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> Fires and floods from east to west U.S.


The Great Ving
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Posted: May 13 2007, 02:36 PM
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Over 400,000 acres burned or burning and thousands more flooded.... Scorched earth policy?



QUOTE
Fires and floods from east to west U.S.
May 13, 2007
QUOTE
Fires covering more than 200,000 acres prompted closure of 90 miles of interstate highways in two states Saturday, while floodwater broke through a Missouri River levee near Triplett, Mo. Meanwhile, a wildfire also burned on Santa Catalina Island.

Santa Catalina Island

In California, cooler weather aided firefighters Saturday as they battled to surround a 4,200-acre wildfire in the rugged, unpopulated interior of the island. The fire was a little less than halfway contained and was expected to be encircled by Tuesday evening, said Andrew Olvera, a Los Angeles County fire captain. One home and six businesses burned Thursday, but no one had been seriously injured.

Nearly 4,000 evacuated residents had started returning to the island.

Fog and highs only in the 60s diminished the threat of the fire spreading. It was isolated in the back country of the 76-square-mile island more than 20 miles off the Southern California coast.

The fire appeared to have been ignited by contractors working on antennas at a radio station in the island's interior, Avalon Fire Chief Steven Hoefs said.

Bill Agresta, chief engineer at station KBRT/740 AM, said three contractors had been cutting steel antenna cable with a gas-powered circular saw Thursday when the fire ignited.

Georgia and Florida

Smoke from a mammoth wildfire in the Southeast closed sections of two major highways Saturday. Crews were still battling a wildfire in Georgia and northern Florida that had burned 212,000 acres -- more than 330 square miles -- since lightning ignited it a week ago.

Florida officials closed a 35-mile stretch of Interstate 75 from the Georgia-Florida state line to Lake City, as well as a 40-mile stretch of I-10 Saturday morning because near-zero visibility from smoke. Georgia authorities closed the southbound lanes of I-75 for about 15 miles from Valdosta to the state line. Several accidents had occurred on the two highways, officials said.

In Georgia, the occupants of about 15 homes in the town of Fargo were urged to leave as a precaution because of the smoke and ash.

Missouri

The Missouri River neared its highest point in the state capital Saturday after a week of flooding towns upstream, but hydrologists said it wasn't nearly as bad as feared.

The river reached about 29 feet Saturday morning, some 6 feet above flood stage.

That was high enough to flood stretches of low-lying roads and nearly 1,400 acres of farmland but was short of the predicted 34-foot peak, which could have wiped out many farmers' crops for the year and inundated the Jefferson City Airport.

In north-central Missouri, Chariton County's emergency coordinator reported a major break in a Missouri River levee Friday near Triplett.

About 3,000 acres of farmland were flooded, but no one was hurt, and there aren't many homes in the region, state officials said.
QUOTE
Dry conditions causing rampant fires
May 13, 2007
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
QUOTE
MERIDIAN - So far in May, 57 fires have caused the loss of more than 625 acres of forest land in Mississippi, officials say.

"The scattered rain showers hopefully will help conditions in our area, but the fact is we are 15 inches below normal in rainfall for the year," Mississippi Forestry Commission spokesman Ed Brown said. "We need a break."

Even as Brown spoke on Friday, three fires were burning in Scott, Lauderdale and Newton counties. He said eight fires statewide Thursday burned 93 acres of land.

Since July 1, there have been 3,531 fires.
QUOTE
Fires continue to burn, major roads closed 
By SUZETTE PORTER
PINELLAS COUNTY
QUOTE
Some smoke lingered in the air around Pinellas on Sunday, but compared to the past few days, conditions were much improved.

Officials said smoke was expected to continue to be a problem across portions of the state, and winds were forecast to switch to the east Sunday night, pushing the smoke westward.

The Florida Division of Forestry reported that 225 fires involving 163,118 acres were burning on Sunday.


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Posted: May 13 2007, 04:18 PM
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Griffith Park just burned - again -- over 200 acres were scorched. The L.A. Zoo had to be evacuated. A homeless man covered in burns emerged from the scorched earth and stated he thinks he fell asleep while smoking a cigarette.
QUOTE
Scorched earth policy?

While not many will believe me, I've been saying this for 5 or 6 years now....

Look at Mars -- that is Earths future.

user posted image

Earth will be turned into a desert wasteland and mankind appears to be the virus.




