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> 33 dead in Virginia Tech Campus Shooting, Check back for updates...


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Posted: Apr 16 2007, 02:30 PM
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Virginia Tech death toll 32 plus gunman; motive still unclear
Massacre was deadliest shooting spree in U.S. history
April 16, 2007

By SUE LINDSEY

ASSOCIATED PRESS

This report will be updated

BLACKSBURG, Va. — A gunman opened fire in a dorm and a classroom today at Virginia Tech, killing 32 people in the deadliest shooting rampage in U.S. history, government officials said. The gunman then killed himself, bringing the death toll to 33.

At least 26 people were being treated at area hospitals for injuries, police said. The injuries included gun wounds, but also broken bones and sprains sustained by students who jumped from windows to escape. Authorities said at least six were in surgery late this afternoon, and one was moved to a trauma center.


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Posted: Apr 16 2007, 10:21 PM
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WP: 2-hour gap raises questions

Students wonder why classes weren’t canceled
The Washington Post
Updated: 1:21 a.m. ET April 17, 2007

A single question stood out yesterday at Virginia Tech: Would more students be alive if the university had stopped them from going to class after a shooting occurred in a campus dorm?

The first shooting was reported at 7:15 a.m. in a dormitory, West Ambler Johnston Hall, where police found two people fatally wounded. But the first e-mail message from the Virginia Tech administration to students did not go out until more than two hours later, at 9:26 a.m., stating that a shooting had occurred but with no mention of staying indoors or staying off campus or canceling classes.

About 9:45, the shootings began in Norris Hall, a classroom building at the other end of the sprawling campus. Police said the gunman killed 30 people at Norris and wounded about 30 before killing himself.

"I don't know why they let people stay in classrooms," said Sean Glennon, a junior from Centreville and the quarterback on the Hokies football team. "A lot of people are angry that campus wasn't evacuated a little earlier."

The university president and campus police chief said they decided not to cancel classes after the first shootings because the initial indication at the dorm, based on interviews with witnesses, was that the attack might have been a domestic-violence incident and that the shooter probably had fled the campus.

"We were acting on the best information we had at the time," said Wendell Flinchum, the campus police chief. "We felt that this incident was isolated to that dormitory."

University President Charles W. Steger said officials also were unsure what the alternative would be to allowing classes to proceed. More than 14,000 of the university's 26,000 full-time students live off campus, and, with some classes starting at 8 a.m., many of them were en route when officials were having to decide, he said. The university and police decided that students would be safer in their classrooms than milling around the campus or in their dorms, he said.

‘Lockdown’ in classrooms

"The question is, [where] do you keep them that is more safe?" Steger said. He added: "We concluded that it was best, once they got in their classrooms . . . to lock them down" there.

Officials characterized the response as a "lockdown" in classrooms, but with the first e-mail alert not going out until 9:26, most students were oblivious to any trouble.

Dustin Lynch, 19, a sophomore from Churchville, Md., said that at the time of the Norris Hall shootings, he was out on the Drillfield, a large oval lawn on campus, raising money for charity with other members of the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity. It was only when he saw a swarm of police cruisers racing to Norris Hall that he knew something was amiss.

University officials said classroom buildings are open at all times except late at night. The university could have restricted access to the building using an electronic key-card system built into many doorways, according to a law enforcement source, but investigators thought the shooter might have been a student with a key card that would have given him access to the buildings despite the lockdown.

"The question everyone is asking is: How can you have two hours between the shootings and the place not be locked down?" said the source, who was given an intelligence briefing yesterday but was not authorized to speak publicly.

The university was aware of the challenges involved in reaching students during a crisis, even in an age when everyone seems to be wired. In August, a jail inmate escaped, fatally shot a hospital guard and a sheriff's deputy and then hid on campus on the first day of classes, setting off a manhunt that shut down campus.

The university posted updates on its Web site that day and sent out e-mails, but it took longer for the news to reach students who were commuting to school and were not online.

A campus spokesman said earlier this semester that the university was working with a company to provide a service that would send out text-message alerts to students' cellphones. The university was considering requiring students to give their cellphone numbers when they register for classes, he said.

Yesterday, Steger said that the university would review its emergency response policies again in light of the shootings but that only so much could be done to prepare for unforeseen disasters.

"It's very difficult. This is an open society and an open campus with 26,000 people, and we can't have armed guards in front of every classroom every day of the year," he said. "It was one of those things no one anticipated. . . . Honestly, every situation we face is different."

