952 to 1978.

Still, the new crack whittles away another piece of the 3,000-year-old
ice shelf, which has lost 90 per cent of its mass in less than a
century. Scientists say the rapid decrease makes it a clear signal of
Arctic climate change, and are worried that as it melts the unique
ecosystem of ice-nourished bacteria that it supports is also disappearing.

When Robert Peary explored the top of Ellesmere Island in 1906, he
travelled mostly across what was then the Ellesmere Island Ice Shelf,
which at the time covered about 8,900 square kilometres, the size of
Puerto Rico.

Less than a century later, that unified shelf has splintered into five
separate shelves, of which Ward Hunt is the largest -- the last
remaining ice shelves in Canada. Altogether, they now comprise just 900 square kilometres, twice the size of the island of Montreal, and growing smaller by the year.

"I would say the days are numbered for this ice shelf," Mueller says.
"If the trend continues, the writing is on the wall. We're going to have more warming in the future. Within our lifetimes it could quite possibly go. Certainly within our children's lifetimes."

An ice shelf is a region of ice that extends over water and stands at
least two metres thick above the surface. What makes the Ward Hunt shelf so susceptible to climate change is that it is not fed by glaciers, and forms primarily as water beneath it freezes to its bottom.

That process has slowed and the shelf has been thinning, losing an
estimated 15 metres in thickness since the 1980s. The loss has been
spurred on by temperatures in the area, which have risen by an average
half-degree a decade since the 1970s. Researchers say the next 100 years could bring an additional four to seven degrees -- more than double the expected rise in the rest of the world.

Scientists studying the permafrost on Ellesmere Island this year have
said it is at its lowest level in 15 years. Some have predicted that
2005 could be the warmest ever in the Arctic.

Paul Rask is a Twin Otter pilot with Kenn Borek Air, and has flown
across the vast stretches of the Arctic archipelago for 30 years.
Stopping to refuel the aircraft at Eureka, a high Arctic weather station a stone's throw from the 80th parallel, his boots slide across streaks of mud that have formed as permafrost beneath the gravel strip melts in the 24-hour sunshine.

"This year by appearance it may be just a little bit warmer than
normal," Rask says of the muck. "It's something we gotta live with."

Environment Canada's statistics show just how warm this summer has been.

The annual mean temperature of Eureka in August is 2.6 degrees. So far
this year, the mean has been 7.6 degrees.

Effects of higher temperatures are apparent throughout the northern part of Ellesmere. On the shores of Lake Hazen, the world's largest lake entirely north of the Arctic Circle, each week brings fresh dark stains where once-frozen permafrost banks have turned to wet mud and slumped down to the water. The lake itself often remains ice-covered all the year. This summer, the wind blew off the last bits of ice on July 23.

Tanquary Fiord, a deep inlet on the western coast of the island, is also ice-free, as are many of the other fiords that cut into Ellesmere.

At the Quttinirpaaq National Park station at the head of the fiord, an
outdoor thermometer has risen to 38 this month in the sunshine.

Behind the camp, the Macdonald River, which drains an eponymous ice cap
nearby, has turned into a chocolate-coloured torrent as it rages toward the sea with a load of sediment. Flowing fast with meltwater, the river has begun to undercut some of its banks, which are growing close to collapse.

Forty per cent of Quttinirpaaq park is ice-covered year-round, but the
glaciers and ice caps in nearby hills are thinning. The sparse life that populates the rugged landscape is also showing change.

"We've noticed the flowers are blooming earlier in the year than they
normally would, so definitely there are indications that things are
warming up here," says Vamini Selvanandan, a doctor who is living in the park this summer with her husband, the park manager.

This is not the first time that Quttinirpaaq, an Inuktitut word loosely
translated as "top of the world," has seen warm temperatures. Dotted
through the park are piles of rocks once used as food caches and fox
traps by nomads who lived here 3,800 years ago, when it was warm enough to more easily sustain life.

