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POLITICAL ART GALLERY



IMPORTANT TOPICS

1. U.S. NEWS MEDIA CAN LEGALLY LIE TO YOU
There is no law preventing the U.S. news media from intentionally lying to the public. Whistle blowers and honest reporters are fired for telling the truth.

2. FLUORIDE IS A TOXIN/POISON
Read the Poison Warning label on your toothpaste, then call the 800# and ask;
"Why do you put poison in my toothpaste?"

3. NEW FLU VACCINE IS LOADED WITH MERCURY
by Dr. Joseph Mercola

4. PEDOPHILES IN HIGH PLACES
Also: Conspiracy of Silence Video

5. ASPARTAME IS HARMFUL
Equal, Nutra-Sweet and over 6000 food and beverage products contain Aspartame

6. On September 10, 2001, Donald Rumsfeld held a press conference to disclose that over $2,000,000,000,000 (2 Trillion) in Pentagon funds could not be accounted for.
Such a disclosure normally would have sparked a huge scandal. However, the commencement of the [9/11] attack on the World Trade Center and The Pentagon the following morning would assure that the story remained buried.


http://drinkingwaterlosangeles.com
Serving the greater Los Angeles area,
Los Angeles Drinking Water is proud to offer Reverse Osmosis filtration systems
that remove trace elements such as arsenic, mercury, lead and fluoride
which are known to be in Los Angeles tap water according to
the 2013 DWP Water Quality report.
POLITICAL ART GALLERY









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> ANIMAL ANOMALIES, Please Post All Reports Here


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Posted: Oct 4 2004, 09:37 AM
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Hey,
Here's a brief summary of reported animal anomalies in September. I think we get a better view of the changes in this format...

Pupp - I've tried to make it short!!!

3 sept
POLLUTION TRIGGERS BIZARRE BEHAVIOUR IN ANIMALS
http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99996343
Hyperactive fish, stupid frogs, fearless mice and seagulls that fall over. It sounds like a weird animal circus, but this is no freak show. Animals around the world are increasingly behaving in bizarre ways, and the cause is environmental pollution.

6 sept
UK MOTHS REVEAL 35-YEAR DECLINE
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/3625296.stm
British moths are in serious trouble, possibly because of changing climate, a scientist will reveal later this week. Dr Kelvin Conrad of Rothamsted Research will tell the British Association's annual meeting in Exeter that about two-thirds of UK moths are declining.

7 sept
CLIMATE CHANGE CAN SLASH ANIMAL GENE POOLS
http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99996359
Climate change can slash the genetic diversity of animals, affecting their long-term survival, suggests a study examining the evolution of two rodent species over 3000 years.

http://www.spacedaily.com/news/climate-04zzw.html
For the first time, scientists have found a direct relationship between global warming and the evolution of contemporary wildlife.

7 sept
WHAT IS KILLING UGANDA'S HIPPOS?
http://www.mg.co.za/Content/l3.asp?cg=Brea...frica&ao=121838
Hippos in a Ugandan game park are dying of a disease yet to be identified by scientists. Sixty have so far perished in the past two months, wildlife officials said on Tuesday.

9 sept
SCIENTISTS STUMPED BY DEAD CROAKERS - ATLANTIC COAST US
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/n.../9623229.htm?1c
Thousands of croakers have washed ashore at beaches along the Atlantic coast in recent days, the latest mass deaths of the popular sport fish.Researchers have so far been unable to explain why only Atlantic croakers have been struck along the coast, south to Florida.

9 sept
RARE SIGHTING OF WASP NORTH OF ARCTIC CIRCLE PUZZLES RESIDENTS - CANADA
http://www.cbc.ca/story/science/national/2...09.htmlSouthern Canadians wouldn't take a second look at a yellowjacket wasp circling around their picnic, but the discovery of the insect far north of the Arctic Circle has entomologists, well, buzzing. Noire Ikalukjuaq, the mayor of Arctic Bay, found a specimen of Vespula intermedia, or yellowjacket wasp, outside the community recently. Arctic Bay is on the northern tip of Baffin Island, at more than 73 degrees latitude.

9 Sept
THREATENED SPECIES TOTAL 'HUGELY UNDERESTIMATED
http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99996381
The true number of species at risk of extinction could be 50% higher than the total shown on the International Conservation Union’s Red List, according to a bleak new assessment.

9 sept
THOUSANDS OF BIRDS FOUND DEAD IN GREEK NATURE PRESERVE
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=stor...ds_040909165455
Thousands of migratory birds in the Greek nature reserve of Lake Koronia have died in recent months in what birds specialists are calling "an ecological catastrophe," several sources said.

10 sept
DARK FUTURE FOR WHITE ANIMALS IN ARCTIC
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=stor...onment_white_dc
Ideal for an Ice Age, white fur used as camouflage by animals from polar bears to Arctic foxes may be going out of fashion because of global warming.

17 sept
DEATHS OF SEABIRDS IN ALASKA BAFFLING TO BIOLOGISTS
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/0917deadbirds-ON.html
Biologists remain baffled by the death of hundreds of seabirds in early July at False Pass in the eastern Aleutian Islands. The die-off of more than 250 puffins, cormorants, kittiwakes, seagulls and eiders may have been caused by bacteria, parasites, marine biotoxins or unusual virus, said Dr. Rex Sohn, wildlife disease specialist for the U.S. Geological Survey's National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wis.

20 sept
MUSSELS NEAR NORTH POLE HINT AT WARMER EARTH
http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/science/09/20...reut/index.html
Mussels have been found growing on the seabed just 1,300 km (800 miles) from the North Pole in a likely sign of global warming, scientists said on Friday.The blue mussels, which normally favor warmer waters like off France or the eastern United States, were discovered last month off Norway's Svalbard archipelago in waters that are covered with ice most of the year."The climate is changing fast," said Geir Johnsen, a professor at the Norwegian University for Science and Technology who was among experts who found the bivalves.
*snip*
Inuit peoples in Canada, for instance, are seeing robins for the first time and hunters are falling through previously solid sea ice.
*snip*
In Scandinavia, birch trees are moving northwards into previously icy areas used for reindeer herding.

27 Sept
UN CALLS BIRD FLU 'WORLD CRISIS'
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/3695266.stm
Two UN agencies have warned that bird flu is set to remain a serious threat to animal and human life worldwide in the near future.
A case of human infection in Thailand this week sparked fresh fears.

30 Sept
MYSTERY OF THREE WHALES IN WALES
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/3703764.stm
Three whales have beached at different points on the Welsh coast in the past week, one was dead, the other dying but the third was put back out to sea.
It is over 100 years since three were washed up in such a short period.
Although experts do not know why, some say it is at best suspicious - and at worst "sinister".
*snip*
He said marine wildlife experts were concerned because the Navy had been trying out a new sonar system in the area, and there was good evidence that the sonar could be detrimental to whales and other animals.
He supported the theory that the animals could have been blown off course by the "concentrated, devastating noise of the sonar".
Mr Benson said around 30 whales had washed up off the coast of the Canaries following a Nato exercise involving the use of sonar around three years ago.



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Posted: Oct 4 2004, 12:00 PM
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Oh My, if that's just Sept, can you imagine what the past 10 or 20 years would show?

How very disturbing and how very sad.

QUOTE
Pupp - I've tried to make it short!!!


Blue Eyed, didn't you get the memo?

We were able to upgrade and should be able to handle all large posts now.

But keeping it short is good for those at work with little time to read or for those with short attention spans.

Nice Work! Thank You!

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--------------------
QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Oct 4 2004, 01:27 PM
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QUOTE
Blue Eyed, didn't you get the memo?
We were able to upgrade and should be able to handle all large posts now

Heyy that's good news Pupp!!! I guess you’ve got some donations then - :wasn't me: cause I'll have to send by snail mail... I'm glad you handled the fire bouncefire.gif so well when all of us GLP'ers invaded this place...

QUOTE
Oh My, if that's just Sept, can you imagine what the past 10 or 20 years would show?

I started this year to keep an eye on earth changes including animal anomalies, don't know if you ever saw my GLP-thread. I think the first to recon' earth/climate changes are the animals cause they are much more "on line" with Mother earth than humans. Maybe it's been like this for some years, but I think it will escalate with the climate change…. Faster and more dramatically in the years to come…

If you want me to post a summary on animal anomalies or climate/earth change so far this year – pliis tell me. Don’t know how you’ve been following this on Pupps…


BTW- i love your new icons - this is me in the morning --> pullhair.gif haha. Can you get a flower as well as icon. I miss that one...
Night.


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Posted: Oct 4 2004, 01:30 PM
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the last post was mine - I forgot to logg in...


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Posted: Oct 4 2004, 01:46 PM
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We have an albino squirrel here and we see it in our yard all the time.

I'm trying to get a good picture of it, but it's been too wily for me so far.


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Posted: Oct 12 2004, 12:07 AM
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Hi Wahya, I hope you will post the picture here on Pupp's if you get one... flower.gif


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Posted: Oct 12 2004, 03:16 AM
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Hi Pupp, I posted this summary on GLP before the crash but I guess it's lost by now... therefore I re-post it here... can be OK to have "for the record" to look back at...

9 March
WARMER WINTERS HURTING MOOSE - ISLE ROYALE, US
http://www.duluthsuperior.com/mld/duluthsu...ews/8145555.htm
Wolf numbers are up and moose are declining on Isle Royale, according to the 46th annual survey in the world’s longest study of predator-prey relationships. The moose population has slid to 750 on the Lake Superior island, down from 900 last year and 1,100 in 2002. Moose are faring better than when their numbers bottomed out at 500 after the deep-snow winter of 1995-96, when hundreds perished. But their numbers are in question because of ticks, heat stress and declining habitat

16 March
LOCUSTS SWARM - AUSTRALIA
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/3516132.stm
A plague of locusts that has devastated crops in the Australian outback has begun migrating south.
Heavy rains that ended a long drought in north-eastern Australia has provided ideal breeding conditions for the bugs. Officials said the swarms that appeared in remote parts of Queensland had moved to more built-up New South Wales.
”We were just staggering out of the drought, we are incredibly frustrated,” said farmer Bev Dennis, based 550 km (340 miles) west of Sydney. ”A thick haze of them came through over the weekend and chomped their way through our oats crop overnight,” she added. Until the weekend, locust fighters thought they had won the battle over Australia’s worst locust outbreak since December 2000. More than 200,000 hectares (494,000 acres) have been sprayed in a bid to contain the plague. But the heavy rainfalls that ended the drought last month rendered the insecticides virtually useless

16 March
RARE FISH SPECIES ONCE BELIEVED TO BE EXTINCT - TANZANIA
http://www.terradaily.com/2004/040316162311.kmseg935.html
Tanzanian fishermen have caught coelacanth, a rare species of fish that was once believed to be extinct, a senior conservation official said on Tuesday. “Coelacanth is a rare species of fish, which the world of science regarded as extinct and existed only in fossil records, saying that it lived some 50 million years ago,” Tanzanian Marine Parks and Reserves Manager Chikambi Rumisha told AFP

18 March
SPECIES IN DECLINE – BRITAIN
http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/environme...sp?story=502762
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3520372.stm
Two new studies of UK wildlife provide alarming evidence that many animal and plant species in Britain are in sharp decline due to human activity. The authors of one report claim their findings support the hypothesis the world could be in the midst of a sixth mass extinction.
Falls in numbers of butterfly, bird and plant species could be due to habitat destruction and climate change. Details of the studies are outlined in the latest issue of Science magazine. In one study, researchers analysed data from six surveys of UK butterfly, bird and plant species produced over the last 40 years.
The argument amongst some naysayers is that... insects are nowhere near as vulnerable to extinction as plants, birds and mammals. The results show this isn’t true They found the majority of butterfly species, a total of 71%, had declined over 20 years. The researchers found 54% of British bird species fell over 20 years and 28% of native plant species decreased over 40 years.

24 March
DOLPHIN DEATHS FLORIDA US
http://ap.tbo.com/ap/breaking/MGANA2368SD.html
The death toll among dolphins in Panhandle bays and beaches has climbed to 90, but the cause of the deaths remains a mystery, officials said Wednesday. Tissue analyses indicate the dolphins had been exposed to red tide, a toxic algae known to kill sea life. But more tests are pending, said Blair Mase, a coordinator for the National Marine Fisheries Service.