Stronger e-mail

It was not until 9:50 a.m., after the Norris Hall shootings, that a stronger e-mail warning from the university reached students: "A gunman is loose on campus. Stay in buildings until further notice. Stay away from all windows."

A third e-mail went out at 10:16, canceling classes and asking students to stay put. And it was 10:52, more than an hour after the Norris Hall shootings, that an e-mail went out stating that the attack had occurred.

Justin Born, a junior from Centreville, had left for his 10:10 class after checking his e-mail and seeing the first 9:26 notice about being "cautious."

"I was like, 'All right.' I decided to go to class, because I didn't think it was that big of a deal," he said.

After parking on campus and walking to class, he saw people running to cars and running from the campus, shouting about the second shooting. It was only after he got home that he saw the e-mail about classes being canceled.

"I don't know how to describe it," he said. "It just seems, I don't know, immature. I don't if immature is the right word, but it doesn't seem like Virginia Tech did the right thing by not canceling class after a shooting. It was ridiculous."


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Posted: Apr 16 2007, 11:34 PM
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QUOTE
"I don't know why they let people stay in classrooms," said Sean Glennon, a junior from Centreville and the quarterback on the Hokies football team. "A lot of people are angry that campus wasn't evacuated a little earlier."

I know why...

THEY wanted more deaths

More shock and awe.... now turn in your guns so you will be safer.
bartborg.gif




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"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Apr 17 2007, 08:42 AM
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MASSACRE AT VIRGINIA TECH: 33 KILLED ON CAMPUS

Police identify killer in Virginia Tech rampage

By David Zucchino, Maura Reynolds and Joel Havemann, Times Staff Writers
8:35 AM PDT, April 17, 2007


BLACKSBURG, VA. -- Virginia Tech police today identified the shooter who took 32 lives as well as his own Monday as student Cho Seung-Hui, a 23-year-old South Korean national and resident alien.

The body of the senior English student was found in one of four classrooms in Norris Hall where he took most of his victims, said Virginia Tech Police Chief Wendell R. Flinchum.

Police said Cho used two guns in the classroom building, where the bulk of the killings occurred. Authorities said they found two handguns, a 9 mm and a .22-caliber, in the classroom where Cho's body was found when the shooting ended.

Ballistic tests showed that one of the guns was also the one that was used to shoot and kill the two victims in the dormitory about two hours before the slaughter in Norris Hall, police said.

"It's certainly reasonable for us to assume that Cho was the shooter in both places," Flinchum said. But he said police had not entirely ruled out the possibility that there were two shooters.

A press conference held on campus this morning also left many questions unanswered in the worst gun rampage in U.S. history: What was Cho's motive? Why did school officials not notify the student body of the early two killings before the disaster in Norris Hall? Did Cho have any help in preparing for his rampage?

Charles Steger, president of Virginia Tech. announced that classes would be canceled for the week and Norris Hall, an engineering building where all but two of the killings occurred, would be closed for the rest of the semester.

A convocation, expected to be attended by President Bush, was scheduled for 2 p.m. Bush, who has received condolence calls from foreign leaders, today ordered U.S. flags to be flown at half-staff through Sunday at sunset, said White House press secretary Dana Perino.

"This is a tragedy that was felt around the world," Perino said.

The White House declined to discuss calls for tighter gun control. "Today is a time to focus on the families, the school and the community," she said. "The facts of the case need to unfold."

At least two dozen others were injured in the rampage, authorities said. Witnesses said some panicked students had leaped from second-floor windows to escape the killer.

Flinchum said late Monday that investigators were still questioning a "person of interest" in the first shooting.

Erin Sheehan, who was in a German class when the gunman entered, said that she played dead while wounded students lay around her. Sheehan told the campus Collegiate Times newspaper that the assailant was wearing what appeared to be a black ammunition belt, and peeked into the room after her class had started. Moments later, she said, he began shooting through the door.

She said that she and several students "forced ourselves against the door" to keep the gunman out, but the volley of bullets drove them back. When she scanned the room moments later, she said, "everyone was either dead or injured."

Sheehan said she was one of five people to emerge unscathed from the classroom after the gunman moved on.

Although authorities did not identify any of the victims, colleagues confirmed that German instructor Christopher James Bishop, 35, was among the dead. Bishop was nearly an hour into his introductory German class when the shooter entered and fired dozens of rounds.