Parts of Ellesmere and nearby Axel Heiberg Island also contain mummified stumps and logs, the remnants of forests that grew at this latitude 45 million years ago, when temperatures were substantially warmer than they are today.

But Mueller says what makes modern warmer temperatures different is that they are clearly linked to human activities, which have layered the atmosphere with greenhouse gases.

"We are doing this to the climate -- the carbon dioxide content keeps going up," he says.

"It's not whether it was warm 45 million years ago and there were
forests on Axel Heiberg. It's an ethical question: do we have the right as human beings to affect the planet on such a grand scale as to change the climate?"




--------------------
QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Sep 12 2005, 10:50 PM
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List of Earth Changes at: http://www.fromthestars.com/page177.html


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Posted: Sep 12 2005, 11:32 PM
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Thank you Guest, that is a real eye opener.

From your link....

user posted image



user posted image



user posted image

http://www.fromthestars.com/page177.html




--------------------
QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Sep 13 2005, 10:57 PM
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"Thank you Guest, that is a real eye opener."

I thought you'd you'd like these images Pupp, did I just hear the wind whisper "come to OZ" lol.gif

WALKINGREDDRAGON.GIF sun.gif


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Posted: Sep 13 2005, 11:52 PM
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Hi Earthbound, yes those images were very revealing, thank you for sharing them.

Whatya mean -- there ain't no such thing as global warming!

QUOTE
did I just hear the wind whisper "come to OZ"


shhh, not so loud, someone might hear ya!




--------------------
QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Sep 16 2005, 02:01 PM
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QUOTE
Global warming 'past the point of no return'
By Steve Connor, Science Editor
The Independent
Published: 16 September 2005
QUOTE
A record loss of sea ice in the Arctic this summer has convinced scientists that the northern hemisphere may have crossed a critical threshold beyond which the climate may never recover.

Scientists fear that the Arctic has now entered an irreversible phase of warming which will accelerate the loss of the polar sea ice that has helped to keep the climate stable for thousands of years.

They believe global warming is melting Arctic ice so rapidly that the region is beginning to absorb more heat from the sun, causing the ice to melt still further and so reinforcing a vicious cycle of melting and heating.

The greatest fear is that the Arctic has reached a "tipping point" beyond which nothing can reverse the continual loss of sea ice and with it the massive land glaciers of Greenland, which will raise sea levels dramatically.

Satellites monitoring the Arctic have found that the extent of the sea ice this August has reached its lowest monthly point on record, dipping an unprecedented 18.2 per cent below the long-term average.

Experts believe that such a loss of Arctic sea ice in summer has not occurred in hundreds and possibly thousands of years. It is the fourth year in a row that the sea ice in August has fallen below the monthly downward trend - a clear sign that melting has accelerated.

Scientists are now preparing to report a record loss of Arctic sea ice for September, when the surface area covered by the ice traditionally reaches its minimum extent at the end of the summer melting period.

Sea ice naturally melts in summer and reforms in winter but for the first time on record this annual rebound did not occur last winter when the ice of the Arctic failed to recover significantly.

Arctic specialists at the US National Snow and Ice Data Centre at Colorado University, who have documented the gradual loss of polar sea ice since 1978, believe that a more dramatic melt began about four years ago.

In September 2002 the sea ice coverage of the Arctic reached its lowest level in recorded history. Such lows have normally been followed the next year by a rebound to more normal levels, but this did not occur in the summers of either 2003 or 2004. This summer has been even worse. The surface area covered by sea ice was at a record monthly minimum for each of the summer months - June, July and now August.

Scientists analysing the latest satellite data for September - the traditional minimum extent for each summer - are preparing to announce a significant shift in the stability of the Arctic sea ice, the northern hemisphere's major "heat sink" that moderates climatic extremes.

"The changes we've seen in the Arctic over the past few decades are nothing short of remarkable," said Mark Serreze, one of the scientists at the Snow and Ice Data Centre who monitor Arctic sea ice.