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The Great Ving
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Posted: May 20 2007, 10:45 PM
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QUOTE
Earth will be turned into a desert wasteland and mankind appears to be the virus


I think the earth will respond.... or should I say retaliate... before it becomes like Mars.... as it has done before... America will become a mythological place as Atlantis is now and all that will be found is an occasional glass bottle and maybe a whole bunch of toilets, sinks and bathtubs... All the buildings will turn to dust and be buried under tons of assorted debris and maybe a couple of feet of rich volcanic soil...

Add another 2500 acres to the total number of acres burned...

QUOTE
Firefighters close in on 2,500 acre SoCal blaze
The Associated Press

Article Launched: 05/19/2007 11:54:23 PM PDT


GORMAN, Calif.- Firefighters on Sunday got close to containing a wildfire that chased thousands of campers from the Angeles National Forest and prompted the evacuation of a handful of homes.

The 2,500-acres blaze was 85 percent surrounded and crews projected full containment by early Monday, said Los Angeles County fire Capt. Mike Brown. The 200 firefighters on the lines were getting a boost from low evening temperatures.

"Everything is looking good," said Brown.

More than 3,000 people were evacuated from campsites at a state off-road recreation area, located between Los Padres and Angeles national forests, officials said. At least eight homes were evacuated as a precaution for the 4-square-mile blaze.

Brown said all residents have been allowed to return home, but didn't have details on whether campers were able to come back.

The fire was reported at about 2 p.m. Saturday near the Golden State Freeway just south of Gorman. No injuries have been reported and the cause was under investigation, authorities said.

Gorman is about 70 miles north of downtown Los Angeles.


http://www.mercurynews.com/news/ci_5940580


With over 200,00 acres burned, I'm thinking that there is going to be a temperature change on a micro-climate scale...

QUOTE
Summary:In summation, three variables were found to vary significantly between the two sites. Darker surfaces are better absorbers of visible light energy than lightcolored surfaces. These surfaces with a higher radiative property heat the airabove them more efficiently than lighter ones. This explains why temperatures at the burn site were higher than temperatures at the non-burned site. Relative humidity at ground level was essential equal at both sites. Higher ground level temperatures at the burned site translate into more water vapor in the air above the ground. The darker, hotter soil is evaporating the soil moistureat a higher rate than the soil cover with vegetation. Had we returned to the site another 24-48 hours after our last observation, we suspect that the relative humidity at the burned site would be lower than at the non-burned site. This would be due to the water rapidly evaporating from the burned soil due to higher surface temperatures and less canopy cover. However, due to the soaking rains of day 1, this was not found to be the case. Average wind speeds were greater at the burned site than at the non-burned site. This may be attributed to the lack of interference by vegetation, as the canopy in the burned site was incinerated, or due to the increased rate ofheating off of the blacked ashy surface. In addition, the burned site was on a steeper upslope, which may have contributed to increased wind speeds.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 10

At the burned site, there was less temperature variation with height on the rainy day than on the sunny day. This confirms our suspicions that solar heating of the darker surface has at least a moderate effect on temperature. Applications and Uses:1. Using information to help illustrate how the Earth warms its atmosphere (greenhouse effect).2. Using information to compare and contrast the color and texture of other earth surfaces, i.e. freshly plowed field vs. snow covered fields. 3. Using the current data collected to compare the same sites at different times of the year.


http://209.85.165.104/search?q=cache:E1XVC...clnk&cd=1&gl=us

I'm thinking that in the burned areas that there will be a temperature change from three to ten degrees depending on the source of the data, the time of year, etc. I'm also wondering about the effects that the burned areas will have on the microclimate of the unburned areas... I'm also checking for data on early Native American burning practices and whether of not there may have been a noticeable effect on the microclimate ... Milder winters in some places due to the darker soil types found in and within the vicinity the burned areas... hmm5.gif


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Posted: Jul 10 2007, 12:20 AM
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Another 300,000 acres are burning... So the total is now over 500,000 acres that has been scorched over the past few months... Carbon offsets and carbon tax??? blinkNEW.gif I'm still wondering I'm also wondering about the effects that the burned areas will have on the microclimate of the unburned areas... Seems to mw that over 500,000 acres of black terrain wouuld definitely cause a problem...

QUOTE
Dozens of Wildfires Ravage the West

Dozens of Wildfires Ravage the West; Rain Falls on South Dakota Fire That Killed Homeowner

By JOE KAFKA
The Associated Press
HOT SPRINGS, S.D.


Fire crews hoped for small breaks from the weather to help fight blazes fueled by high temperatures, tinder-dry conditions and gusty winds across the Western region on Monday.

A Hot Springs, S.D., wildfire that killed a man and left more than 30 families homeless spread somewhat to the southwest of the tourist town Monday, but fire officials expected to gain on it in the next day or so.