24 March
UNUSUAL SCORES OF SEABIRDS STARVING - ALASKA
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=stor...p/dead_seabirds
Thousands of dead or starving seabirds have fallen out of the sky or washed up on beaches along the south-central coast of Alaska, and scientists say they don’t know why.
Up to 2,000 dead or ill common murres, which resemble penguins, have been spotted this month, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Tom Van Pelt, a Fish and Wildlife Service biologist, said the recent deaths could be linked to severe weather, such as high wind and ice, or a scarcity of fish.

6 April
BIRD BEAK DEFORMITIES - ALASKA
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=stor..._beak_deformity
A bird beak deformity first recorded among black-capped chickadees near Anchorage has been increasingly seen in crows in Southeast Alaska, broadening an already mysterious phenomenon. Black-capped chickadees, Northwestern crows and 27 other species of birds in Alaska have been reported with beaks up to three times their normal length. The deformity often strikes mature birds and reduces their ability to feed and preen effectively. In many birds, the deformity leads to death.
”We don’t know what’s causing the problem,” said Colleen Handel, a wildlife biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey’s Alaska Science Center in Anchorage. She’s been studying the beak deformities for five years.

16 April
MIGRATING BIRDS RELY ON SUNSETS, SATRS AND MAGNETIC FIELD
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3629775.stm
US scientists believe they have made an important breakthrough in the mystery of how migrating birds manage to navigate thousands of kilometres and arrive at exactly the same spot each year. Laboratory experiments in the past have suggested the birds may use a number of cues, including sunlight, stars and the Earth’s magnetic field, which they can detect inside their bodies. But this new study, reported in the journal Science, involved tracking a group of thrushes across hundreds of miles in the American Midwest and finding out what happened when they were deliberately confused by a man-made magnet and knocked off course. Amazingly then, this study does seem to confirm that birds can “reset” their navigation systems daily by comparing the direction of the sunset with the magnetic signals they detect.
The research was conducted by William Cochran, at the Illinois Natural History Survey in Champaign, and colleagues.

12 May
THE MANTIS SHRIMPS - DORSET UK
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml.../12/ixhome.html
Bathers have been warned to be on the lookout for ”kick-boxing” shrimps after a pair of the rare species was discovered off Dorset. The mantis shrimps, usually found in tropical waters, are reputed to be able to deliver punches with the force of a small calibre bullet.
Two of the three-inch long shrimps have been found in trawler nets in Weymouth Bay. Marine biologists believe that there may be a colony of them due to global warming.The shrimps have been put on public display in reinforced tanks at the SeaLife Centre at Weymouth. A spokesman said that if bathers saw the orange shrimps, they should approach them with caution. The bigger mantis shrimps are usually found in tropical areas around the equator. But the species found off the Dorset coast are probably from the Mediterranean. Chris Brown, the display supervisor at the centre, said: ”As far as we know this species has never been found off Britain.

23 May
SHEEP STILL CONTAMINATED BY CHERNOBYL - SCOTLAND
http://www.sundayherald.com/42225
Eighteen years after nuclear disaster, ban on Scots farmers selling mutton affected by radiation remains in force

8 June
AFRICAN LOCUSTS
http://www.guardian.co.uk/spain/article/0,...1233793,00.html
Spain has sent seven aircraft to help a multinational effort to contain swarms of locusts that are threatening to devastate crops in Africa and spread north through Morocco and, potentially, to Europe.
”It is a lot easier to control the plague in the desert than in Spain,” Juan Peña, the head of the Spanish project, told El País newspaper yesterday. The potential is for a plague of proportions not seen for nearly 20 years.
But some experts have warned that if the winds blow north instead, some locusts could reach southern Europe.
The last desert locust plague in the late 80s took several years’ work and more than $300m to control, according to FAO

9 June
27,000 AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS MISSING - N DAKOTA US
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/national/aps...lican%20Mystery
Wildlife officials estimate nearly 27,000 American white pelicans have abandoned their summer nesting grounds at the Chase Lake National Wildlife Refuge north of here. The question is why – and where they went.
”It’s like they packed up and left in the middle of the night – except they didn’t pack up, they just left,” said Ken Torkelson, a spokesman for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Bismarck. Left behind were thousands of eggs, which are unlikely to hatch, officials say. Chase Lake, which was designated a national wildlife refuge in 1908, is the home of the largest known nesting colony of white pelicans in North America.

FOLLOW UP ON THE DAKOTA PELICANS BY LINDA MOULTON HOWE:
http://www.earthfiles.com/news/news.cfm?ID...ory=Environment
27,000 American White Pelicans Have Disappeared from North Dakota Wildlife Refuge

UPDATE ON THE MISSING PELICANS.http://www.earthfiles.com/news/news.cfm?ID=737&category=Environment
Some may have ended up in Yellowstone.

FOUR WHITE PELICANS FROM MISSING 29,000 TRACKED BY SATELLITE
http://www.earthfiles.com/news/news.cfm?ID...ory=Environment
Four of the 29,000 pelicans had previously been wired with radio transmitters for migration research from satellites. Today I talked with Ken Torkelson, writer-editor, and spokesperson for the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bismarck, North Dakota, about what the satellite reported from those four American White Pelicans.

17 June
INSECT ENJOYS WARMER UK CLIMATE
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3815833.stm
An insect that normally inhabits warm countries has been found living and breeding in the UK, entomologists say.
The green ”shield” bug, which attacks a broad range of crops, is usually seen in the Mediterranean, Middle East, Australia, North America and Africa. Its arrival in Britain is a clear sign of climate change, claim experts from the Natural History Museum, London.
”I’m always reluctant to invoke global warming but it’s the only explanation,” said curator of beetles, Max Barclay.
Stink bugs It is a well known phenomenon that big cities such as London are a couple of degrees warmer than the surrounding countryside. The asphalt and concrete for roads, buildings, and other structures absorb the Sun’s heat, causing surface temperatures and overall ambient temperatures to rise.

25 June
STARFISH AND CRAB DEATHS - WHITE SEA RUSSIA
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/3835817.stm
Environmentalists in northern Russia have expressed concern at the latest incident of mass deaths among marine fauna on the shores of the White Sea. Russia TV reported that thousands of dead starfish and crabs have washed ashore near the village of Syuzma in the Archangel region, along a nine-mile stretch of coast.
In 1990, millions of starfish, as well as a large number of mussels, crabs, dozens of nerpa seals, seals and belugas were killed.

BROWN PELICANS DIVING INTO ASPHALT - ARIZONA US
http://www.cbc.ca/stories/2004/07/09/world/pelicans040709
PHOENIX, ARIZ. - Endangered brown pelicans, flying nnland in a search for food, have been diving into roads and sidewalks in Arizona, mistaking pavement shimmering with heat for fish-filled waterways. More than 30 of the birds have been injured over the past two weeks between Yuma and Phoenix, the Arizona Game and Fish Department’s wildlife centre said on Thursday.
”They try to land on the water, but it’s asphalt and it’s ’Bam! That doesn’t feel so good,’” Sandy Cate, the centre’s director, told the Associated Press. Wildlife officials are treating the birds for dehydration and emaciation as well as their injuries from the road plunges. Dry weather has led many waterways to dry up along the U.S. West Coast, causing food shortages for wildlife.

12 July
CLIMATE WARNING FROM THE DEEP - NORTH SEA
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/3879841.stm
Strange things are happening in the North Sea. Cod stocks are slumping faster than over-fishing can account for, and Mediterranean species like red mullet are migrating north.
Several sea birds are also in trouble. Kittiwake numbers are falling fast and guillemots are struggling to breed.
And, earlier this summer, hundreds of fulmar (a relative of the albatross) corpses washed up on the Norfolk coast, having apparently starved to death. Scientists suspect these events are linked and they are trying to work out how.
Nothing is certain yet, but some believe a dramatic change in North Sea plankton is responsible. And, what is more, they blame global warming. Broadly speaking, as global temperatures rise, cold water species are moving out and warm water species are moving in

13 July
DUCK POPULATION DROPS BY 11 PERCENT - US AND CANADA
http://www.planetark.org/dailynewsstory.cf...25990/story.htm
The duck population in the United States and Canada dropped 11 percent from a year ago as drought dried up breeding grounds, said the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Canadian Wildlife Service yesterday

15 July
HERON COLONY (BIRDS) VANISHED - WASHINGTON US
By Michael Goodspeed (Surfing the Apocalypse)
A heron colony in Point Roberts, Washington has ”VANISHED INTO THIN AIR.” This comes only weeks, of course, after the inexplicable disappearance of 28,000 pelicans from a wildlife refuge. The pelicans, of course, abandoned their eggs and nests, leaving experts totally flummoxed.
Why are these birds disappearing? Is it possible that electromagnetic influences are effecting the ”sensors” of these birds? Is it possible that this is in any way connected to the ”freak weather” experienced in many parts of the world and the US, including the southeast, which has experienced MAJOR flooding and storms over the past week? Further, is it possible that electrified material in space, perhaps attached to a larger body (i.e. asteroid) is at the root of all of this? These questions are worth asking, and will not go away. And while biologists try to figure out where the birds went, the bigger, more serious question is: Why did they leave? Biologists hold out hope the colony is just taking a year off for some reason and will re-establish itself. In the meantime they say it is critical to protect other, healthy heron colonies.

15 July
SEABIRDS MYSTERIOUSLY DYING NEAR FALSE PASS - ANCHORAGE ALASKA
Seabirds have been dying by the dozens in the Aleutian Island village of False Pass. As many as 200 dead birds of several species have been seen floating in the strait near the village or washed up on the beach. The birds started showing up on the Fourth of July weekend and so far no explanation for the deaths has been found.

20 July
PELICAN DEATH - CALIFORNIA US
http://espn.go.com/outdoors/conservation/n...20/1843064.html
California’s endangered brown pelicans are mysteriously starving to death during a bumper year for anchovies, their preferred prey, wildlife officials said. Hundreds of the ungainly sea birds appear to have flown off course in search of food during their annual migration from the Baja California peninsula to British Columbia, with young pelicans turning up in Arizona deserts, biologists said. Naturalist Sandy Cate of the Arizona Game and Fish Department said the phenomenon appears linked to an explosion in pelican numbers combined with changes in Pacific Ocean temperatures.

22 July
PIGEONS LOST DURING RACE - SWEDEN
http://www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/wo...world-headlines
Organizers of a race for homing pigeons were still scratching their heads in wonder Thursday after about 1,500 of the birds, famous for their ability to find their way home, went missing during the contest. Of the 2,000 pigeons let loose last week, only about 500 have returned to their lofts after the 150-kilometer (93 mile) flight between the cities of Ljungby and Malmoe in southern Sweden, said Lars-Aake Nilsson of the Malmoe Homing Pigeon Club. ”The weather was perfect – no rain, no thunder and no strong winds,” he said. In past races, the birds, all of which sport electronic identification tags around their feet, made the journey in about two hours. But at Sunday’s race, something went wrong.

23 July
SCRIPPS RESEARCHERS DOCUMENT SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN THE DEEP SEA
http://www.spacedaily.com/news/oceans-04t.html
Although it covers more than two-thirds of Earth’s surface, much of the deep sea remains unknown and unexplored, and many questions remain about how its environment changes over time. A new study led by scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, has shed new light on significant changes in the deep sea over a 14-year period.
Scripps Institution’s Henry Ruhl and Ken Smith show in the new issue of the journal Science that changes in climate at the surface of the ocean may be impacting communities of larger animals more than 13,400 feet below the ocean surface.

27 July
MALARIA EXPERTS ABUZZ ON GLOBAL WARMING FEARS
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=stor...ment_malaria_dc
Malaria-carrying mosquitoes were once a scourge of Shakespeare’s chilly England and even Arctic regions of the Soviet Union.
With malaria’s history of surviving in the cold, experts are at odds about how far nnland global warming may spread one of the planet’s most deadly diseases which kills a million people a year in poor countries.
U.N. reports say rising temperatures linked to human burning of fossil fuels are likely to widen malaria’s range in the tropics because mosquitoes and the parasite they pass on when sucking human blood thrive best in hot, wet climates.
But some insect experts swat those reports as simplistic.
”Temperature is only one of many, many factors in malaria, and in many cases it’s totally irrelevant,” said Paul Reiter, professor of medical entomology at the Pasteur Institute in Paris.
”Many climate scientists don’t know anything about the complexities of malaria,” he said, adding that the same applied to mosquito-borne diseases like dengue fever or West Nile virus (news – web sites).
WARMER WORLD Woodward was a co-author of a 2003 U.N. book that says climate change already kills 150,000 people a year and that the number could double by 2030. Malnutrition, diarrhea, malaria and floods were the biggest threats in a warming world.