Scientists at the data centre are bracing themselves for the 2005 annual minimum, which is expected to be reached in mid-September, when another record loss is forecast. A major announcement is scheduled for 20 September. "It looks like we're going to exceed it or be real close one way or the other. It is probably going to be at least as comparable to September 2002," Dr Serreze said.

"This will be four Septembers in a row that we've seen a downward trend. The feeling is we are reaching a tipping point or threshold beyond which sea ice will not recover."

The extent of the sea ice in September is the most valuable indicator of its health. This year's record melt means that more of the long-term ice formed over many winters - so called multi-year ice - has disappeared than at any time in recorded history.

Sea ice floats on the surface of the Arctic Ocean and its neighbouring seas and normally covers an area of some 7 million square kilometres (2.4 million square miles) during September - about the size of Australia. However, in September 2002, this dwindled to about 2 million square miles - 16 per cent below average.

Sea ice data for August closely mirrors that for September and last month's record low - 18.2 per cent below the monthly average - strongly suggests that this September will see the smallest coverage of Arctic sea ice ever recorded.

As more and more sea ice is lost during the summer, greater expanses of open ocean are exposed to the sun which increases the rate at which heat is absorbed in the Arctic region, Dr Serreze said.

Sea ice reflects up to 80 per cent of sunlight hitting it but this "albedo effect" is mostly lost when the sea is uncovered. "We've exposed all this dark ocean to the sun's heat so that the overall heat content increases," he explained.

Current computer models suggest that the Arctic will be entirely ice-free during summer by the year 2070 but some scientists now believe that even this dire prediction may be over-optimistic, said Professor Peter Wadhams, an Arctic ice specialist at Cambridge University.

"When the ice becomes so thin it breaks up mechanically rather than thermodynamically. So these predictions may well be on the over-optimistic side," he said.

As the sea ice melts, and more of the sun's energy is absorbed by the exposed ocean, a positive feedback is created leading to the loss of yet more ice, Professor Wadhams said.

"If anything we may be underestimating the dangers. The computer models may not take into account collaborative positive feedback," he said.

Sea ice keeps a cap on frigid water, keeping it cold and protecting it from heating up. Losing the sea ice of the Arctic is likely to have major repercussions for the climate, he said. "There could be dramatic changes to the climate of the northern region due to the creation of a vast expanse of open water where there was once effectively land," Professor Wadhams said. "You're essentially changing land into ocean and the creation of a huge area of open ocean where there was once land will have a very big impact on other climate parameters," he said.

http://news.independent.co.uk/world/scienc...ticle312997.ece




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Posted: Nov 18 2005, 05:00 PM
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People living in low lying coastal areas will be severely affected as ocean levels rise.

But what can we do?

Use clean energy?

But India and China, which contain over 2 billion people, will continue to burn oil and coal even if western nations stop.

So I think we'll need a good ole fashioned Earth cleansing to reduce the strain on Earth caused by the virus known as humans.

Perhaps future generations will learn from our mistakes and ignorance.




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"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
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Posted: Nov 18 2005, 08:18 PM
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Hello Pupp, I do believe in global warming and the issues to help heal the atmosphere must be addressed. The pictures posted earlier by VPF is a real eye opener.

I was an Earth Science major in college and the topic of global warming came up frequently.
The earth has ways of repairing itself, and when it does, the consequence is deadly. For example, the evidence of greenhouse effect is the trigger to the record breaking number of hurricanes in the Atlantic.
The atmosphere is intertwined with the other elements giving way to the shift in the magnetic poles and the melting of the glaciers in areas that should be frigid. The hole in the stratosphere the ozone layer, has a hole that is growing due to the release of flurocarbons into the atmosphere. (I don't have the article to post, lost it when my computer crashed a while ago.) The ozone layer is loosing it's ability to filter out the harmful rays of the sun, thus giving into global warming in part.

All other replies welcome. theendisnighNEW.gif


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Posted: Nov 19 2005, 06:27 PM
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Hi,

Interesting pictures. Mount Kilamanjaro latest one was in 2000. All snow should be gone now... although, this mountain is sooo far away from the artic, that I assume that this has nothing to do with global warming as a global event.