"My best guess is that we'll make some good ground on the fire," said Joe Lowe, state wildland fire suppression coordinator.

He told night-shift firefighters to be on their toes, however, for a cold front that was expected to sweep through the area overnight. The weather change could bring winds that easily might fan the flames, Lowe said.

Light rain early Monday helped calm the blaze, and Lowe was gaining confidence near day's end that the fire could be encircled. Some firefighters were preparing to return to their homes, but Lowe said that would depend on Monday night's progress.

The lightning-sparked fire had spread through a 14-square-mile area of Fall River County by late Monday.

Among the evacuees taking shelter at a Hot Springs community center was Mary Goulet, who said she and her husband didn't realize the seriousness until it was almost too late. She said she called 911 when fire surrounded the house.

"The flames burned our cars and we couldn't get out," she said. Then a firefighter in protective gear appeared at their door and led them to his fire truck, she said. It wasn't immediately clear whether their house survived.

Other fires blackened the landscape in California, Utah, Nevada, Washington, Colorado, Montana and Oregon, many of them also started by lightning and fueled by the dry conditions, made worse by a heat wave that sizzled across the West last week.

In addition to the death in South Dakota, smoke from a major Utah fire was blamed for two deaths in a weekend motorcycle accident, and another blaze still active in Utah killed three people on June 29.

Wildfires kept Kitt Peak National Observatory in southern Arizona closed Monday, and three small communities in the northern part of the state remained under evacuation orders as gusty winds and hot weather hampered firefighters' efforts.

At least nine fires larger than 100 acres were burning across the state, although most were in remote areas and not affecting people. Many were started by lightning strikes and fed by fuels that are tinder-dry from lack of rain and superheated by a persistent heat wave.

A fire, caused Friday evening by lightning strikes, grew from 3,500 acres to 5,755 acres Monday, said Jonetta Holt, a public information officer for the fire team battling the fire.

Crews in California's eastern Sierra Nevada gained ground against a fire that had charred at least 37,000 acres, or 58 square miles, in the Inyo National Forest.

That fire was 55 percent contained Monday after cooler temperatures and lighter wind allowed firefighters to make their first real progress, forestry officials said. Full containment was expected by Wednesday.

But a 12-square-mile wildfire burning in the Los Padres National Forest in southern California had expanded into dry brush and steep hills of the nearby San Rafael Wilderness Area, Santa Barbara County Fire Captain Eli Iskow said Monday.

"It's burning in areas that haven't even burned in recorded history," Iskow said. "The fuels are at historic lows in moisture, and now it's burning uphill. It's a formula that makes it very difficult to put out."

The fire threatened a historic wooden schoolhouse and two ranches, Iskow said.

What is said to be the biggest wildfire in Utah history had charged across more than 300,000 acres, or 468 square miles, of extremely dry sagebrush, cheat grass and pinion juniper in the central part of the state.

Firefighters won a small victory over that fire Monday, getting the blaze 10 percent contained thanks to low winds and increased resources. Fire managers expect to add another 10 crews to the firefighting effort, which had been hampered by gusty winds.

Mike Rutherford spent the day sifting through the remains of his Dog Valley Trading Post in Utah, an old log cabin where he sold American Indian crafts to travelers near historic Cove Fort. He had no insurance on his $50,000 inventory.

"All we could find were some handmade knives well, the blades anyway and some pottery," said Rutherford, 59. "Most of the things were pretty much dust."

At least six other fires were burning across Utah. A fire on the Utah-Arizona border more than doubled in size to 13,700 acres, or 21 square miles.

In north-central Washington, about 300 firefighters worked Monday to contain a wildfire that scorched about 4,500 acres, damaging several homes and outbuildings.

That fire was more than 50 percent contained, but residents of between 250 and 270 homes remained on notice that they might have to flee if the fire grows.

Forecasts for rising winds and temperatures that could fan the flames again continue to be a concern. Temperatures are expected to climb into the 90s and into triple digits in some parts of eastern Washington through the week, said Chuck Gulick, a spokesman for fire command headquarters.


Associated Press writers Marcus Wohlsen in San Francisco, Raquel Maria Dillon and Christopher Weber in Los Angeles, Jennifer Dobner in Salt Lake City, Martin Griffith in Reno, Nev., Moises D. Mendoza in Phoenix and Keith Ridler in Boise, Idaho, contributed to this report.
QUOTE
Wenatchee-area fire at 5,800 acres
Fireworks blamed for blaze threatening 270 residences
Associated Press
July 9, 2007


Winds whipped a wildfire to 5,800 acres on Sunday, but firefighters managed to protect hundreds of Wenatchee-area houses threatened by the flames.

