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The theories, conclusions and commentaries are presented in an attempt to reveal the hidden truths.
It is up to the viewer to determine what they choose to believe after evaluating all available sources of information.

 
     

NO TAXATION WITHOUT REPRESENTATION
Does your government represent your best interests?


     
 
"Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter."
~ Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.



POLITICAL ART GALLERY



IMPORTANT TOPICS

1. U.S. NEWS MEDIA CAN LEGALLY LIE TO YOU
There is no law preventing the U.S. news media from intentionally lying to the public. Whistle blowers and honest reporters are fired for telling the truth.

2. FLUORIDE IS A TOXIN/POISON
Read the Poison Warning label on your toothpaste, then call the 800# and ask;
"Why do you put poison in my toothpaste?"

3. NEW FLU VACCINE IS LOADED WITH MERCURY
by Dr. Joseph Mercola

4. PEDOPHILES IN HIGH PLACES
Also: Conspiracy of Silence Video

5. ASPARTAME IS HARMFUL
Equal, Nutra-Sweet and over 6000 food and beverage products contain Aspartame

6. On September 10, 2001, Donald Rumsfeld held a press conference to disclose that over $2,000,000,000,000 (2 Trillion) in Pentagon funds could not be accounted for.
Such a disclosure normally would have sparked a huge scandal. However, the commencement of the [9/11] attack on the World Trade Center and The Pentagon the following morning would assure that the story remained buried.


http://drinkingwaterlosangeles.com
Serving the greater Los Angeles area,
Los Angeles Drinking Water is proud to offer Reverse Osmosis filtration systems
that remove trace elements such as arsenic, mercury, lead and fluoride
which are known to be in Los Angeles tap water according to
the 2013 DWP Water Quality report.
POLITICAL ART GALLERY









"If our nation is ever taken over, it will be taken over from within."
~ James Madison, President of the United States

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> Tips for Green Living, Union Of Concerned Scientists


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Posted: Jan 29 2005, 04:10 PM
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QUOTE
Dear Mark,
As an active member of the UCS Action Network, we thought you might want to read a sample issue of Greentips, our free monthly e-newsletter that suggests ways for incorporating your environmental principles into your daily life. A recent issue is attached below.
http://www.ucsaction.org

What to Do with Old Electronics

Rapid advances in technology come with a price: the equally rapid pace of obsolescence. The average lifespan of a computer, for example, will have dropped from 4.5 years in 1992 to approximately two years by 2005.

As a result, "e-waste"--discarded computers, TVs, cell phones, and other electronics--comprises one to four percent of the municipal solid waste stream, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. What's worse, this equipment is often made from non-renewable resources and contains hazardous chemicals including lead, chromium, cadmium, and mercury.

Here are some ways you can cut down on this e-waste:

Buying

Before you buy replacement technology, assess your current equipment. Can you improve your computer's performance with a memory or video card upgrade? Do you need a cell phone with all the newest features when your old one works just fine? Is it worth buying a new portable CD player if you eventually want an MP3 player?

Choose a product that has all the features you will need for the foreseeable future, has space to add components such as memory if needed, or takes the place of two separate gadgets (for example, you could consolidate equipment by buying a cell phone with integrated personal organizer, or a printer with integrated scanner or fax).

Purchase used or refurbished electronics (but be aware that these products might not come with a warranty).
Reusing

Before discarding obsolete electronics, find out whether a local repair shop, electronics training program, or even a technologically inclined friend or family member could use it for parts or practice.

Consider donating used electronics to a nonprofit organization or school. Some organizations, for example, reprogram used cell phones for emergency use by senior citizens or victims of domestic violence. Computers that are less than five years old should be donated through an electronics refurbisher (see the link below), who will clean out old files and software and ensure all of the components are running properly. Computers that are more than five years old should be recycled, since software and technical support for older systems is difficult to find.
Recycling

General electronics: Many cities and towns now offer electronics recycling as part of their household hazardous waste collection program. Contact your local public works department to find out what equipment it will accept and on what days; some charge a small fee per item.

Computers: If your town does not accept computers, look for a commercial recycler that can break down and distribute usable components and dispose of the rest properly (see the links below).

Cell phones: Many cell phone manufacturers and service providers will take back used phones for reuse or recycling.

If you liked this issue, subscribe to Greentips today.

For more information:

EPA--ECycling
http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/hazwaste/recycle/ecycling/

High Tech Goes Green
http://www.futurenet.org/article.asp?id=596

Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition
http://www.svtc.org/

Computer Take Back Campaign
http://www.computertakeback.com/

Ten Tips for Donating a Computer
http://www.techsoup.org/products/recycle/a...m?ArticleId=524

MAR Refurbishers
https://www.techsoup.org/mar/mars.asp

Electronic Industries Alliance--Cell Phone Recycling and Donation Programs
http://www.eiae.org/whatsnew/news.cfm?ID=100

EPA--Computer Take Back Options
http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non-hw/reduce/.../computers.html

Recycling Resources
http://www.cio.com/archive/041503/tl_resources.html

Electronic Industries Alliance--National Database of Reuse and Recycling Programs
http://www.eiae.org/




--------------------
QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Hoss the SURVIVER
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  Posted: Jan 29 2005, 07:32 PM
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HI ALL
There is not to much of anything that is new here. Tiz all funcional, eve the pigstickers on the wall.
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MONGERAL & WORKIN AT IT
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THERE ARE FOUR KINDS OF PEOPLE IN THE WORLD....