I've read that due to the removal of several forest areas on the slopes and nearby fields, the wind-patterns were changed in such away that the temperature at the top was rising.

what seldom is discussed is the "holistic" point of view of global warming:

-Dr. Emoto has shown us that water has awarness and memory
-studies of ancient cultures has shown that these cultures got information/communication directly from plants about the edibility and/or medicinal value. (there was no "field-guide" in those days).

These two issues (and there will be probably a lot more) show us that the earth really is alive, aware and point to some existing "gaia" or whatever it is that makes it alive.

If all those awarenesses combine (gaia, plants, water, animals and even a lot of us) and feel the threat of existance, it would be very ignorant to think nothing would happen. Throw in a couple of alien races and we have soup that almost boils over to destroy the very kitchen in which it was made!

wake up!!! bouncefire.gif bouncefire.gif bouncefire.gif


rn.




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Posted: Nov 22 2005, 12:23 PM
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Millions face glacier catastrophe
Robin McKie, science editor
Sunday November 20, 2005
The Observer
QUOTE
Global warming hits the Himalayas

Nawa Jigtar was working in the village of Ghat, in Nepal, when the sound of crashing sent him rushing out of his home. He emerged to see his herd of cattle being swept away by a wall of water.

Jigtar and his fellow villagers were able to scramble to safety. They were lucky: 'If it had come at night, none of us would have survived.'

Ghat was destroyed when a lake, high in the Himalayas, burst its banks. Swollen with glacier meltwaters, its walls of rock and ice had suddenly disintegrated. Several million cubic metres of water crashed down the mountain.

When Ghat was destroyed, in 1985, such incidents were rare - but not any more. Last week, scientists revealed that there has been a tenfold jump in such catastrophes in the past two decades, the result of global warming. Himalayan glacier lakes are filling up with more and more melted ice and 24 of them are now poised to burst their banks in Bhutan, with a similar number at risk in Nepal.

But that is just the beginning, a report in Nature said last week. Future disasters around the Himalayas will include 'floods, droughts, land erosion, biodiversity loss and changes in rainfall and the monsoon'. [...]

'A glacier lake catastrophe happened once in a decade 50 years ago,' said UK geologist John Reynolds, whose company advises Nepal. 'Five years ago, they were happening every three years. By 2010, a glacial lake catastrophe will happen every year.'

http://observer.guardian.co.uk/internation...1646656,00.html


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Posted: Nov 29 2005, 04:51 PM
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Ocean front property will one day take on a whole new meaning!




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Posted: Nov 29 2005, 05:56 PM
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It is already too late.

I think that those people who feel they don't have to do anything about global warming, "because they will be dead before it happens and they can leave the issues for the next generations", are in for a rude shock.

Those people who think that clean energy will solve the problem are also due for a shock. Capitalism will not permit large use of clean energy because it makes too much money from from dirty energy.

Those people who think that stopping greenhouse gases will show an immediate improvement are also in for a shock. It will take this planet thousands of years to clean up what is already in the atmosphere even if greenhouse emissions were stopped cold now.
There is some evidence to suggest that greenhouse is in runaway mode already and if this is so, it will take the planet tens of thousands of years to clean up the human debris.

Should the north atlantic conveyor stop, then the foodbowl of middle Europe and Scandinavia will have a much reduced growing season and will not be able to feed its own population let alone have a surplus.
Recent ice core and mud sample data shows that the conveyor is very fragile and has stopped many times in the past with little provocation. Many of the stops have been short-lived, probably due to a rapid build up of ice when it does stop, but even a few years would have a disastrous effect on the whole world because of the catastrophe in Europe.

The oil pipeline from Alaska is supported on metal piles which are, in turn, supported by permafrost. Should this permafrost melt, the pipeline will sag and rupture. Capitalism will react then. Not to do anything about GW but to repair the pipeline so that its fossil fuels can continue to contribute to GW.