As many as 270 houses were under evacuation advisories, but those that had been under mandatory evacuation orders were downgraded, allowing residents to return, said Rick Isaacson, spokesman for the Easy Street fire.

Two firefighters suffered minor injuries – one from dehydration.
QUOTE
300,000 acres ablaze in central Utah

A backfire burn fails

By Laura Hancock
Deseret Morning News

      SULPHURDALE, Beaver County — Smoke and dirt are smudged on the clothing of the gang of 21 — certain proof they were near a fire Sunday afternoon.
Scott G. Winterton, Deseret Morning NewsMembers of the Idaho City Hot Shots prepare to get off the mountain, where they planned to start a backfire but the wind changed direction.      But their attempts to start a fire weren't exactly successful: They got caught.

      Not by police, mind you, but by wind, which escorted flames from another fire in their direction.

      The gang is actually a crew of professional firefighters — mostly younger than 30 — who are normally based at Fishlake National Forest.

      Since Sunday afternoon, they have monitored land around Sulphurdale      in nearly 100-degree temperatures and on just a wink of sleep, trying to keep the state's largest wildfire in history at bay.

      By Monday night the wildfire, known as the Milford Flat fire, amassed 311,102 acres.

      Ten percent of the fire was contained on the north and west flanks, said Vince Mazzier, a fire information officer from the Great Basin Type 1 National Incident Management Team, which took over the firefighting efforts Monday morning.
      The fire spans about 80 miles from Beaver in the south to Fillmore in the north, and 20 miles from I-15 in the east to Milford in the west.

      By Monday night, 361 firefighters and personnel were fighting the blaze, which was sparked by lightning east of Milford on Friday. More crews were en route to the fire.

      The 21-person Fishlake crew is led by Eddie Taylor. By Sunday afternoon, the Milford Flat fire had jumped over I-15 in nearby Cove Fort. So, with a bulldozer, Taylor's crew decided to start a backfire near the freeway and Sulphurdale.
      The theory was that if the land was charred, the Milford Flat fire would stop before having an opportunity to jump the freeway again.

      Shortly after the Fishlake crew ignited the controlled blaze, the Milford Flat fire came roaring down the Mineral Mountains into the controlled fire's direction.
      "We knew it was coming down, but we didn't think it would be so fast," Taylor said.

Scott G. Winterton, Deseret Morning NewsFire crews wait in Sulphurdale to be sent out as smoke from the Milford Flat Fire fills the sky in central Utah.      The Fishlake crew jumped into action, trying to keep the Milford Flat fire behind about a half-mile of service road. The fire jumped the service road and a bulldozer-created fire line. It became too hot for firefighters to safely handle, and an air tanker was called to douse flames with retardant before it approached I-15.

      So much for the controlled burn. But the Fishlake crew didn't have much time to lament.

      "It's part of the job because we really have no control over the fire," said 21-year-old Nick Schneck. "We try to stop it and we try to control it, but it does what it wants."

      "You try to have a good attitude about it," said Shauntae Duffin, 20.
      The crew slept for 6 1/2 hours, then was back in Sulphurdale on Monday morning watching the fire and debating whether to start another controlled burn.
      "It's hard to stay sleepy when you're getting physical" because adrenaline kicks in, said Tyler Hunt, 19.

      On Monday, four single-engine air tankers sprayed retardant over the Milford Flat fire. Two heavy helicopters poured water over the fire, and one light helicopter transported firefighting managers over the blaze for mapping purposes.

      Firefighting costs so far have totaled $800,000, mostly in personnel and aviation, Mazzier said.

      Seventy-five percent of the state's costs will be footed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, after Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr. successfully applied for a FEMA grant Saturday.


      Huntsman visited the fire Monday, saying he would work with the federal agriculture and interior departments to reseed the burned-out areas with native grasses and to provide financial assistance to farmers who have lost cattle and crops.
      "If we do nothing, we'll see the re-emergence of cheat grass, which is a primary fuel in this fire," Huntsman said.

      Cove Fort rancher Alan Peacock, who believes federal government grazing policies contributed to the fire (which almost consumed his house), said it will take at least two years for native grasses to grow. And, in the meantime, cheat grass will fill in and become fuel for another fire.

Scott G. Winterton, Deseret Morning NewsGov. Jon Huntsman Jr. talks about the fire. He said he would work with the federal agriculture and interior departments to reseed the burned-out areas.      "The governor is talking about stuff that seems politically pleasing to people but it's not accurate," Peacock said.

      Rowdy Muir, the Type 1 team's commander, believes the cheat grass played an unusual role in the fire.