28 July
THOUSANDS OF DEAD FISH SEEN OFF ST THOMAS BAY/DELIMARA –
http://www.timesofmalta.com/core/article.php?id=160330
A half a kilometre stretch of sea was filled with floating dead fish off Il-Hofriet (between Delimara and St Thomas Bay) last Friday, conservation biologist Adriana Vella and members of the Biological Conservation Research Foundation have reported.
They reported the sighting during scientific marine survey work around the Maltese Islands.
”While the sight of these thousands of dead fish was revolting, their stench was even worse,” Ms Vella said.
A similar incident at St Thomas Bay on Sunday was described in Parliament on Monday by Labour MP George Vella, who said the scene was disgusting and demanded an explanation from the environment minister.

30 July
GLOBAL WARMING HITS UK BIRDS
http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/environme...sp?story=546138
http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/environme...sp?story=546514
Hundreds of thousands of Scottish seabirds have failed to breed this summer in a wildlife catastrophe which is being linked by scientists directly to global warming. The massive unprecedented collapse of nesting attempts by several seabird species in Orkney and Shetland is likely to prove the first major impact of climate change on Britain.
In what could be a sub-plot from the recent disaster movie, The Day After Tomorrow, a rise in sea temperature is believed to have led to the mysterious disappearance of a key part of the marine food chain – the sandeel, the small fish whose great teeming shoals have hitherto sustained larger fish, marine mammals and seabirds in their millions.
In Orkney and Shetland, the sandeel stocks have been shrinking for several years, and this summer they have disappeared: the result for seabirds has been mass starvation. The figures for breeding failure, for Shetland in particular, almost defy belief.
More than 172,000 breeding pairs of guillemots were recorded in the islands in the last national census, Seabird 2000, whose results were published this year; this summer the birds have produced almost no young, according to Peter Ellis, Shetland area manager for the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB).
Martin Heubeck of Aberdeen University, who has monitored Shetland seabirds for 30 years, said: ”The breeding failure of the guillemots is unprecedented in Europe.” More than 6,800 pairs of great skuas were recorded in Shetland in the same census; this year they have produced a handful of chicks – perhaps fewer than 10 – while the arctic skuas (1,120 pairs in the census) have failed to produce any surviving young.
The 24,000 pairs of arctic terns, and the 16,700 pairs of Shetland kittiwakes – small gulls – have ”probably suffered complete failure”, said Mr Ellis.
In Orkney the picture is very similar, although detailed figures are not yet available. ”It looks very bad,” said the RSPB´s warden on Orkney mainland, Andy Knight. ”Very few of the birds have raised any chicks at all.”
The counting and monitoring is still going on and the figures are by no means complete: it is likely that puffins, for example, will also have suffered massive breeding failure but because they nest deep in burrows, this is not immediately obvious.
But the astonishing scale of what has taken place is already clear – and the link to climate change is being openly made by scientists. It is believed that the microscopic plankton on which tiny sandeel larvae feed are moving northwards as the sea water warms, leaving the baby fish with nothing to feed on.
This is being seen in the North Sea in particular, where the water temperature has risen by 2C in the past 20 years, and where the whole ecosystem is thought to be undergoing a ”regime shift”, or a fundamental alteration in the interaction of its component species. ”Think of the North Sea as an engine, and plankton as the fuel driving it,” said Euan Dunn of the RSPB, one of the world´s leading experts on the interaction of fish and seabirds. ”The fuel mix has changed so radically in the past 20 years, as a result of climate change, that the whole engine is now spluttering and starting to malfunction. All of the animals in the food web above the plankton, first the sandeels, then the larger fish like cod, and ultimately the seabirds, are starting to be affected.”
”It shows that climate change is happening now, [with] devastating consequences here in Britain, and it shows that reducing the pollution causing changes to the earth´s climate should now be the global number one political priority.”

http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/environme...sp?story=546514
Seabird breeding crisis spreads to England

2 Aug
MASS DEATHS OF FLAMINGOS - TANZANIA
http://allafrica.com/stories/200408030895.html
About 10,000 flamingoes have died since mid June, and preliminary investigations point to a toxin in blue-green algae eaten by the birds . THE UNIVERSITY of Dar es Salaam has sent a team of scientists to Arusha to join other experts investigating the mysterious deaths of pink flamingoes in Lake Manyara National Park.
About 10,000 flamingos have died since mid June, and preliminary investigation point to a toxin in blue-green algae eaten by
season.

4 Aug
LOCAL BEACHES AWASH WITH DEAD FISH - MARYLAND US
http://www.delawareonline.com/newsjournal/...tofdeadfis.html
http://www.thewbalchannel.com/news/3614228/detail.html
A surge of cold water generated from an offshore current killed nearly a million adult Atlantic croaker, leaving maintenance crews at local resorts with their hands full of carcasses to clean up.
In Ocean City, maintenance crews scoured the beaches Tuesday picking up and disposing of hundreds of dead Atlantic croaker – a silvery greenish and grayish fish with brassy spots – who succumbed to thermal shock.
Town Manager Dennis Dare said employees picked up about 100 dead croakers on Sunday, about 500 on Monday and ``a whole lot more’’ on Tuesday.
Dead croaker have been reported between Assateague Island and the southern Delaware beaches since Saturday.
The Maryland Department of Environment on Tuesday attributed the cause of the deaths to a sudden temperature drop in the water. No other species of fish or marine animals are believed to have been affected by exposure to the cold water temperatures, and tests for harmful algae blooms and bacteria have come up negative, according to spokesman Richard McIntire. McIntire said several hundred thousand to slightly more than a million croaker have died

6 Aug
LOCUSTS INVADE MAURITANIA AFRICA
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/3537314.stm
A swarm of locusts has invaded the Mauritanian capital, Nouakchott, after devouring crops in rural areas.
The insects – which can eat their own body weight in 24 hours – descended on the city, also stripping bare what little greenery the desert capital has.
”Within minutes, the sky was brown. Whole trees were bending over with their weight,” a resident told the BBC.
Nations across north-west Africa have appealed for aid to fight what could be the worst locust plague in 15 years.
’Biblical proportions’
The swarms turned green trees to brown skeletons in a matter of hours and even ate the grass from the pitch of the main football stadium.
Residents lit fires and rattled tin boxes filled with stones to try to chase away the insects, reports Reuters news agency

8 Aug
INSECTS POSE GRAVE THREAT - CHINA
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=stor...hina_insects_dc
Locusts, caterpillers and grubs are munching away grasslands in China’s impoverished western province of Gansu, posing the gravest threat to the area from bugs in 20 years, Xinhua news agency said Sunday.
Nearly 75,000 hectares (185,000 acres) of grasslands in five counties and cities were being attacked by the insects, an official with the local livestock and grassland protection department said.
”The plague is the most harmful over the past 20 years,” the official, Wang Wei, was quoted as saying.
”The population density in some place even reaches to 220 insects per square meter,” he said.
Experts predicted 20,000 domestic animals would face difficulty surviving the winter because of the insect attack, Wang said.
Insects had eaten almost all of the grass in three towns in Maqu County, dubbed ”the best natural meadow in Asia,” Xinhua said. In 2000, bugs only devoured about 47,000 hectares (116,000 acres), it said.

8 August
BEACHED DOLPHINS - CALIFORNIA US
http://www.cbc.ca/story/world/national/200...ins_040808.html
Authorities in Florida have had to put 30 dolphins to death after they beached themselves on an island north of Palm Beach.
”It was a very painful, very emotional and very difficult decision to make,” said Steve McCulloch, head of marine mammal research at Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution.
Thirty-six dolphins were stranded on the beach in southeastern Florida on Friday. Veterinarians and volunteers worked round-the-clock, covering the animals with wet towels. Rescuers managed to push 34 of the rough-tooth dolphins back out to sea. They swam about seven kilometres and then came ashore again.

11 Aug
MILLIONS OF LOCUSTS HEADED FOR - DARFUR AFRICA
Wed Aug 11,10:34 AM ET Add Science – Reuters to My Yahoo!
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=stor...ocusts_sudan_dc
Millions of locusts may be heading for Sudan’s Darfur region, pest control experts said on Wednesday, where violence has already created a humanitarian disaster and two million people are short of food and medicine

18 Aug
PIGEON WINGS ITS WAY TO NIAGARA FALLS - BRITAIN
A homing pigeon which flew off course during a race between France and Britain was found 3,000 miles away near Niagara Falls, its owner said today.
The wayward bird disappeared in May while flying 200 miles from France to owner Frank Brammer’s house in Gloucester.
Mr Brammer, 81, said he thought the pigeon had got lost or been killed and that he would never see it again after it failed to return home. But a few weeks later he received a phone call from a woman in Canada who said she had spotted the plastic ring on the pigeon’s leg. He said the bird must have hitched a ride with a ship as pigeons can only fly about 500 miles a day and need rest. The woman had found Mr Brammer’s phone number on the plastic ring on the pigeon’s leg when she noticed it was from Britain. The new Canadian owner said he intends to breed from the bird because he is so tame

18 Aug
LOCUST PLAGUE - AUSTRALIA
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=stor...alia_locusts_dc
Australia’s wheat farmers, fresh from battling the country’s worst drought in a century, are now threatened by a plague of locusts which have already begun to hatch from a sprawling ”nursery” in the country’s outback.
Early locust hatchings are the precursor of an expected full-scale outbreak in a few weeks’ time, which should rival the one in 2000 that spawned up to 100 billion insects, officials said.
The new onslaught is taking place in the heart of Australia’s wheat belt and on the fringe of populated areas, making it more threatening this time for farmers in the sparsely populated outback.
”It’s quite a huge area,” Heath McRae, an official with the Australian Plague Locust Commission, told Reuters on Wednesday. ”It’s been 20 years in some of those areas since people have seen locusts. There are reports of some early hatchings.”
First hatchings are in northern New South Wales (NSW), in the Lightening Ridge opal mining district near Walgett, a major wheat center. ”A serious locust situation is expected to develop in New South Wales in the spring,” the locust commission warned in its latest bulletin.








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Posted: Oct 12 2004, 03:41 AM
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Sure!

Havent seen it in a few days now, though. Probably getting ready for winter.


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Posted: Oct 12 2004, 08:02 PM
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Hi Blue Eyed, yes thanks to several people who sent in donations we were able to double our bandwith and storage here. But I've had to postpone my vacation to the Bahamas until more donations come in.
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(I'm just teasing - I have no plans for vacation)

QUOTE
If you want me to post a summary on animal anomalies or climate/earth change so far this year – pliis tell me


Please feel free to post anything at this forum that you feel is important.

It's ok if some things are duplicated, remember, not everyone reads every post or thread.

QUOTE
Can you get a flower as well as icon.


I already stole one flower from you - hehehe - got any more?

I think we have the best selection of emoticons I have ever seen - yet. And it will improve in time as I change them up to get the right combinations of emotions.

I think my choice of emoticons shows the character of the forum and what is expected of its users.

I'm glad that some of our members like them as much as I do.

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"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
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Posted: Oct 14 2004, 09:35 PM
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I'm not sure it's anomalous enough, but I'll add the alledged chupacabra link here.

http://woai.com/news/local/story.aspx?cont...A4-3C6F6C31975E


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Posted: Oct 15 2004, 04:51 PM
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Hi Blue Eyed, thank you for the informative post!

That's what this forum is for, to document what is happening in and to the world today, the lies, the deceptions and the destruction of the environment, plant and animal life.

Most people don't wish to see this happening, it's much easier to turn on the boob tube, play a video game, go to a baseball game, guzzle a few beers and stop at an all you can eat buffet, never realizing that what is happening today will affect future generations and their lives forever.




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QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
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Posted: Nov 2 2004, 08:18 AM
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QUOTE
I'm not sure it's anomalous enough, but I'll add the alledged chupacabra link here
.

Hi Prisoner,
I've not been around lately! That was a strange animal...
I posted the pictures from the article you linked:
user posted image user posted image



More strange animals:
user posted image
MYSTERY ‘MINI-MONSTER’ WASHED UP
http://www.whitehaven-news.co.uk/leisure/v...e.asp?id=133786
PARTON residents are baffled by what has been described as a “mini Loch Ness Monster” washed up on their beach. Joan Singleton, from Firth View was strolling on the foreshore near to where Lowca Beck flows out to sea when she came upon the “monster”.



I think it's sort of a sign with all these anomalous animals showing up.