Without the extended snowmelt in the Himalayas, countless people who rely on long-term river flows will have to move to survive. Many of the most important rivers in the world start in the Himalayas. If their flows are reduced, the human impact will be savage.
Which countries will permit millions of food refugees to settle? I think none.

Think what happens should the monsoon stop. About 1.5 Billion people rely on the monsoon for their food. Fortunately, the monsoon appears to be penetrating further from the equator (at least in the southern hemisphere) and this could open up lands which are currently desert for cropping.

Think also of the US economy. The US economy relies on the rest of the world for its viability. Without the input of raw materials and the markets to sell products, the US economy will stall. While this will have a large impact on all the subsidiary economies, the largest impact will be on the US standard of living. No more SUV's, central heating and junk food five times a week. No more "put it on the credit card". The US will have to revert to the gold standard to maintain financial credibility.
My advice - buy gold now. I know it is at its highest level for hundreds of years but that is because other people are taking precautionary steps already. Make sure no one knows you have gold because possession of gold may be made an offence when it hits the fan.

The major food-for-export countries can do so only because their agriculture is totally reliant on cheap energy. Should GW interfere with the supply of that cheap energy, then much of the world's food supply will stop. The western world would need to revert to nineteenth century growing technology to grow anything at all. I doubt that even Australia with its wide open cropping lands and small population could feed itself under nineteenth century conditions. What happens to those countries who already rely on Oz grain supplies? They won't get it from other countries because they will struggle with 19th century technology also.

As a species we've had decades to identify the problem and to make structural and technological changes but we have chosen to take the grasshopper route of ennui and inaction. I think we are about to pay for our collective laziness.

As I've said before, we are in for one wild ride - HANG ON.






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Posted: Nov 29 2005, 08:47 PM
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Hi uggliozzi, yep, I'm sure you are right. Even if we stopped burning fossil fuels this very moment, the damage has already been done, but by continuing the changing of the air of Earth, we ensure that the changes will be more traumatic.

QUOTE
The US will have to revert to the gold standard to maintain financial credibility.


There's one problem with that idea.

The US has very little gold left. Fort Knox is basically empty and the gold was sold by the criminal thieves who have taken over America from within and drained its treasury.

America is broke - bankrupt, and in so much debt, there is no way out....

Unless we abolish the federal reserve and start printing up US treasury notes again like JFK did just before he was murdered.

user posted image

But, if the world is going to end soon, or life as we know it, then we shouldn't care about the economy... which is EXACTLY what THEY want!

I believe that these radical Earth changes are being helped along by the same beings who gave us "portions" of the bible. THEY seek to fulfill the biblical prophecies of their ancestors.

JMHO, I could be wrong!




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~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
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Posted: Feb 1 2006, 03:05 PM
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Studies back fears sea levels are rising rapidly
Matthew Denholm
February 01, 2006
QUOTE
THE world's worst fears about global warming and rapid sea-level rise will be realised or exceeded, according to two new reports.

Australian climate change research published yesterday found the average level of the oceans had risen 19.5cm since 1870 and the rate was increasing.

The study provides the first evidence of a 20th-century acceleration in sea-level rise and supports predictions the world's oceans will rise 31cm above 1990 levels by 2100.

A separate report released in Britain paints an ever more alarming picture, suggesting ice sheets may be melting, raising the prospect of sea levels rising by 5m over several centuries.

British Prime Minister Tony Blair said the research clearly showed that "the risks of climate change may well be greater than we thought".

"It is now plain that the emission of greenhouse gases, associated with industrialisation and economic growth from a world population that has increased six-fold in 200 years, is causing global warming at a rate that is unsustainable," Mr Blair writes in a foreword to the research.

Published in the report Avoiding Dangerous Climate Change, it warns of large-scale disruption if temperatures rise above 3C - within the range of climate change models for this century.

The author of the Australian research, internationally renowned CSIRO chief research scientist John Church, said it was now clear there would be significant sea-level rise without major changes to human behaviour. "Clearly, sea-level rise will be reported in metres unless we have a substantial decrease in greenhouse gas emissions," Dr Church told The Australian.