      "I think it's a combination of a lot of things," he said. "First, you don't have a good winter. Two, we had good spring rains that brought cheat grass," followed by 30 days of no precipitation, which dried the cheat grass and other plants.
      Muir told reporters Monday afternoon it was difficult to estimate a 100 percent containment date.

      "You're asking me to go way out on a limb," he said. "I would predict we'd have containment 10 days from now."

      The firefighters and personnel are staying in the Kanosh city park, which has about 250 tents. Food is catered by a government contractor. Tent buildings equipped with electricity for computers, fax machines and air conditioning are also contracted. Portable bathrooms and showers are provided through government contractors.

      Jaki Nordrum, the fire's logistical section chief, has about 40 people working for her to ensure firefighters are fed three daily meals, heavy with carbohydrates, and operations managers have their office needs met.

      She's done this type of work for 28 years.

      "Everything falls into place," she said. "I have my gear ready, and I throw it in my vehicle."

      Also Monday, several other fires scorched land throughout Utah and northern Arizona.

      In eastern Utah, the Neola North Fire burned more than 43,700 acres and was about 75 percent contained late Monday.

      During a community meeting in Roosevelt, officials announced the fire would be handed over to a Type III firefighting team on Wednesday. At that time, about 100 firefighters will take over efforts in the rugged, mountainous terrain of Ashley National Park. They plan to focus on containment rather than suppression, due to concerns about firefighter safety.

      The fire, which started late last month, has killed three people and destroyed a dozen homes.

      The Mathis Fire had scorched more than 1,300 acres in the Carbon County town of Kenilworth. Mines and other economic resources in the area were being threatened, fire officials said. The fire was 10 percent contained late Monday.
 
    On the Utah-Arizona border, the Black Rock Gulch Fire had burned more than 13,700 acres. Approximately 200 firefighters worked the blaze, which was about 10 percent contained Monday night.

      The Slide Fire, burning near Fredonia, Ariz., burned 6,000 acres but was 40 percent contained Monday, fire officials said.


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Posted: Aug 21 2007, 03:42 PM
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Hey DarmonVing,
Just north of me in Ventura county, 3 months later, a fire is still raging out of control with over 200,000 scorched acres of virgin lands that have never had a fire before in our brief history.

(quote from one of your articles above)
QUOTE
But a 12-square-mile wildfire burning in the Los Padres National Forest in southern California had expanded into dry brush and steep hills of the nearby San Rafael Wilderness Area, Santa Barbara County Fire Captain Eli Iskow said Monday.

"It's burning in areas that haven't even burned in recorded history," Iskow said. "The fuels are at historic lows in moisture, and now it's burning uphill. It's a formula that makes it very difficult to put out."

The fire threatened a historic wooden schoolhouse and two ranches, Iskow said.

I wonder if the smoke from the fires are reflecting some of the burning rays of the sun back into space?




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"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Oct 22 2007, 03:05 PM
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8 locations are on fire and raging out of control in Southern California.

Ontario, Irvine, San Diego, Aqua Dulce, Via Verde, Canyon Country, Chatsworth and Malibu Colony.

The local news media has shown us the fires on our tv screens 24/7

It is my opinion that these fires have all been intentionally set.




--------------------
QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Oct 23 2007, 02:22 PM
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news.gif
Over 1300 homes and buildings have been destroyed as 13 or more fires rage and scorch 25% of Californias coastline.




--------------------
QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Oct 23 2007, 03:28 PM
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If not deliberately set then started by idiots. There orta be a law preventing criminals and stupids from breeding.




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Posted: Oct 25 2007, 03:12 PM
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Is this the worst wildfire of all times?



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Posted: Oct 25 2007, 09:00 PM
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Q... the fires havn't stopped... and looks like they won't either...


Update:
With smoke still visible from space as seen by the Space Shuttle Astronauts, over 700 square miles have burned this past week in Southern California and over 23 fires, mostly all intentionally set by arsonists, caused over 1 billion dollars in damage to over 1500 homes and businesses and displaced 500,000 people.

10,000-15,000 people began camping out at Qualcomm (NFL Chargers) stadium in San Diego with relief goods arriving from hundreds of volunteers and good samaritans... that is until the police began checking I.D.'s and now the number staying at the stadium is down to 200-300 people.

Apparently, there were some people at the stadium collecting a free lunch!

10 fires are mostly contained but we are told by the experts that some of the fires will continue to burn well into December.

The Air Quality is very poor in Los Angeles, San Diego, Riverside, San Bernardino and surrounding suburbs.




--------------------
QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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