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Posted: Nov 2 2004, 09:27 AM
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Here are synopsis from october:


11 okt
TONS OF DEAD FISH SPARK CREEK SHORE CLEAN-UP
http://www.gulf-news.com/Articles/Nation2....rticleID=135594
Tons of dead fish have washed ashore along the Dubai Creek and Al Mamzar Lagoon. For days, workers have been cleaning up the dead fish floating in the creek in Al Jaddaf and Al Mamzar. An executive with a marine engineering company based in Al Jaddaf said he is puzzled by the incident in which thousands of dead fish also have been found floating in the creek.“It’s been happening every day for the past few days. It looks like there’s a specific type of fish that ended up dead. And each day, we see the municipality workers pick up crates of dead fish from the creek.”An environmentalist based in Dubai blames pollution. The dead fish, however, are not due to pollution or oil spills, said Redha Hassan Salman, head of the Environment Protection and Safety Section at the Environment It is a natural phenom-enon, he said. “It is seasonal due to a change in temperature. Salman said this kind of phenomenon is common in Gulf countries and it has been going on for the last two weeks.

12 okt
REINDEER DECLINE THREATENS MONGOLIAN NOMADS
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/20...a_reindeer.html
For centuries the nomadic Tsaatan people have roamed the taiga of northern Mongolia, raising the reindeer that provide their livelihood. But untreated disease and inbreeding now threaten the reindeer herds, and today the future of the Tsaatan’s 3,000-year-old culture is uncertain. (See photos of the Tsaatan and their reindeer.) Veterinarians have determined that Mongolia’s domesticated reindeer population has fallen to 667 animals. The decline continues a decades-long trend. In 1990 there were more than a thousand reindeer. In 1977 the herd exceeded 2,000 animals.

13 okt
SWARMS OF LOCUSTS DEVASTATING CROPS MOVING
http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory?id=163342
Swarms of locusts that have devastated crops and pastures across West Africa may hit countries as far away as Pakistan, a U.N. agency said Wednesday as it announced an intensified control campaign. The desert locusts are moving into southwest Libya, southern Algeria and the borders of Morocco, the Rome-based U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization said. Other swarms were reported in the south of the Western Sahara. “This is the worst situation we have had for 15 years, and there is a serious threat to the winter harvests,” said Annie Monard, an officer with FAO’s locust group. Locusts are present every year in Africa, but this year’s swarms are especially large because of prolonged periods of heavy rainfall. The insects eat their weight in crops every day, and group together in swarms dozens of miles long.

14 okt
ANOTHER TEXAS CHUPACABRA?
http://woai.com/news/local/story.aspx?cont...A4-3C6F6C31975E
user posted image user posted image
LUFKIN, Texas -- Local animal experts are having a hard time identifying a strange looking animal killed in Angelina County on Friday -- an animal that looks eerily similar to the as yet unidentified "Elmendorf Beast" killed near San Antonio earlier this year.

14 okt
THIRD OF WORLD'S AMPHIBIANS 'ON EDGE OF EXTINCTION'
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml...requestid=29451
Almost a third of the world's frogs, toads, salamanders and other amphibians are threatened with extinction within 100 years, according to a study.That tens of thousands of years of evolution could be wiped out in a century is seen by some experts as a warning of impending environmental disaster.Amphibians are widely regarded as "canaries in the coal mine," or useful indicators of potentially harmful changes in the environment, because their permeable skin is so sensitive."Amphibians are one of nature's best indicators of overall environmental health," said Russell Mittermeier, president of US-based Conservation International (CI). "Their catastrophic decline serves as a warning that we are in a period of significant environmental degradation."The underlying cause of their deaths is not clear, according to the Global Amphibian Assessment, compiled by more than 500 scientists from over 60 nations. The key findings will be published by the journal Science.

14 okt
MYSTERY ‘MINI-MONSTER’ WASHED UP
http://www.whitehaven-news.co.uk/leisure/v...e.asp?id=133786
user posted image
PARTON residents are baffled by what has been described as a “mini Loch Ness Monster” washed up on their beach.Joan Singleton, from Firth View was strolling on the foreshore near to where Lowca Beck flows out to sea when she came upon the “monster”.She alerted friends, saying she had never seen anything like it.Jack Southam, skipper of the Whitehaven sea angling charterboat Riptide, said on seeing a photograph of it: “I have never seen anything like this in all my years at sea.”Another Parton resident told The Whitehaven News: “It seems to have a seal’s body, the tail of a whale, fins on top and sides, but also claws and really sharp teeth.”

15 okt
VANISHING SEABIRDS WORRY ARCTIC BIOLOGISTS
http://www.cbc.ca/story/science/national/2...irds041014.html
Changing ice conditions in the Arctic are forcing some kinds of seabirds to alter their eating habits, causing a drop in populations. Researchers with Environment Canada’s Canadian Wildlife Service have been monitoring several species of seabirds in the region.They say as the amount of ice cover in the Arctic continues to shrink, so could the species that depend on it for their survival. Tony Gaston, a research scientist with the Canadian Wildlife Service in Ottawa, said the ivory gull population has dropped dramatically, and now glaucous gull numbers are also declining.“The ivory gull is a specialist species and one thinks that the cause might be something that is peculiar to that species,” said Gaston. “But the glaucous begins to suggest that we’re looking at some kind of general problem for gulls in the Arctic.”Gaston added thick-billed murres on Digges and Coates Island in northern Hudson Bay are also changing their eating habits as the ice cover shrinks. In the last 10 years, they have been switching from Arctic cod, which have been declining in numbers, to fish such as capelin, which are usually found in the Atlantic Ocean.

15 okt
JUMBO FLYING SQUID DISCOVERED IN ALASKA
http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?set_id=1&cl...97834402451B225
Sitka - A large Humboldt squid caught offshore from Sitka is among numerous sightings of a species seen for the first time in waters of the Far North, and the first of the species recovered from British Columbia waters.The 1,52m Dosidicus gigas, or jumbo flying squid, was shipped this week to California to be kept for research at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History.The squid was one of a number caught with a dip net by fisherman Alan Otness and his crew on September 18 as they baited longline gear at night. They brought back some of the creatures for examination by experts.Eric Hochburg, curator of the Santa Barbara museum, said the species is usually found off Baja, California, and farther south.The farthest north the species has been reported until this year was off the coast of Eugene, Oregon, in 1997, said James Cosgrove, manager of natural history at the Royal British Columbia Museum. Before that year, the farthest north it was seen was near San Francisco, he said.Until this summer, there have been no other sightings in the north, Cosgrove said."It's unprecedented," he said. "It speaks of a fundamental change in the ocean along the coast."The museum is keeping a 1,98m, 19.9kg Dosidicus gigas in a formaldehyde tank. The purple-bodied cephalopod with eight sucker-covered arms and two curly tentacles was caught October 2.Since news of that discovery was made public, Cosgrove has received seven reports of sightings since late July of jumbo squid in north-west waters from Oregon to Alaska. Beside the Sitka catch, the squid were spotted near Yakutat and Kodiak Island."We'll try to get a handle on are they moving north with warmer waters, and then do they die out as they head north, or does the cold water constrain their northward movement?" Hochburg said. - Sapa-AP

15 okt
PLASTICS CAUSING GENDER CHANGE -EXTINCTIONS POSSIBLE
http://rense.com/general58/gender.htm
Scientists now fear that seals, dolphins, otters, birds such asperegrine falcons and even honey bees are heading towards a unisex existence that would lead to extinction. Mother Nature Is Taking Over An extraordinary feminisation process has begun to affect Britain's wildlife - and scientists warn it could ultimately dismantle the evolutionary process that has existed for 3.5billion years. A trend first noted in whelks is starting to spread rapidly among other wildlife species in the food chain. The first national survey of 42 rivers by the UK Environment Agency has just been completed and it found that a third of male fish are growing female reproductive tissues and organs. Effects were most pronounced in younger fish, raising grave implications for future stocks. More Species Sffected Scientists now fear that seals, dolphins, otters, birds such asperegrine falcons and even honey bees are heading towards a unisex existence that would lead to extinction. Blame has fallen on the increasing prevalence of a group of chemicals known as endocrine disruptors. These are found in plastics, food packaging, shampoos and pesticides and accumulate in the environment. They can mimic the female hormone oestrogen when ingested. A reduction in the size of male genitals, a lower sex drive and parts of the testes turning into ovary tissue are among the symptoms. As the effect of the chemicals starts to creep up the food chain, concern will mount over the potential effect on human health amid increasing evidence of falling sperm counts and infertility among men.

Scientists Find Fish With Both Male and Female Sex Tissue Near Some Colorado Treatment Plants
http://abcnews.go.com/wire/US/ap20041003_1052.html
DENVER Oct. 3, 2004 — Fish with both male and female sex tissue have been discovered near Colorado wastewater treatment plants on the South Platte River and Boulder Creek. Scientists are trying to determine if chemicals that disrupt hormones, such as estrogen, are responsible for the gender-bending phenomenon. Over the last 10 years, scientists have documented the impact of endocrine disrupters on everything from British trout to alligators and polar bears. Little research has been done, however, on the effects of chronic low-dose estrogen exposure on humans

18 okt
LOCUST CRISIS 'COULD GET WORSE'
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/3754492.stm
United Nations officials are warning that Africa's locust crisis could be even worse next year, and are urging countries to be better prepared. The insects have devastated crops across West Africa in recent months. Experts of the UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), meeting in Senegal on Monday, said the insects were moving north to breed. They predict that the swarms will expand next year in Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Libya, then move south. The FAO representative in Senegal, Edouard Tapsoba, said the situation could last for a couple of years. "We should not think we are at the end of the story," he said. less.

20 okt
MONSTER WASHES UP NEAR FAREWELL SPIT
http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,3070756a10,00.html
user posted image
A sunfish that washed up near the base of Farewell Spit is a monster with a strange sense of timing, a marine expert says. The 3m sunfish was discovered at Taupata Creek near Puponga by passers-by on Sunday. Department of Conservation worker and Pakawau resident Heather Gunn said she was driving past when she saw “a big lump” on the beach, which she initially thought to be a whale. “It looked fresh. It did not smell and it had not been pecked over.” A sunfish washed up on Farewell Spit at Christmas 2002, and another was washed up on Pakawau Beach about four years ago. DOC marine specialist Andrew Baxter said the most recent sunfish discovery was “a real oddity” because of the time of year. “The literature says they can be found in New Zealand’s north-eastern waters in warm summers, and they can stray south of Cook Strait. But this is definitely not a warm summer, rather a cold spring.” Mr Baxter said sunfish could grow up to 3m long and weigh up to a tonne. After seeing a photograph of the sunfish, Mr Baxter estimated it was between 2m and 3m long

20 okt
DECLINE HITS NORTH AMERICAN BIRDS
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/3759690.stm
More than 30% of North America's bird populations are in "significant decline" according to conservationists. The National Audubon Society's State of the Birds report draws on data collected between 1966 and 2003 for 654 American bird species. The report looked at birds inhabiting grasslands, shrublands, forests, waterways and urban settings. The report says the declines are abnormal and not part of the cyclical rise and fall in bird populations. Most disturbing was the finding that 70% of bird species living in grasslands - such as the Eastern Meadowlark, Bobolink, Short-eared owl and Greater Prairie-Chicken - are doing poorly. The report found that for shrubland birds - including the Northern Bobwhite, Painted Bunting and Florida Scrub-Jay - 36% of species are declining significantly. Pit canary Smaller declines were noted in bird species living in forests, wetlands and urban areas. Instead, they may be caused by the loss of native grasslands, overgrazing of grassland and shrubland, development of wetlands, bad forest management, invasive species, pollution and poor land use decisions. "Like the canary in the coal mine warning the miner of danger ahead, birds are an indicator of environmental and human health," said Audubon president John Flicker. "People created these problems and people can solve them if we act now." The data contained in the report comes from the national Breeding Bird Survey counts from 1966 to 2003. The survey is coordinated and analysed by the US Geological Survey. The report calls for more protection for the birds' habitats and increased conservation efforts by private landowners and homeowners. DECLINES IN NORTH AMERICAN BIRDS 70% of grassland species declining significantly 36% of shrubland species declining significantly 25% of forest species declining significantly 13% of wetland species declining significantly 25% of urban birds declining significantly

20 okt
ORNITHOLOGISTS IN THE DARK ABOUT MYSTERIOUS DECLINE OF BRITISH OWLS
http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/environme...sp?story=573921
Mysterious, mournful, malevolent; but also wise, warm and wonderful. A raft of adjectives is needed to capture the complex emotions aroused in us by owls, perhaps the most enigmatic of all wild birds.