He said his study, conducted with CSIRO scientist Neil White using data from tide gauges and satellite measurements, vindicated sea-level rise projections by the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

"Although predicted by models, this is the first time a 20th-century acceleration has actually been detected."

The study concludes that sea levels rose an average 16cm during the 20th century, with a rough year-on-year increase of 1.7cm.

It finds that sea level rise began during the first half of the 19th century, when global sea level was about 20cm below current levels. A comparison of sea-level benchmarks carved in rock on the Isle of the Dead, near Port Arthur in Tasmania in 1840, and the height of ancient Roman fish tanks, indicated little sea level increase until 1800.

The study, part of Australia's Climate Change Science Program, is likely to be considered at the IPCC's global climate change assessment next year.

The British research, based on a forum of scientists at Exeter last February, includes a warning from British Antarctic Survey head Chris Rapley that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet may be starting to melt.

Scientists believe the melting of the ice sheet would eventually raise sea levels around the world by 5m.

"The last IPCC report characterised Antarctica as a slumbering giant in terms of climate change. I would say it is now an awakened giant," Professor Rapley writes. "There is real concern."

The report warns a delay of even five years in reducing greenhouse gas emissions "could be significant".

The federal Opposition said the findings highlighted the need for Australia to sign the Kyoto Protocol.

http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/commo...5e30417,00.html




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Climate Change Report shows scientists' real fear
By Peter Wadhams
London Times
31 Jan 06
QUOTE
THE report Avoiding Dangerous Climate Change brings out very clearly just how fast scientific worries about climate change have accelerated, propelled by a new fear — the “tipping point” when change becomes irreversible.

We have already reached one such point in that we cannot go back to a system with no climate change. We know that carbon dioxide continues to act climatically for about 100 years, so if we went back to the Stone Age tomorrow we would still experience another century of warming.

But there are further tipping points where subsystems break down; for example, the Gulf Stream slowing because less cold water is sinking at high latitudes. Eventually a point is reached where the whole climate-regulating system breaks down, producing changes that can never be reversed.

Just recently, for instance, it was realised that as carbon dioxide levels rise the oceans become more acidic and that this will destroy plankton, especially plankton with shells, which absorb and reduce carbon levels. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concluded in 2001 that the rate of global warming is about one third faster than previously suspected.

It predicted that by the end of this century there will be an average warming of between 2C (3.6F) and 5C, with devastating consequences.

The next IPCC assessment is due, and the new fear is that runaway change could soon be upon us, whatever we do.

Peter Wadhams is Professor of Ocean Physics at Cambridge University

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-2017321,00.html




QUOTE
British scientists warn Greenland ice cap headed for meltdown
Radio New Zealand
30 Jan 06
QUOTE
Scientists advising the British Government have warned the world appears to be on a path to causing the Greenland ice cap to melt.

A report published by the Department for the Environment says many of the risks associated with climate change are more serious than previously thought.

It says there is only a small chance of greenhouse gas emissions being kept below "dangerous" levels.

And it says it fears the Greenland ice sheet is likely to melt, leading sea levels to rise by 7 metres over 1,000 years.

The report, "Avoiding Dangerous Climate Change", collates evidence presented by scientists at a conference hosted by the UK Meteorological Office in February 2005.
NASA greenhouse gas expert says US tried to silence him

NASA's top climate scientist says the Bush administration has tried to stop him from speaking out on the threat of greenhouse gases.

The director of NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies, James Hansen, made the claim in an interview with the New York Times newspaper.

He's quoted as saying officials at the space agency's headquarters ordered a review of his lectures, papers, and website postings.

It followed his lecture in December calling for prompt reductions in emissions of greenhouse gases.

A NASA spokesperson has denied any effort to silence Mr Hansen, but says the restrictions apply to all staff that could be seen speaking for the agency.

http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/bulletins/ra...302135/13ddcec1






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~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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