Authorities said the gunman apparently blockaded the front entrance of Norris Hall with chains. Heavily armed police teams surrounded the engineering hall and rushed in, reportedly using stun grenade blasts.

"It was probably one of the worst things I've seen in my life," Flinchum said, describing the carnage on the second floor of Norris Hall, a gray stone building that sits on the northern end of the Virginia Tech campus, about 160 miles west of Richmond.

In addition to those killed, officials at several hospitals said that another 26 people, most of them students, were being treated for gunshots and other injuries. The majority were taken to Montgomery Regional Hospital, where emergency room doctors and nurses processed them so quickly that they identified them by numbers instead of names at first. At least three of Montgomery's wounded remained in critical condition, officials said.

"I don't know that you can ever fully prepare for this level of violence," hospital CEO Scott Hill said.

During a news conference hours after the shootings, a subdued Charles W. Steger, Virginia Tech's president, said he was "at a loss to explain and understand the carnage that has visited our campus."

Steger said that investigators initially thought that the dorm shooting was a domestic incident and that the gunman had left campus. As a result, Steger said, a campuswide alert to Virginia Tech students and faculty did not go out for about two hours.

"It's one of those things no one could anticipate," Steger said. "You can only make your decision based on the information on that moment in time."

But students like Laura Spaventa, a sophomore media major, expressed dismay that classes had been allowed to continue after the first shooting.

"I don't understand their logic behind that," she said. "It does bother me. I feel like a lot of lives could have been saved and a lot fewer injuries."

Spaventa described the horror of sitting in class in a nearby building and hearing the attack. "We were in class and got an e-mail about the first shootings, but classes kept going," she said. "And then we got another e-mail saying to stay where we were, that there was a shooter on the loose. Then we heard five shots.

"My teacher shut the blinds and locked the door, and we all got away from the windows and under the desks. And we started calling our family and friends on our cellphones to tell them we were OK."

"It was very scary," Spaventa said. "I called my dad crying."

Authorities said they first responded to a 911 call about a shooting at the residence hall. At that time of morning, students normally could only enter the residence by using electronic card keys. Inside, authorities found two victims, one male and one female, on the fourth floor. The victims were taken to a nearby hospital but were later pronounced dead, Flinchum said.

Steger said that after the dormitory shootings -- in which a male resident advisor and a female student were killed -- school officials notified other resident advisors at the dormitory to take security precautions. The building was searched and secured by police, he said.

Authorities identified the "person of interest" and decided it was not necessary to shut down campus activities. In addition, Steger said, officials felt that the thousands of commuter students headed for class would be more easily protected once they were on campus.

Asked whether police were pursuing the wrong person while the gunman was preparing to open fire at Norris, Flinchum replied: "We acted on the best information we had at the time."

Added Steger: "We had no reason to suspect any other incident was going to occur."

But at 9:45 a.m., it did.

As campus officers were questioning witnesses in the dormitory shooting, reports of a second attack poured in to 911 dispatchers.

An amateur video taken by a student from a cellphone showed several officers hesitating outside Norris Hall, then positioning themselves behind a tree before finally rushing inside.

"I was walking on campus and I saw police shooting," the student, Jamal Azim Albarghouti, said. "They dropped a gas bomb, a tear gas bomb or something at the building, and I think they were shooting too."

Michael O'Brien, a sophomore studying industrial engineering, said he received the e-mail about the first shooting but continued to a class at Norris just as the second shooting began.

"I could tell something was wrong," O'Brien said, when he saw people staring at the building as he approached. "But it didn't really register with me with the earlier e-mail.

"Then I heard a gunshot. I saw students rushing out of Norris Hall, being directed by police officers where to go."

He said he hurried back to his dorm and could see Norris Hall from his window.

"I saw police cars from all different levels -- state, local, county -- rush by. Ambulances, SWAT vans. I could see police officers carrying what looked to be bodies out of the back of the hall and into ambulances. And you could see police officers surround the building and rush into it."

Tyler Benson, a student who lives at West Ambler Johnston, said he was asleep during the first shooting. Later, he saw police tape around the building and officers directing people down the stairs and away from elevators.

"I saw a bunch of people looking over toward the Norris area," Benson said. "Then there was a cop who turned around and ran at us, told us to 'run, run, run,' get out of there. We all ran away from campus. And as I was running away, I could hear a couple of shots going off."