23 okt
ZOO 'SAFE' AFTER 100 TIGERS FALL TO BIRD FLU
http://news.independent.co.uk/world/asia/s...sp?story=575227
Almost 100 endangered tigers have died or been culled at a Thai zoo after an outbreak of bird flu, but officials yesterday said the virus was under control.The tigers became sick at the private Sriracha Tiger Zoo in central Chonburi province after eating raw chicken carcasses believed to be infected. The zoo was home to 441 tigers before the deaths began last week.Some 83 dead tigers, including at least 18 killed by lethal injection, were confirmed bird flu victims, said Preecha Rattaporn, of the government's Wild Animal Protection and Conservation Centre. Eleven others were buried without tests.He added. "The situation is under control now; only five to six tigers are still sick. I think no more than five more tigers will die from bird flu."Surviving tigers were being protected with a common flu vaccine also used by humans.Mr Rattaporn said suspicions voiced by some animal activists that the body parts from the tigers - valued as traditional medicine - had been retained and sold were unjustified. Only parts of their lungs had been saved for laboratory testing.Bird flu this year has killed 11 people in Thailand and 20 in Vietnam and forced the culling of tens of millions of birds.Although the virus has most commonly been found in chickens, scientists fear it could mutate with a human virus, sparking a global pandemic.Last month Thailand announced its first probable case of human-to-human bird flu transmission. Experts fear the virus is entrenched in the region.

21 okt
PLUMED PUZZLE: WHY ARE EUROPE’S BOOTED EAGLES MIGRATING NORTH?
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=stor...te_041021161146
European birdwatchers are scratching their heads over why a particular species of bird, the booted eagle, is migrating north this winter instead of the balmier south.According to the Bird Protection League (LPO), nearly 1,000 of the rare eagles have been spotted in southern France over the past two weeks – more than 30 times the normal number – after reversing their normal September movement which should see them head to Africa and India. The bizarre phenomenon has never been seen before, the LPO stressed Thursday. Speculation that the birds, which have a wingspan of up to 1.3 metres (4.3 feet), might have been affected by weather disturbances linked to global warming has butted up against the fact that no other species appears to be having the same navigation trouble. Normally, the booted eagle (Hieraaetus pennatus) spends the warmer months of the northern hemisphere breeding in southern Europe and parts of north Africa. Come September, the raptor flies south to escape the chill, with a migratory peak around the middle of the month. The eagles, which mate for life, are listed as an endangered species

21 okt
FARMLAND BIRD DECLINE ‘SLOWING’
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3763624.stm
The UK government says that the severe decline in Britain’s farmland bird populations is slowing down. The latest figures from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) show that farmland birds are at 60% of their 1970 level. But Defra say the decline has slowed in recent years and the 2003 figure is virtually unchanged from 1993. However, the RSPB called the sharp decline in farmland birds over the last three decades “a national disgrace”. The figures were contained in overall headline indicators for Britain’s wild bird populations in 2003, which were released on Thursday. Overall, UK wild bird populations were 6% higher in 2003 than in 1970, similar to the value for 2000. Scarce birds such as the woodlark and the Dartford warbler are on the increase, says the government. But it admits that much more work needs to be done. But the RSPB said the 6% increase masked “important concerns about some birds which are still declining”. “The fact that, overall, we have lost six out of every 10 pairs of birds nesting on farmland since 1970 is a national disgrace,” said Dr Mark Avery, the RSPB’s Director of Conservation. ‘

21 okt
STATE OF THE BIRDS USA 2004
http://www.audubon.org/bird/stateofthebirds/
How are our nation’s birds really faring? Audubon’s science team has pooled the best data available since Silent Spring to report on their overall health. Depending on the habitat in which they live, they could be flying high or sinking fast.MethodologyThis report sums up the status of 654 bird species native to the continental United States according to the country’s four major types of natural habitat—grass, shrubs, trees, and water. Urban habitat, which is increasing more rapidly than any other type, is also included; the ability of birds to adapt to it has become a major factor for their survival. An additional 46 species native to the continental United States use a variety of habitats and were not part of the analysis.The population trends reported for each bird species and in the pie charts of increasing and decreasing species within habitats are based on national Breeding Bird Survey data from 1966 through 2003. Coordinated and nalysed by the U.S. Geological Survey, this annual count provides a comprehensive picture of population change for more than half of all non-game species. Estimates of each species’ population were calculated by the four bird-conservation initiatives for wetlands and wood mentioned below. Audubon has also correlated many of these trends with our own Christmas Bird Count, and that initial analysis supports these findings. In these web pages, we include the full report from the magazine, plus tables of WatchList species that prefer each of the five habitat types (grass, shrubs, woods, water, and urban). These results do not take into account loss in each of these habitat typles prior to 1966, when most of America’s wetland loss, and much of the loss of America’s forestland, occurred. This may appear to indicate that loss of habitat and declines in bird species in forests and wetlands is not severe, but this is not the case. The loss of habitat and bird declines in these areas was more severe in the decades before 1966. All declines catalogued in “State of the Birds” are compounded upon earlier losses, and wetland and forest species continue to suffer from the effects of poor land management.All species were assigned to one of three color-categories: green (of no or low conservation concern), yellow (of moderate concern), or red (of high concern). These designations were based on assessments conducted by Partners in Flight, Waterbirds for the Americas, the U.S. Shorebird Council, and the North American Waterfowl Management Plan. Species in the green category are so widespread that their survival is not now in question; at the same time, many of them are experiencing startlingly rapid and precipitous declines. Birds in the red and yellow categories comprise the Audubon WatchList of species at risk. Red species are of the highest conservation concern, because they suffer small population and range size, and declining population trends, and because they face major threats. Yellow species are of high concern for the same reasons, but their problems are not as severe. A pie chart to the right of each habitat description (grass, shrubs, woods, water, and urban)shows the proportion of that habitat’s species classified as green, yellow, and red.

22 okt
WORLD WILDLIFE FALLS 40% DUE TO HUMANS
http://news.scotsman.com/scitech.cfm?id=1225562004
THE number of wild animals across the world has plummeted by 40 per cent in the past 30 years because of changes in the way humans are living. The Living Planet Report, compiled by the conservation organisation WWF, shows that over-consumption and exploitation of natural resources, known as the ecological footprint of a country, has had a major impact on wildlife and habitats across the globe. More than 1,000 terrestrial, marine and freshwater species were studied to reveal an average decline of 40 per cent between 1970 and 2000. The figures make grim reading for those concerned about the environment, and some habitats have fared extremely poorly, with freshwater species declining by 50 per cent, and grassland, savannah, desert and tundra species declining by over 60 per cent. None has avoided an overall dramatic reduction in populations, the report shows. Species with dramatically declining numbers include many that are already threatened due to man’s negative influence, such as sea turtles, polar bears and tigers. Accompanying the report is a league table detailing the ecological footprint of 150 nations, from the worst consumers to those that use the least resources per person. Surprisingly, the United States has been pushed into second place, with the United Arab Emirates now taking the top spot for the most profligate nation. The rate of consumption in the UEA is such that each resident requires 9.9 global hectares (gha) for the resources that they use. In the US each person requires 9.7gha. Scotland is 16th in the table, with each resident having an ecological footprint of 5.35gha, while the figure for the UK as a whole is 5.4gha. Afghanistan exerts the smallest footprint, at just 0.3gha per person. Global demands on natural resources have more than doubled within 40 years, with a rise of 700 per cent in energy requirements for coal, gas and oil over the last 30 years. Elizabeth Leighton, the senior policy officer with WWF Scotland, said: “The Living Planet Report is the FTSE index for the environment. It gives us a clear picture of the true impact that we are having on the world’s species and habitats with our inexhaustible consumption demands. ”Somebody else, somewhere else, is paying the price of our consumption rates in Scotland, whether it is the people who live in the rainforest in Brazil, the hippo in Uganda or the savannah of South America. This report proves that complacency over our consumption rates is unjustified and that we all have a vital role to play in protecting the natural resources of the planet: we are in ecological overdraft spiralling towards bankruptcy.” Shiona Baird, the Green Party’s speaker on enterprise, said: “This report shows how we are wasting valuable resources. We currently need two extra planets to sustain consumption – we must all take responsibility for changing that. This is not about making any dramatic lifestyle changes, it is about making the most of the materials and items we use every day.”

22 okt
CANADA TO PROTECT SLUG, WHALE, ENDANGERED SPECIES
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=stor...ment_canada_dcT
he North Atlantic right whale, western wolverine and the dromedary jumping-slug on Canada's Pacific coast will soon share a dubious distinction.
They are among 76 species Canadian environmental officials said on Friday they planned to add to an official list of animals and plants that are environmentally threatened or at risk of complete extinction. The decision will bring to 309 the number of species that receive special protection, and the government is considering a recommendation to add 44 more species next year. "This is by no means a happy announcement," said Trevor Swerdfager, of Environment Canada. Canada's Species at Risk Act, which took full effect in June, makes it illegal to kill or capture a protected species or destroy its habitat. Canada is home to more than 70,000 known plant and animal species, many of which are unique to the country, environmental officials say. Some of the species, such as the wolverine, are considered only of "special concern," while the population and habitat of others, like the right whale, and have declined so much they are listed as "endangered." The dromedary jumping-slug is considered "threatened." For four of the 76 species the protection may come too late, and they are classified as "extirpated" -- destroyed completely. Officials acknowledged the public was probably unaware some of the creatures or plants existed at all.

23 okt
SARS CAME FROM S. CHINA CIVET CATS -- STUDY
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2...tent_385042.htm
Civet cats were confirmed to be host of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreaks in south China's Guangdong Province in late 2002, but the animal was harmless in north China.Professor Zhong Nanshan, a Guangzhou-based medical expert, who helped control and treat SARS during the outbreaks, made the remark at a seminar on lung diseases recently held in Guangzhou, capital city of Guangdong Province. Studies of 103 civet cats' blood samples collected across China show that 70 percent of the sampled civet cats from Guangdong Province possessed SARS virus while cats from other places such as north China's Hebei Province and east China's Jiangxi Province were free of the virus, said Zhong. The study, being conducted this year, also found that the SARS virus separated from Guangdong civet cats is of the same as that of SARS patients affected in previous outbreaks, reports Information Daily. The research of experts from Guangdong and Hong Kong indicates that many of the earliest SARS patients were civet-cats-contactingcooks and foreign traders, further stamping civet cats as the probable source of SARS epidemic. Currently, it is unclear whether civet cats are source of the deadly SARS disease and how the SARS virus was transmitted from civet cats to human beings, said the professor. Guangdong Province has launched a preventive plan including a ban on consumption of civet cats in local restaurants to avoid newSARS outbreaks this winter.

25 okt
BIOLOGISTS ARE CONCERNED THE NORTHERN SNAKEHEAD COULD THREATEN THE GREAT LAKES ECOSYSTEM
http://www.enn.com/today.html?id=241
user posted image
A fish known for its voracious appetite and ability to wreak havoc on freshwater ecosystems was found in Chicago's Burnham Harbor, alarming state biologists.An angler caught the 18-inch fish recently and thought it looked peculiar, so he posted a picture of it on the Internet. Scientists recognized it as a northern snakehead, a native of China, Korea, and Russia.Officials said they would scan the harbor near Lake Michigan with electronic equipment to verify whether other northern snakeheads are present. If so, they are concerned the fish could multiply and gobble up native fish."I'm hoping this is just a random fish dumped out of an aquarium by somebody who didn't know what to do with it," said Tom Trudeau, head of the Lake Michigan fisheries program at the state Department of Natural Resources. "The fear is seeing their young in the lake. If that happens, we're in trouble."The northern snakehead can grow to more than 3 feet long and has large teeth and a voracious appetite for other fish. It is usually imported for food or aquariums.Scientists call it a "frankenfish" for its ability to survive in oxygen-depleted water, move from pond to pond, and devour other fish.Chicago imposed a ban on northern snakeheads two years ago after an angler discovered one in Maryland. The fish have also been spotted in Philadelphia and Wisconsin.

28 okt
TASMANIA RECORDS MOST WHALE STRANDINGS
http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200410/s1229413.htm
Tasmania appears to be the whale-stranding capital of Australia, with more than 80 per cent of all recorded beachings occurring in the state.The annual report from the state's Department of Primary Industries shows more than 30 strandings occurred during the past year.Stranded species include pilot, beaked and sperm whales, as well as bottlenose and common dolphins.