THOSE THAT LIKE YOU FOR THE RIGHT REASONS
THOSE THAT LIKE YOU FOR THE WRONG REASONS
THOSE THAT DON'T LIKE YOU FOR THE WRONG REASONS
THOSE THAT DON'T LIKE YOU FOR THE RIGHT REASONS

IT IS ONLY THE LAST GROUP YOU NEED TO WORRY ABOUT

So go tell me DOGS

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Minister Of Information
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Posted: Jan 29 2005, 08:35 PM
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Hi,

problem: anything which operates on a lithium-ion battery has the battery-life problem. These batteries live only about two years. Used or not, charged a lot, or not, it still has an unchanged life-time (or not much). So when buying a new phone/gadget whatever, first check if the l-ion battery is already on the market. Buy only that 2nd battery after the first is worn out.

This is for phones for sure, however, I own a palm vx organizer which I bougth 4 or 5 years ago. the L-I battery still lasts for upto 3 weeks.... so there are exceptions....

my two cents,

rn




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"Being controlled is for the Ignorant"
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  Posted: Jan 30 2005, 03:34 PM
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HI ALL
Another two cents worth

Tips for Sustainable Living


Ecosystems everywhere are under the siege of a careless or apathetic human population. It need not be that way. Each one of us can make simple changes in how we live towards a more sustainable relationship with our environment. The key to reducing the assault on the earth's fragile ecosystems is to decrease our demand for resources. Clean air and water, forests and other wild landscapes are not infinite. By driving less, making less trash, eating lower on the food chain, and being responsible earth citizens in other ways, we become less burdensome to the environment.

On the other hand, by nurturing the environment we actually become positive forces for creation. I would like to share some simple, concrete tips my family and I have discovered to live lightly on the earth. I sincerely hope others will join us in this endeavor. We would also love to hear some of your favorite ways to do the same!

Turning garbage into black gold

Do you ever let the garbage company take away your yard waste and other compostables? Then you're losing a really valuable earth-enhancing resource. There really isn't much work involved in turning grass clippings, tree prunings, weeds, kitchen scraps, and other vegetation "waste" into rich fertilizer. Worm boxes are one great way to do this. Another way is composting. Both are fun ways to get back in touch with one of nature's most amazing processes.

The secret to an aesthetically pleasing compost process is to cut up waste into small pieces, observe hygienic practices, and achieve a proper balance of materials.

Small pieces, which one makes by cutting the materials with a knife or pruner, make for large surface area and very rapid decomposition. A pruner and some elbow grease will turn a pile of branches from trash into raw materials for your compost and are an essential tool for any garden with trees or shrubs. For really big jobs, you may need a chipper.

Compostables consist of two types of material: carbon-rich matter (like branches, stems, peels, bits of wood, bark dust, or sawdust) gives compost its light, fluffy body, and nitrogen or protein-rich matter (manures, food scraps, leafy materials like lawn clippings) provides raw materials for making enzymes. In order to have optimum health in your compost or worm box, it is important to have much more carbon than nitrogen. This allows oxygen to penetrate and nourish the living, breathing organisms that reside there. Too much nitrogen makes for a heavy, smelly, slowly decomposing mass. Good compost hygiene means covering fresh nitrogen-rich material, which can release odors if exposed to open air, with carbon-rich material, which often exudes a fresh, wonderful smell. If in doubt, add more carbon!

Making friends with trees

Many of the world's rich humans have taken up especially tree-unfriendly habits. I am speaking of the widespread use of disposable paper products in the wealthy countries: paper towels and bags, napkins, tissues, paper plates and dishes, even diapers! All of these have venerable versions made of cloth or other re-usable material. With a little creativity, we can all imagine easy ways to reduce or eliminate these from our lives. Take a sturdy earth-bag or even a back-pack when you shop. Enjoy the feeling of real dishes when you eat or drink! Buy in bulk when possible. A typical paper or plastic bag can be used a dozen times or more. Handkerchiefs need to come back into fashion. When you must make a photocopy or print-out, use both sides or use the second side of a sheet in the recycle bin. How often do we have the opportunity to cut our paper consumption by half? Better yet, work diligently towards the ideal of paperless communication where trees are replaced with electronic mail!

Personal care products present another opportunity to save trees. Elegant re-usable feminine napkins are available at many ecology-conscious stores. If you're especially thrifty, cut an old towel into six by twelve inch rectangles and fold into six layers for use. They have excellent absorbency and are quite easy to wash. Here's another challenge: instead of toilet paper, consider cleaning yourself with soap and water and pat dry with a towel. You'll find it definitely much cleaner.