Flinchum said authorities were exploring whether two recent bomb threats on campus were related to the shootings.

Virginia Atty. Gen. Bob McDonnell said late Monday that his office probably would launch a review of the case as well.

The killing spree at Virginia Tech was the deadliest such incident in modern U.S. history, outstripping the 1991 mass murder at a Luby's Cafeteria in Killeen, Texas, in which 23 people were gunned down. It also surpassed the 1999 toll at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo., where two teenage gunmen killed 13 people and themselves.

In Washington, President Bush expressed his regrets to the families of the Virginia Tech victims. "Schools should be places of sanctuary and safety and learning," he said. "When that sanctuary is violated, the impact is felt in every American classroom."


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Zucchino and Reynolds reported from Blacksburg and Braun from Washington.

Times staff writers Stephen Braun, Molly Hennessey-Fiske and Adam Schreck in Blacksburg; Richard A. Serrano, Josh Meyer, Faye Fiore, David Willman and Greg Miller in Washington; and Times researchers John Beckham in Chicago and Jenny Jarvie in Atlanta contributed to this report.


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Posted: Apr 17 2007, 08:52 AM
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dang them aliens
alien1.gif
QUOTE
Virginia Tech police today identified the shooter who took 32 lives as well as his own Monday as student Cho Seung-Hui, a 23-year-old South Korean national and resident alien.




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"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Apr 17 2007, 09:23 AM
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It's obvious that a disarmed citizenry has no defense against gun toting manchurian candidates.

QUOTE
Campus Gun Ban Disarmed Virginia Tech Victims

http://www.prisonplanet.com/articles/april...60407gunban.htm


I have to connect with too many IPs at Prison Planet so I did not read the article I linked above.




--------------------
QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Apr 17 2007, 09:30 AM
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QUOTE (Mark J. Harper @ Apr 17 2007, 11:52 AM)
dang them aliens

hmm5.gif Yeah... He was supposedly a South Korean National... but something just don't seem right about that...


QUOTE
Grim task of recovering bodies starts after dark
April 18, 2007

BLACKSBURG: Four hospitals in this rural area of south-western Virginia were swamped after more than two dozen victims of the shooting rampage began arriving soon after 7.30am.

"I don't know if you can ever be prepared for this type of violence," the chief executive of Montgomery Regional Hospital, Scott Hill, said on Monday night. At least four victims were fighting for their lives after strong winds prevented helicopters airlifting them to larger trauma centres.

Of the 17 students treated at the hospital, five were discharged on Monday night but three were listed as critical, Mr Hill said.

One person was in a critical condition at Carilion New River hospital, said a spokeswoman, Sharon Honaker. Three other victims taken there were listed as stable.

As hospitals tended to the wounded, rescue workers began the grim task of recovering the bodies. After dark, a cortege of ambulances trundled up to Norris Hall, where most of the killings occurred. They backed up to the two-storey building, waiting while bodies were loaded into makeshift hearses.
QUOTE
Va. Tech shooter left note
April 17, 2007
Posted by the Washington Bureau

Cho Seung-Hui, the Virginia Tech student identified as the campus shooter responsible for the largest, gun-related mass murder in U.S. history, was a troubled 23-year-old legal permanent resident from South Korea who investigators believe left an invective-filled note in his dorm room that included a rambling list of grievances and died with the words "Ismail Ax" in red ink on the inside of one of his arms.

And he had shown recent signs of violent, aberrant behavior, according to an investigative source, including setting a fire in a dorm room and allegedly stalking some women. A note believed to have been written by Cho was found in his dorm room that railed against "rich kids," "debauchery" and "deceitful charlatans" on campus.


The English major from Centreville, Va., a rapidly growing suburb of Washington, D.C., came to the United States in 1992, an investigative source said. His family runs a dry cleaning business and he has a sister who atatended Princeton University, the source said.

Investigators believe that Cho at some point had been taking medication for depression. They also believe that the gunman used the same weapon in both the attack in the dorm room at Virginia Tech and the larger scale classroom killings. Investigators are examining Cho's computer for more evidence.


http://newsblogs.chicagotribune.com/news_t...ing_supect.html

I googled "Ismail Ax" and didn't find anything... yet.