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Posted: Nov 2 2004, 10:57 AM
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Thanks, Blue Eyed for keeping us informed about what is happening to our environment. It is all bad, bad, bad. One thing that caught my attention was this:

QUOTE
As the effect of the chemicals starts to creep up the food chain, concern will mount over the potential effect on human health amid increasing evidence of falling sperm counts and infertility among men.


They are a little late in admitting this. For years, women have had to have fertilized eggs implanted to even have babies! Viagra was a big seller. Men are having prostate problems in ever-increasing numbers. It doesn't help that the residue from Viagra and birth control pills, among other drugs, is going down the sewers and entering the water supply. Can't be helping the fish, either.

Birds are eating GM grains. ????? The whole earth has been polluted.

BJ


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Posted: Dec 11 2004, 10:06 AM
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1 nov
WARMING BRINGS PLAGUE OF HORNETS ...UK
http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/environme...sp?story=578083
Climate change is thought to be causing the return of Britain's most formidable flying insect, the hornet.

1 nov
SWARMS OF LOCUSTS HIT LEBANON FOR FIRST TIME SINCE WORLD WAR I
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=stor..._cyprus_locusts
Swarms of red locusts have been sighted on the coast of Lebanon for the first time since World War I, but environmental experts played down any danger for the country's agricultureThe swarms arrived in Jbail, some 30 kilometres (20 miles) north of Beirut, state television said. Neighbouring Cyprus was swarmed Monday by red locusts from North Africa that officials said had caused untold damage to crops. Agriculture officials said the locusts, believed to be from North Africa, were first spotted in the Akamas nature reserve in northwest Cyprus but moved swiftly towards the southern coastal town of Limassol.
-snip-
Locusts ravaged Lebanon between 1914 and 1918 causing a famine which sparked a wave of emigration to North and South America.

2 nov
SECOND ONSLAUGHT OF LOCUSTS HITS CYPRUS
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=stor...prus_locusts_dc
Areas of Cyprus were covered by millions more desert locusts on Tuesday as the insects moved north of their African habitats in search of greener pastures.The locust invasion, which locals say is the first in living memory, first began on Sunday. A new and larger swarm arrived on the west coast of the island on Tuesday afternoon. "There are millions of them. It is like looking at a very, very dense net," said Andreas Kazantzis, a senior officer of the Agriculture Ministry in the region of Paphos.

2 nov
ENDANGERED SPECIES LIST GROWING, SAYS GREEN GROUP
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=stor...conservation_dc
The world's list of endangered species is growing at an alarming and unprecedented rate as governments pay less and less attention to green issues, a major global environmental body said on Tuesday.The World Conservation Union, which also goes under the acronym IUCN, said it would release a "red list" of more than 12,000 threatened species at the World Conservation Congress in Thailand, which starts on November 17. "The scale and pace of extinction is higher now than ever before. Research indicates that the rate could even be up to 1,000 times higher than we would naturally expect," IUCN Director General Achim Steiner told a news conference. With up to 30 per cent of the world's species facing extinction in the next 50 years, the IUCN said it would also release a damning report on what it says is shrinking government investment in conservation.

2 nov
GIANT SQUID 'TAKING OVER WORLD'
http://www.news.com.au/common/story_page/0...13762%2C00.html
GIANT squid are taking over the world, well at least the oceans, and they are getting bigger. According to scientists, squid have overtaken humans in terms of total bio-mass. That means they take up more space on the planet than us. The reason has been put down to overfishing of other species and climate change. A report in the Australian science journal, Australasian Science, said marine researchers are now in universal agreement that cephalopods have been given an advantage not available to any other sea creature. And as a result they have been allowed to flourish. Their growth rates also seem to be increasing as is their body size. The findings may offer an answer to the mysterious appearance of a giant squid on the coast of Tasmania last week and hundreds of squid washed ashore on the coast of California this week, although El Nino is also being partly blamed.
-snip-
Overfishing of some fish species has taken away competition for the squid in finding food resources. The warming of waters due to climate change have also allowed squid to expand their populations.
-snip-
The Food and Agricultural Organisation of the UN supports the theory claiming squid landings have been increasing over the past 25 years at greater rates than fish.

4 nov
ANTARCTIC FOOD CHAIN AT RISK
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,...1342782,00.html
Penguins, whales and seals in the Antarctic Southern Ocean could go hungry because of global warming, say scientists, who warn that the population of krill, at the heart of the food chain, has fallen about 80% since the 1970s. They say the most likely reason for the decline of the shrimp-like crustacean is to do with the sea ice around the Antarctic peninsula, where the air temperature has risen by 2.5C (4.5F) in the past 50 years. Krill feed on algae beneath the ice, which also provides shelter. Angus Atkinson, a biologist with the British Antarctic Survey, who led the research, said: "We don't fully understand how the loss of sea ice here is connected to the warming, but we believe it could be behind the decline in krill." The team, whose study is published today in Nature, looked at the scientific fishing records of nine countries working in Antarctica, involving a total of nearly 12,000 net hauls from 1926-39 and from 1976-2003. "There is only roughly a fifth of the krill around now that were around in the mid-70s," Dr Atkinson said. The drop in krill numbers could explain declines in several species of penguin.
-snip-
The vanishing ice in the winter has resulted in an 80 percent drop in the number of Antarctic krill, a shrimp-like crustacean that is a major source of food for animals in the region.

5 nov
FUNGUS THREATENS TASMANIAN FROGS
http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200411/s1235196.htm
It is believed the chytrid fungus, which has caused the extinction of several Australian species, has now arrived in Tasmania.It attacks the tadpole mouths and causes skin ulcers in frogs.Scientists have begun surveying tadpoles throughout the state to see if they are infected.Central North Field Naturalists spokesman Jim Nelson says frog numbers in Tasmania are rapidly declining, and many species are on the threatened species list. “We’re very worried about the green and gold frog, it’s disappeared entirely from the north-west,” he said.“When a frog disappears from an entire area like that you can almost bet there’s a disease process involved. “If it’s this chytrid fungus then it’s very serious because it’s been a very serious disease from frogs like the green and gold frog around the world.”

5 nov
BIRDS DIE BY THE THOUSANDS NEAR THE GREAT SALT LAKE
http://www.4utah.com/local_news/local_head...17-E8333A3A656D
A vian cholera is killing thousands of birds on Great Salt Lake. State wildlife officials say the outbreak is among the biggest in years. The disease is lethal to waterfowl and other water birds, but does not affect humans. About 30,000 eared grebes have died on the lake in the latest outbreak. Each fall, about 1.5 million of the small diving birds settle on the lake for ilometres before continuing their travel south. The lake gives the birds enough food for them to double their weight before they head on to the southwest and into Mexico. Avian cholera is one of the most common diseases among wild North American waterfowl. Once birds are infected, they die quickly, sometimes within six to 12 hours.

5 nov
DOLPHINS WASHED ASHORE ON VENEZUELA’S MARGARITA ISLAND
http://www.planetsave.com/ViewStory.asp?ID=5431
Eight dolphins died this week when they were washed ashore on Venezuela’s Margarita Island, some 240 miles (400 kilometers) northeast of Caracas, an environmental ministry official said.Thirteen pantropical spotted dolphins were discovered Tuesday on a beach on Margarita Island, a popular tourist destination off Venezuela’s Caribbean shore, Carmen Heredia, a marine biologist for the Environment Ministry, said Thursday.

7 nov
RARE DOLPHIN IS A MALE SAY SCIENTISTS
http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200411/s1236516.htm
Scientists say a rare dolphin found on Kangaroo Island last Monday was probably a fully grown adult male.Dr Katherine Kemper from the South Australian museum and Professor Roger Byard from the Forensic Science Centre carried out an autopsy on the southern right whale dolphin yesterday.It is the first time this type of dolphin has been found in South Australia. The animal usually inhabits the deep waters around Antarctica.Dr Kemper says the find gives scientists a great opportunity to find out more about the relatively unknown species.“This animal is 2.4 metres long and it appeared to be an adult male, by the size of its reproductive organs, so that in itself is interesting because there are just so few specimens available anywhere in the world to say how big an animal has to be before it’s an adult,” she said

8 nov
MANY OF EUROPE’S BIRDS IN DANGER OF VANISHING: REPORT
http://www.cbc.ca/story/science/national/2...rds_041108.html
Almost half of the species of birds in Europe are at risk of disappearing, according to a new report. The latest assessment by BirdLife International, an umbrella organization of conservation groups, says 226 species of birds on the continent, or about 43 per cent, are in danger of being wiped out. Birds are excellent environmental indicators and the continued decline of many species sends a clear signal about the health of Europe’s wildlife and the poor state of our environment,” said Clairie Papazoglou, head of BirdLife.

8 nov
EGYPT BATTLES DESERT LOCUST SWARMS FROM LIBYA
http://www.reuters.com/printerFriendlyPopu...storyID=6746498
Egypt has killed swarms of a type of locust that has infested parts of Africa and Cyprus this year, the official Middle East News Agency (MENA) reported on Monday. An Agriculture Ministry official said some of the swarms of desert locusts, which entered Egypt’s northwest coastal area last week from Libya, had been killed without damaging crops, MENA reported. The locusts were easily destroyed because they were not yet fully grown, the official said. Egypt had formed squads to deal with the locusts as soon as they were spotted on the border with Libya, the official said. Desert locusts have ravaged the countryside in countries including Mauritania, Mali and Niger this year. Swarms of the large, pink locusts have also recently arrived in Cyprus. It is thought they were carried on winds from North Africa.

8 nov
REPORT: MANY SPECIES SCRAMBLE TO ADJUST TO WARMING
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=stor...ment_warming_dc
North American wildlife species ranging from butterflies to red fox are scrambling to adapt to Earth’s rising temperatures and may not survive, according to a study released on Monday.Heat-trapping greenhouse gases emitted by vehicles, factories and other human activities have boosted Earth’s temperatures by 1 degree F over the past century, the Pew Center on Global Climate Change said in a report. To adapt, North American species like the Edith’s Checkerspot butterfly, red fox and Mexican jay are moving to colder northern climates that suit their habits, the Pew Center said, citing 40 separate scientific studies. With global temperatures expected to rise another 2.5 degrees to 10.4 degrees F by 2100, “future global warming is likely to exceed the ability of many species to migrate or adjust,” the Pew Center said. The Edith’s Checkerspot butterfly has disappeared from many southern, low-elevation areas like Mexico, fleeing to colder Canadian climes, according to the report. The red fox has also moved northward to clash with Arctic fox populations, in a trend spotted in many other birds, mammals, invertebrates and plants, it said. “These responses may alter competition and predator-prey relationships and have other unforeseen consequences,” it said. Longer growing seasons for plants will also impact the Earth’s ability to clean carbon dioxide from the air, the report said. Alaska’s tundra now emits more carbon dioxide than it absorbs because temperatures have risen by 4 degrees to 7 degrees F over the last 50 years, the report said. Wildlife officials need to expand nature reserves and improve habitat conservation efforts to give species more flexibility to adjust to changing conditions, the report said.

9 nov
ANTHRAX BEHIND UGANDA HIPPO DEATHS MYSTERY (update on earlier news)
Nearly 200 hippopotamuses are dead after an anthrax outbreak in western Uganda. Wildlife officials in the East African nation said Tuesday 194 Hippos had died In Queen Elizabeth National Park since July.The park’s chief warden John Bosco Nuwe said it took months of research and testing to determine the cause of the deaths, which was finally identified as anthrax by German scientists.

9 nov
LOCUST INVASION CAUSES CROP LOSSES IN NIGER
http://www.angolapress-angop.ao/noticia-e.asp?ID=295642
Locust invasion seriously disrupted agriculture in parts of Niger that also suffered dearth of rain this year, according to Sani Moudi, national director of the protection of plants (PV).The state-owned weekly Sahel Dimanche quoted Sani Moudi as saying that more than 205,000 hectares of farmland have been treated since 25 July and the operation is continuing.He said Niger has been confronted since July by the locust invasion that particularly affected the regions of Agadez (north), Taghoua (centre), Tillabery (west), Maradi and Zinder (east).”We don`t have precise figures on the assessment of the damage, but surveys done by FAO, the World
9 nov
GLOBAL WARMING AFFECTING ANIMAL MIGRATION, BREEDING: STUDY
http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200411/s1239685.htm
Scientists in the United States say global warming is making plants bloom earlier and animals emerge from hibernation sooner.The new study by the Pew Centre on Global Climate Change brings together the conclusions of 40 previous studies.It has found that climate change is now affecting about half of all wild species.Seeking cooler temperatures, animals are migrating north or to higher elevations and then facing new challenges as they come into contact with new species.According to the study, spring events like blooming and breeding occur on average a week earlier than they did 60 years ago.The shift coincides with a 3 degree increase in temperature.