By following these simple tips, our family of five has reduced our garbage to half a grocery bag every two months. And because it contains no rotting food, our house is a much cleaner place.
Water Conversation

One of my hobbies is to see how little water it takes to run our household. We've managed to cut our city water consumption by more than 95% by using rainwater creatively during the rainy season. Our last water meter reading registered so little use it didn't even show up on the meter! Not everyone will be willing to install a rainwater catchment system, of course. Nevertheless, all of us can make substantial reductions in our water consumption (and reduce energy needed to heat hot water, too) by making some thoughtful changes in our habits.

Dishwashing. If you wash dishes by hand, consider this technique: scrape off any leftovers and briefly rinse with just a dribble of water. Then turn off the water and soap dishes with a sponge or scouring pad. Finally, quickly rinse with a slow stream of water. Use cold water where possible. (In our house, we have shut off all hot water faucets except the shower.)

Bathing. When running the hot water faucet until it is warm, catch the initial flow for watering plants or other uses. Avoid deep baths. Use a conservation shower head: a 5 minute shower will use only a few gallons. Repeat the technique for washing dishes: get wet, turn the water off, soap, then rinse. It works great on bodies, too! Obviously, it makes no sense to run water during shaving or toothbrushing.

Garden Irrigation. Mulching (with compost or other chopped garden waste) and drip irrigation will keep your plants healthy with much less water. Consider saving rainwater. An enormous amount falls on every roof or other impermeable surface in Oregon. If you do, be sure to keep mosquitoes out of standing water with, for example, netting.

Laundry. Use cold water whenever possible. When you purchase a machine, get a front loader. They substantially reduce water, detergent, energy consumption, and are much gentler on clothes. Because of higher spin speeds, clothes emerge much drier. Then the job can be finished on a clothes line, either indoors or out.

Toilets. The new efficient flush toilets use a fraction of the water of the older models. If you're really serious, though, you'll consider a composting variety. The idea has really caught on in Scandinavia, where some villages are phasing out the old-fashioned flush variety! Since implementing our own composting strategy and the other techniques, we have reduced our family's water consumption to less than 75 gallons per day for two adults and three children. And we don't feel the least bit inconvenienced by it.
Miscellaneous

Clothing mending. Many of us grew up in a families that took for granted the repair of clothing to extend its life many times. Here's a simple example of that ideal: I have found that tube sock (mainly threadbare heel areas) and long underwear (mainly threadbare knee and elbow areas) life can be enhanced for years with a simple but admittedly non-traditional repair. Darning is out as it is way too laborious! I have been using a sewing machine as it is much faster and gives a good result. One simply turns a worn sock or garment in side out, then gathers up the edges around the worn area and zips them together with a couple of quick sews. The trick is to sew perpendicularly to the length of the sock or sleeve so as not to make it narrower. (Otherwise your foot or extremity won't fit!) Using this technique I have really great socks and long underwear that are years old. Faded, yes, but otherwise very serviceable! Of course, eventually, there develop enough worn areas that even this won't work and you end up with a rag. Then recycle it into a rag rug!

Hoss
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MONGERAL & WORKIN AT IT
*&*
THERE ARE FOUR KINDS OF PEOPLE IN THE WORLD....

THOSE THAT LIKE YOU FOR THE RIGHT REASONS
THOSE THAT LIKE YOU FOR THE WRONG REASONS
THOSE THAT DON'T LIKE YOU FOR THE WRONG REASONS
THOSE THAT DON'T LIKE YOU FOR THE RIGHT REASONS

IT IS ONLY THE LAST GROUP YOU NEED TO WORRY ABOUT

So go tell me DOGS

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Posted: Jan 31 2005, 12:08 AM
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my contribution on a small level,
I refuse to own a cell phone.

my lithium ion battery in my Sony mavica is shot.
My sony mavica only finalizes the pictures when I lean it on its side,
as it is 3 years old now and has been dropped , trashed reapaired , dropped beaten , wet, abused but still runs,aftere 20000 pictures taken and I will not buy a new one till this one completely gives up the ghost.
sometimes when finalizing the jpgs on the disc,
I have to give the camera Reiki to get thru the process without crashing.

But Hoss,
this one goes a bit too far

"Elegant re-usable feminine napkins are available at many ecology-conscious stores"

I don't think so.

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Hoss the SURVIVER
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  Posted: Jan 31 2005, 12:26 AM
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HI ALL
HI VIANOVA,
AWW don't be wastefull, live ahh adventerously
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--------------------
MONGERAL & WORKIN AT IT
*&*
THERE ARE FOUR KINDS OF PEOPLE IN THE WORLD....

THOSE THAT LIKE YOU FOR THE RIGHT REASONS
THOSE THAT LIKE YOU FOR THE WRONG REASONS
THOSE THAT DON'T LIKE YOU FOR THE WRONG REASONS
THOSE THAT DON'T LIKE YOU FOR THE RIGHT REASONS

IT IS ONLY THE LAST GROUP YOU NEED TO WORRY ABOUT

So go tell me DOGS

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~ James A. Garfield, President of the United States


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