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Posted: Apr 17 2007, 09:49 AM
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QUOTE
Campus Gun Ban Disarmed Virginia Victims
VA Tech has "blood on its hands" as gun control advocates milk tragic events
Paul Joseph Watson & Alex Jones
Prison Planet
Monday, April 16, 2007
QUOTE
A gun ban recently enforced by Virginia Tech campus prevented over thirty victims of today's mass shooting from defending themselves against the killer, and yet gun control advocates are already politicizing this morning's tragic events to pull the lever for mass gun control.

Virginia is a concealed carry state and yet Virginia Tech campus recently enforced a policy prohibiting "unauthorized possession, storage or control" of firearms on campus.

According to gun rights activists such as Aaron Zelman of Jews For The Preservation of Firearms, VA Tech has "blood on its hands" for disarming the victims and other students who could potentially have stopped the killer in his tracks in the three hour time period he was allowed to carry out his rampage by cowardly police who hid behind trees as the carnage ensued.

Reuters is already disseminating the talking points for an imminent propaganda coup against the Second Amendment, and yet it was the stripping of that right to bear arms that ensured today's death toll represents the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history.

"Advocates of wider gun controls said the availability of guns in the United States had made it easier for people to commit murder everywhere, including in schools and colleges," reports Reuters, with no mention of the fact that had the victims been allowed to exercise their concealed carry rights, the casualty figures may have been far lower.

Students at VA Tech are already slamming the pathetic response on behalf of the police, who locked down the school and sat back as the killer was able to carefully pick off his targets.

"What happened today this was ridiculous. And I don't know what happened or what was going through this guy's mind," student Jason Piatt told CNN. "But I'm pretty outraged and I'll say on the record I'm pretty outraged that someone died in a shooting in a dorm at 7 o'clock in the morning and the first e-mail about it — no mention of locking down campus, no mention of canceling classes — they just mention that they're investigating a shooting two hours later at 9:22."

He added: "That's pretty ridiculous and meanwhile, while they're sending out that e-mail, 22 more people got killed."


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Posted: Apr 17 2007, 10:34 AM
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Asians fear backlash after Virginia Tech shooting
17 Apr 2007 17:58:25 GMT
Source: Reuters

By Andrea Hopkins

BLACKSBURG, Va., April 17 (Reuters) - Virginia Tech student Jiyoun Yoo was terrified when she heard a gunman had rampaged through her campus, killing 32 people. When news broke on Tuesday that the gunman was a South Korean student, her fear took a new direction.

"I'm from South Korea, so I am a little bit scared," said Yoo, 24, as she walked on campus. Only one person was responsible for the massacre, she said, "but maybe it will affect all South Korean students."

The gunman who carried out the worst shooting rampage in modern U.S. history was identified as Cho Seung-Hui, 23, an English literature student. He had lived legally in the United States with his parents for 14 years, a U.S. immigration official said.

Yoo, a petite graduate student with long black hair, said she didn't know the gunman and none of her Korean friends had heard of him either.

"If he speaks Korean, we'd maybe know him, but none of us does," she said. She said her family in Seoul had called overnight, very concerned Yoo might be a target if there was a backlash against Asian students at Virginia Tech.

"It is big news in South Korea. Yesterday they were worried if I'm safe, now they are worried there might be a risk that I'm South Korean," said Yoo.

In Seoul, the South Korean government also expressed fears of a backlash.

"We are working closely with our diplomatic missions and local Korean residents' associations in anticipation of any situation that may arise," a Foreign Ministry official said.

South Korea has the largest number of foreign students in the United States -- nearly 15 percent -- according to the U.S. Customs and Enforcement Web site.

Police say Cho chained doors closed to trap students inside as he gunned them down before killing himself. There were early rumors the gunman was Asian, but his identity was not disclosed until Tuesday.

Some 1,655 students at Virginia Tech, or 6.2 percent, are Asian, the university's Web site says.

Annie Hang Tran, a member of the Korean American Student Association, said Cho did not belong to the group. "I didn't know the shooter," she said, declining further comment.

White students on campus dismissed suggestions there might be a backlash against foreigners at the university.

"It hadn't even crossed my mind," said Andrew Rush, 20, an accounting major. "There is a huge Asian community on campus and we're all together in class all day. It's so integrated I don't think this will change anything."

Foreign-born residents in Blacksburg said the town, nestled in the mountains of southwest Virginia, is a welcoming place.

"Everyone has always been open and supportive," said Xiaojin Moore, co-owner of the Oasis World Market grocery store a mile (1.6 km) from campus.