9 nov
SEWAGE SPILL PROMPTS CONCERN FOR MIGRATORY BIRDS
http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200411/s1239386.htm
Members of Birds Tasmania will visit the site of sewage spill in the south of the state today to see whether hundreds of migratory birds have left. A major clean-up is underway at Midway Point near Hobart after tens of thousands of litres of sludge spilt into Orielton Lagoon from a sewage treatment plant.Eric Woehler from Birds Tasmania says hundreds of birds have flown from Siberia to feed and roost at the lagoon.“There are birds which are as small as something which is called a red neck stint which weighs about 15 grams or about half an ounce in the old measurement up to birds the size of an eastern ker which is about the size of a small chicken,” he said.“These birds will take between four and six weeks to fly between Siberia and Tasmania every year.”

9 nov
MALE FISH BECOMING FEMALE
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/6436617/
Researchers in Colorado have made a startling discovery. Fish, apparently male, are developing female sexual organs. Scientists believe it’s the result of too much estrogen in the water and they’re finding estrogen in rivers across the country.In Colorado’s rivers and streams, scientists are waist-deep in ritual of the season, using electric currents to stun native fish to the surface where they’re measured and checked. But what they discovered in the white sucker fish has got even veteran scientists concerned.“I’ve done a lot of studies throughout my career which extends back to 1973,” says research associate John Woodling. “This is the very first time that what I’ve found scared me.”“This fish has characteristics of both male and female,” says Dr. David O. Norris of the University of Colorado, Boulder.And scientists have found lots of them in three Colorado rivers, all of them downstream from sewage treatment plants.In the Boulder Creek, female white suckers outnumbered males five to one and 50 percent of the males also had female sex tissue.Researchers say the cause is too much estrogen in the water, a natural female hormone that is found in every sewer system. But also, they say, certain chemical compounds in detergents and soaps can mimic estrogen.Barbara Biggs, of Denver’s largest sewage plant, says most of the nation’s sewage plants simply can’t remove all the estrogen in the water.“We’re concerned about the effect on aquatic life, but we’re also concerned about our ability to actually treat for these estrogens and estrogen mimickers,” says Biggs.Estrogen mimickers are believed to be caused by chemicals called nonylphenols, found in everything from paints and rubber to cosmetics and plastics. They are considered a possible cause of kidney, eye, liver and reproductive problems. They’ve been banned in much of Europe and are under review in Canada, but are still common in America, where they are flowing out of sewage plants and into clean water flowing into America’s rivers.Government researchers recently found natural estrogens and estrogen mimickers in 80 percent of the streams they tested in 30 states.“We would be ingesting those chemicals, would absorb them, and they would add to whatever natural hormones we already have in the body,” says Dr. Norris.No one is certain what the impact is on humans. But since finding evidence that estrogen may be turning male fish into female fish, scientists are now looking at what it means for the nation’s drinking water.In a state that prides itself on living in harmony with nature, this is evidence, say researchers, of a hormonal imbalance

9 nov
BIRDWATCHERS IN AWE OVER FISH EAGLE SIGHTING
http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?set_id=14&c...01958513C598931
The beautiful brown-and-white African fish eagle is an icon of the continent, with its mournful, evocative cry that is one of Africa’s most instantly recognisable sounds.Now, bird lovers are eagerly anticipating the cries of a demanding young fish eagle echoing across the Zandvlei nature reserve between Lakeside and Muizenberg in the Western Cape – possibly even this week.This is because they’ve been watching the development of a chick in the nest of a pair of fish eagles which spend much of their time in and around the reserve.The nest was found by Ann Koeslag and companions at an undisclosed location in Tokai Forest after painstaking ornithological detective work.

10 nov
NEW FUNGAL DISEASE THREATENS BRITAIN'S 200M OAKS
http://news.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtm.../10/noaks10.xml
A new disease has been found in native oak trees in Cornwall, raising fears for Britain's 200 million oaks and other native trees which may turn out to be susceptible.The fungal disease is related to Phytopthera ramorum, the disease known in the United States as "sudden oak death," but that disease has never been shown to affect native British oaks.The new pathogen was first discovered in the wood near Redruth last year, when it was found on rhododendron plants and a beech tree. Following its discovery last week on two native oaks, two further oak trees are being monitored in the same area.The disease is so new that it does not yet have a formal scientific name. But the tree pathologist who discovered it, Clive Brasier, of the Forestry Commission's research agency, has called it Phytopthera kernovii - the ancient name for Cornwall. The disease is so far thought to be specific to Britain.

12 nov
WOES OF WARMING ARCTIC TO ECHO WORLDWIDE VIA BIRDS
http://www.planetark.com/dailynewsstory.cf...28114/story.htm
The decline of migratory birds due to an accelerating Arctic thaw may also disrupt the delicate ecosystems of their far-flung winter homes from Africa to South America, experts said this week“Birds adapted to the high Arctic tundra are especially at risk,” Hans Meltofte of Denmark’s National Environmental Research Institute told Reuters at a conference reviewing an eight-nation report on global warming’s impact in the Arctic. In the long term, global warming is likely to let forests grow further north in the Arctic, squeezing the tundra breeding grounds of shorebirds – like curlews, sandpipers or red knots – into a narrowing belt bounded by the Arctic Ocean. The report says the Arctic is heating twice as fast as the rest of the globe and that the warming “will have implications for biodiversity around the world because migratory species depend on breeding and feeding grounds in the Arctic.” Several hundred million birds migrate every year thousands of km (miles) to the Arctic to breed, largely because the chill region is almost free of egg-eating predators. They spend the Arctic winter in places from Patagonia to Mauritania. “The bar-tailed godwit can fly from Alaska to New Zealand with no stops,” Meltofte said. Populations already rise and fall according to the availability of food in the build-up to the giant flight, lasting almost a week. “The birds don’t want to go to the Arctic but they have to go to breed,” Meltofte said. “Imagine if two million shorebirds stayed and laid eggs on the ground in Mauritania. The chicks would be eaten by the crows, gulls or jackals.” Any decline in bird populations due to disruptions in the Arctic will affect ecosystems in the south. In the shorter term, however, a warmer Arctic may help some bird species by making food, such as insects for chicks, more available. One survey showed 12 percent of Arctic shorebird species were growing in numbers, 42 were stable and the rest falling. The gray plover is among those gaining while the spoon-billed sandpiper of eastern Siberia is endangered. Birds may be able to fly so far because few parasites live in the chill Arctic or in the salty tidal flats they favor during winter. Higher temperatures might spread parasites. “Birds have this amazing ability to build muscle without training. All mammals need hard training to build muscles, birds do it naturally, all by hormones,” Meltofte said. The Arctic report blames emissions of heat-trapping gases from burning fossil fuels for rising temperatures and says the Arctic is warming quickly because dark water and ground, once uncovered, absorb more heat than snow or ice.

12 nov
BRAZIL FORESTS SEEN DOOMED WITHOUT INT’L AID
http://www.planetark.com/dailynewsstory.cf...28115/story.htm
The forests on Brazil’s agricultural frontier will disappear without international financing to provide alternatives to slash-and-burn farming, the farm secretary of Brazil’s leading soybean state said. Fires to clear forest – a measure of deforestation – in Brazil’s center-west agricultural frontier on the edge of the Amazon doubled to 65,499 in 2003 against 2000, Brazil’s Statistical and Geographic Institute (IBGE) said last week. “Often it is much easier to reverse environmental degradation when lines of credit at low interest are available,” Homero Alves Pereira, farm secretary of Brazil’s leading soybean state Mato Grosso, told Reuters this week.

13 nov
ARCTIC WILDLIFE ON THE BRINK OF CATASTROPHE
http://news.independent.co.uk/world/enviro...sp?story=581579
Polar bears, the biggest land carnivores on Earth, face extinction this century if the Arctic continues to melt at its present rate, a study into global warming has found. The sea ice around the North Pole on which the bears depend for hunting is shrinking so swiftly it could disappear during the summer months by the end of the century, the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ICIA) says.
Scientists in the study believe the survival of the estimated 22,000 polar bears in the region is hanging by a slender thread as they suffer the double whammy of chemical pollution and dwindling feeding territories. Polar bears traditionally hunt on floating sea ice for seals and other quarry. But the ice has retreated significantly during summer, so the carnivores are having to swim further from one floe to another in search of quarry

14 nov
SEA BIRDS SHOW UP IN INTERIOR
http://www.news-miner.com/Stories/0,1413,1...2535472,00.html
When Michelle Amundson found a small, strange, black-and-white bird sitting in the snow next to a four-wheeler in the Koyukuk River village of Hughes a few weeks ago, she knew something was wrong. “Right away I noticed it had webbed feet,” said Amundson, who is school principal in the village 200 miles northwest of Fairbanks. “It was like, ‘This bird is not supposed to be here.’” To make a long story short, she couldn’t have been more right. In what is akin to finding a polar bear in Fairbanks or a moose in Barrow, a pair of least auklets, sea birds that normally live in the Bering Sea, were found stranded in two Interior villages on the same day three weeks ago following a storm that battered Western Alaska. It’s the first record of a least auklet being reported inland in Alaska, according to Dan Gibson, ornithology collections manager at the University of Alaska Museum of the North.
One bird was found by Amundson in Hughes and the other was found by a man in Birch Creek, a small village 100 miles northeast of Fairbanks, said John Wright, a biologist at the Alaska Department of Fish and Game in Fairbanks who talked to the people who found the birds and coordinated their transport to Fairbanks. The birds were found alive but both died within 24 hours, he said. Hughes is about 200 miles inland and Birch Creek is about 500 miles from the coast. Experts speculate that the birds were blown inland by the storm, the worst to hit the Bering Sea coast in more than 30 years.

17 nov
NEARLY 16,000 SPECIES THREATENED WITH EXTINCTION
http://www.smh.com.au/news/Environment/Nea...l?oneclick=true
Nearly 16,000 of the world's plant and animal species face extinction largely because of the destructive behaviour of mankind, says a major new environmental report.
Over-exploitation, climate change and habitat destruction are to blame for a crisis that has wiped out at least 27 species from the wild over the last two decades, according to the World Conservation Union's (IUCN) red list of threatened species.
The report says more than 7000 animal species are threatened with extinction.
They include 32 per cent of amphibians, 42 per cent of turtles and tortoises, 23 per cent of mammals and 12 per cent of birds.
Among the casualties since last year's report, the IUCN confirms the Hawaiian thrush has gone the way of the dodo with no sighting of the bird for 15 years.
Costa Rica's golden toad has also been listed as extinct largely through climate change, pollution and disease.
More than 8000 plants are listed as threatened with the St Helena olive tree the latest to be declared extinct after the last remaining seedling withered and died in November last year without any seeds kept.

18 nov
MILLIONS OF LOCUSTS SWARM INTO EGYPT
http://www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/wo...world-headlines
In an echo of the biblical plagues, millions of locusts swarmed into northern Egypt on Wednesday for the first time in 50 years, prompting authorities to order emergency pesticide spraying to protect the region’s important agriculture industry. Clouds of the red insects, up to 2 ¾ inches long, flitted about over Cairo, while others hopped around on rooftops.

18 nov
INDONESIA’S BIRDS OF PARADISE DYING OUT, SCIENTIST SAYS
http://www.enn.com/today.html?id=405
Rampant illegal logging in Indonesia and the demands of a rapidly expanding population and economy in Indonesia are killing many of Asia’s most exotic and rare birds, conservationists said on Thursday. Birdlife Asia estimates that the sprawling southeast Asian archipelago is home to more than a third of Asia’s endangered avian species, the highest concentration in the region. ”Bird species across the Asian region are in serious trouble,” said Richard Grimmett, the head of Birdlife Asia. “Of the 332 species of birds that are endangered in Asia, Indonesia alone has some 117 species.” Speaking at a press briefing during the IUCN World Conservation Congress in Bangkok, Grimmett said the world could not afford to lose Indonesia’s unique ecosystem.