Moore, a native of China, hopes her three small children will not be targeted because of their Asian appearance.

"We just want to be left alone to figure things out, until things calm down," Moore said. (Additional reporting by Jack Kim in Seoul and Andy Sullivan in Washington)


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Posted: Apr 17 2007, 10:47 AM
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thanks for posting the Prison Planet article
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--------------------
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"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Apr 17 2007, 05:22 PM
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Hello Pupp, long time no see. I know I have been extremely busy moving.......Had to get out of the West, the economy sucks.

Down to why I am posting here. It was a tragedy indeed to lose that many folks. I have read a play that the 23 yr old wrote and it was disturbing. It is being used to create a sort of "fear stimulator" in the minds of everyone. If this person needed help, then why was he not helped? That is the question after reading his play Richard McBeef that burns in my mind.

His stepfather was white I take it and his mother Korean. I think (after reading between the lines) that his father died some time ago while he was younger than 13. His mother remarried shortly after his father died and it was his stepfather that controlled the household. In the cases of step-parent most do not get along with the parent that remarries after death or divorce. The stepfather did control the children and showed some sort of abuse towards the boy. The mother appeared to be supporting until she surrendered to the father's sweet-talk. After that, the mother's violence after John walked down the stairs to tell the mother that Richard McBeef tried to molest him made her angry (which is fantasy). The mother appeared to support the son, however I would like to argue this case a bit.

The mother appeared to take up for her son.....which is an unusaul twist in the case of parents who do not get along with their children. In most cases of molestation, from what I have read from in past stories, the parent that notices the molestation very seldom goes to get help. For example, if the daughter is being molested by the father, there is often that the mother knows something about it and takes a blind eye to the situation and is scared to seek help for embarassment. I really think that there was nothing that could have been done to help this individual because he was damaged in his childhood and could not shake the issues out of his mind. Maybe something could have been done to help the kid. The plays that he wrote have been submitted on AOL news but they cut out some parts that would help me understand the situation more.

Nice to "chat" with you again Pupp.

This post has been edited by akihset2004 on Apr 17 2007, 05:26 PM


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Posted: Apr 17 2007, 05:54 PM
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hi akihset2004, remember, I come from an abusive childhood with my alcoholic barrel chested genius step father and I have not killed anyone---yet.

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QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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The Great Ving
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Posted: Apr 17 2007, 07:11 PM
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Hello akihset2004...

I just took a look for the two plays after seeing your post about them and have found the links to them...


Cho Seung-Hui's play, 'Richard McBeef'

http://news.aol.com/virginia-tech-shooting...417134109990001


Cho Seung-Hui's play, 'Mr. Brownstone'

http://news.aol.com/virginia-tech-shooting...417141309990001


The plays were so disturbing that one of his professors did contact school officials as well as the police...

QUOTE
In morbid plays, Cho's characters dreamed of killing
POSTED: 8:16 p.m. EDT, April 17, 2007

(CNN) -- Classmates and a professor say writings by Cho Seung-Hui, an English major accused of the Virginia Tech killing spree, were so disturbing that they felt he needed help.

Lucinda Roy, the former chairwoman of the English Department, told CNN that one of Cho's creative writing professors brought his writings to her attention.

Roy was so disturbed by them she went to the police and counselors "and everywhere else, and they would say, but there's nothing explicit here. He's not actually saying he's going to kill someone."

"The threats seemed to be underneath the surface," she said. "They were not explicit and that was the difficulty the police had."

"My argument was that he seemed so disturbed that we needed to do something about this," Roy said...


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Master Of His Domain
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Posted: Apr 18 2007, 03:52 AM
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whoa
EmoticonTheMask2.gif




--------------------
QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Master Of His Domain
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Posted: Apr 18 2007, 04:06 AM
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QUOTE
READER: Here in Switzerland there are similarities to what's going on in the US. With even a more weapons per capita, 6 million people => about 20 million weapons, ranging from handguns to main battle tanks, we have and had very few incidences so far. And as coincidence happens, just before the vote of the parliament about new weapon laws, a "mad-man" kills people with a military assault rifle (which every swiss citizen has at home). The shooter, a swiss of foreign origin, kills and wounds unknown people to him; with not motive and no reason what so ever. It seem he acted like a mind controlled robot. Strange ? No, it seems to be a coordinated effort, to disarm all people _worldwide_.




--------------------
QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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