18 nov
PINE TREE PARASITE A SERIOUS THREAT
http://china.org.cn/english/2004/Nov/112582.htm
If not stopped, a tiny parasite that is killing tens of thousands of pine trees in Guangdong may cause even bigger environmental problems. Lumberjacks in the province are cutting down trees to stay ahead of nematodiasis, dubbed “forest cancer” by some, a disease that has killed more than 10,000 pine trees in the South China Botanical Garden. According to a provincial forestry official Wednesday, the disease, usually found in northern parts of the country or abroad, poses a severe threat. “Nematodiasis has been found in many cities in the province,” said Lin Duping, director of the Tree Disease Prevention and Control Department under the Guangdong Provincial Forestry Bureau. “And we actually face many difficulties in eradicating the disease, one of the three major forest diseases in the world,” Lin said.
Industry, said many pine trees affected by the scourge in the city have withered. It may have affected more than

19 nov
CANE TOADS INVADE NORTHERN NSW NATIONAL PARK
http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200411/s1246929.htm
Hundred of thousands of baby cane toads are swarming through a national park at Byron Bay.The toads will be destroyed to make room for two of the state’s threatened frog species.At Byron Bay this summer, the cane toad population is fast approaching plague proportions.“You should see the ground down there [at Arakwal National Park], it is just black and it is just moving, it is a seething mass of young cane toads, it looks like the ground is moving,” ecologist Steve Phillips said.But the National Parks Service is making a move too, trying to humanely destroy as many as it can before the young ones morph into adults.During the next week hand collection of the toads is expected to make a big difference to the population.With the toads out of the way, national parks hopes local numbers of the threatened wallum froglet and wallum sedge frog will pick up.

19 nov
ENDANGERED ELUSIVE BIRD MAKES A COMEBACK
http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?set_id=1&cl...00874600406B251
London – The corncrake, a grassland-dwelling bird once on the brink of extinction in Britain, is making a strong comeback thanks to conservation efforts, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) said on Friday.A survey this year recorded 1 067 corncrakes, up 28 percent in just a year and significantly more than the paltry 470 found in 1993 when the species was deemed all but extinct.”This year’s increase suggests that the practices we have researched and developed over the years to encourage corncrakes are working extremely well,” RSPB director in Scotland Stuart Housden said in a statement.However, while the surge in population was welcome, the fact remained that most of the migratory birds were confined to limited breeding areas in Scotland, with just a handful elsewhere in the British Isles.The corncrake, one of 17 bird species breeding in Europe which are globally threatened in their range territories, winters in East Africa and returns to Europe in April or May.To make conservation efforts harder, the reclusive partridge-sized bird is hardly ever seen and is therefore mainly monitored by recording the “crek-crek” call of the singing male.

21.nov
ISRAEL HIT BY WORST LOCUST PLAGUE SINCE 1950S
http://cnn.netscape.cnn.com/ns/news/story....0&w=RTR&coview=
Millions of locusts swarmed through Israel’s Red Sea resort town of Eilat on Sunday, devouring crops and flowers in the country’s south. Israeli agriculture officials sent crop dusters into the air to spray against the locusts that swept in from North Africa in the first such invasion since 1959. Eilat residents reported clouds of locusts eating palm trees bare and wiping out entire gardens. ”You watch as trees that are covered with flowers are devoured.

21 nov
WORLD’S 100 MOST DESTRUCTIVE SPECIES NAMED
http://news.independent.co.uk/world/enviro...sp?story=585082
Scientists have identified the world’s 100 deadliest invasive species, which are responsible for the extinction of hundreds of other species and causing havoc to ecosystems and the birds and mammals that inhabit them. Fish, ants, snails and even seaweed are named for their aggressive growth, biological pollution and catastrophic impact on habitats around the world.The species are published in a new and updated booklet compiled by the World Conservation Union (IUCN), one of the world’s leading conservation agencies. It will be distributed this week at the IUCN’s world conservation congress in Bangkok, where delegates will be warned of the urgent need to curb invasive species or face a world where only “hardened survivors” such as pigeons exist, at the expense of parrots and other exotic creatures.Among the leading culprits in the booklet, entitled One Hundred of the World’s Worst Species, is the Nile perch, which has contributed to the extinction of more than 200 endemic fish species in Africa by eating not only their food but also the fish themselves.

22 nov
CANBERRA, HOBART HOME TO AUSTRALIA’S WORST LITTER BUGS
http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200411/s1248811.htm
A national study on the behaviour of people who litter has found Canberra and Hobart have the highest rate of littering of Australia’s capital cities.The study by the Beverage Industry Environment Council recorded the littering habits of people across the country.It found Brisbane and Perth were the cleanest cities.The council’s Rob Curnow says his team of observers monitored behaviour at several sites across Canberra.“Part of what we do is try to get an overall picture of Canberra, so we’ve been to a number of locations from Civic bus stops, to Woden transport interchange through to Gorman House,” Mr Curnow said.

22 nov
SCIENCE TAPS INTO OCEAN SECRETS
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4033555.stm
Some 13,000 new marine species have been discovered in the past year, according to information released by an international alliance of scientists. The Census of Marine Life (COML) has also uncovered previously unknown migration routes used by fish such as tuna and shark. The $1bn 10-year project, which is building a huge database, involves researchers in more than 70 countries. The new knowledge will inform future conservation and fisheries policies.“We’re just skimming the surface,” said Dr Ron O’Dor, Chief Census Scientist, based in Washington DC, US. “We know something about the first 100m at this point but we know almost nothing about what lies down in the deep. “Our analysis shows that if you catch a fish below 2,000m it is 50 times more likely to be new to science,” he told the BBC News website. Map of life The census has seen an exponential growth in knowledge in the 12 months since it issued its last progress report. Some specimens are pulled up on trawls, counted and catalogued. Other organisms are even tagged and tracked. A remarkable picture of how life operates in the deep is beginning to emerge. “In some of the results we’ve had you can see a kind of doughnut of circulation which seems to concentrate life in deep water,” explained Dr Fred Grassle of Rutgers University, US, who chairs the Census’ International Scientific Steering Committee. “The doughnuts were 10km in diameter and thousands of metres below the surface.” The project’s Ocean Biographic Information System database now includes more than 5.2 million new and previously existing records of the location, date and depth at which a marine species was found – a rise of 1.1 million entries. The information has allowed the COML to create a map of the distribution of 38,000 marine species, from plankton to whales. Vast areas of the world’s oceans have yet to return any data at all. One survey, however, on the mid-Atlantic Ridge, recorded 80,000 specimens. It is expected to add several new fish species to the 106 marked by the census this year. Carbon storage The current total of marine fish species now stands at 15,482. Experts expect the final count to total roughly 20,000 by the time the COML is completed in 2010. But fish biomass is dwarfed by that of microscopic life forms. The database now includes more than 6,800 species of zooplankton, tiny animals that drift with the currents. Microbes, the smallest organisms, astonishingly account for more than 90% of ocean biomass. Scientists believe knowledge about this aspect of marine life will prove useful in understanding climate change, as these organisms play a crucial role in taking carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere.

22 nov
GLOBAL WARMING BLAMED FOR DECLINE IN KRILL
http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?set_id=1&cl...01099065882B252
Sydney – Is it more evidence of global warming or does it just show how little we know about the ecology of Antarctica?That’s the question raised by research by the British Antarctic Survey into levels of krill in the Southern Ocean.There has been a big decline in Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba, the shrimp-like creatures that are dredged by whales and pecked up by seabirds. Fishermen also harvest the krill, a creature just 6cm-long.The research, published in the British science journal Nature, looked at estimates of the krill stock taken between 1926 and last year. Lead researcher Steve Nicol said krill stocks in the waters off the Antarctic Peninsula had declined by 80 percent since the 1970s.The decline has obvious implications for the whales, seals and seabirds that live off krill.An obvious culprit is global warming: air temperatures have gone up more than 2,5 percent in the past 50 years.Higher temperatures explain big chunks breaking off Antarctica and a decline in the amount of the ice that floats in the sea.Krill feed off the algae living underneath icebergs and floating ice fields. The reasoning is that krill have grown scarce because their food source has grown scarce. – Sapa-dpa

23 nov
RESEARCH BEGINS INTO SAVING AUSTRALIA'S SEAHORSES
http://www.abc.net.au/pm/content/2004/s1249972.htm
In some parts of Australia aquaculture firms are growing seahorses for sale. Elsewhere there's increasing worry about the fate of the creatures in the wild.Pressures on the world's seahorse population range from net fishing to the use of dried seahorse in Asian traditional medicine and as an alleged aphrodisiac. The seahorse population around Tasmania has dropped by 75 per cent since 2001, and researchers are also worried about fluctuations in the population off NSW. But today scientists from both States are launching a new project to investigate whether marine protected areas could successfully protect the creatures.Annie Guest reports from Hobart.
quickly they grow, all of those kinds of basic seahorse biology questions.ANNIE GUEST: And which MPAs will

24 nov
SPECIES-THREATENING SNAILS FOUND IN COLORADO
http://www.enn.com/today.html?id=446
Tough and tiny snails that threaten to crowd out native species by hogging all the food have shown up in a Colorado creek for the first time, state wildlife biologists said Tuesday. New Zealand mudsnails, native to the Southern Hemisphere, were found in Boulder Creek. How they got there is a mystery, since their nearest known location was in northeastern Utah, at least 200 miles away. "They can cause a lot of damage. These snails are highly adaptable and reproduce in such great numbers that they can actually lock up the available nutrients in an ecosystem," said Peter Walker, senior fish pathologist for the state Division of Wildlife.

26 nov
TIGER POPULATION CLOSE TO EXTINCTION
http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?set_id=1&cl...01449520532B251
The world's tiger population has plummeted by 95 percent from the start of the 20th century to as few as 5 000 now and is further threatened by the lucrative trade in their skins, officials told a forum on Friday."Commercial trade of tiger skin stemming out of female fantasy and vanity appears as a major threat to tigers in most tiger range countries," said SC Dey, general secretary of the Global Tiger Forum.In Asia, tiger skins can sell for $15 000 (about R90 000) while in Vietnam a skeleton, the bones widely believed by Asians to be an aphrodisiac, can fetch as much as $25 000 (about R150 000)."It is believed that about 100 years back, the global population of wild tigers was about 100 000," Dey said. "However, the population dwindled to 8 000 by 1960. Today it stands at around 5 000 to 7 000."The forum is an inter-governmental body set up to save the surviving tigers in the wild in 14 countries including Vietnam, Myanmar, India, Russia, Nepal, China, Bangladesh and North Korea.Dey said three out of the eight sub-species of tigers were already extinct - the Bali tiger in 1940, the Caspian tiger in the 1970s and Javan tiger in the 1980s.Another sub-species, the South China tiger, could also soon disappear."Whether tigers still exist in North Korea is doubtful and debatable," he said, noting that statistics were not available.Officials said illegal poaching of wildlife, especially in large parts of south and south-east Asia, is to blame for the reduction in the wild tiger population."Illegal hunting of wildlife has not been strictly controlled resulting in the severely decreased population of tigers in Vietnam," said Vietnam Agriculture Minister Cao Duc Phat.The number of wild tigers in Vietnam does not exceed 150, he said.Vietnam had clinched several agreements with neighbouring countries, including China, Laos and Cambodia, to halt trans-border tiger poaching, he said

27 nov
HUMANE SOCIETY SEEKS NEW MEASURES TO PROTECT ALBATROSS
http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200411/s1252922.htm
A recent decline in the albatross population has sparked calls for long-line fishing to be regulated along the eastern seaboard of Australia.The Humane Society says six birds have recently been killed north of Mooloolaba on Queensland's Sunshine Coast after being caught in the long fishing lines.The society is urging the Australian Fisheries Management Authority to regulate long-line fishing, particularly along the Queensland coast where it says a number of albatross species have been killed.The society's wildlife habitats manager, Nicola Beynon, says most fishermen in southern areas set their lines at night when there are less birds around.But she says more measures are needed to ensure albatross' survival."In the longer term we need to work out a line-weighting regime," she said."That will mean weights will be put on the lines and they'll sink faster out of the reach of the sea birds."

27 nov
LOCUST ALERT IN CANARY ISLANDS
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/4048499.stm
The arrival of swarms of locusts in Spain’s Canary Islands has prompted the authorities to order a state of alert. The regional government said some 5,000 African locusts had been found in Lanzarote and Fuerteventura on Friday. An agriculture ministry spokesman said 1,500 litres of insecticide had been shipped in to exterminate the bugs, which have not reached high levels yet. Officials may begin spraying if the locusts, which have devastated crops in West Africa, start to arrive in force. Hot winds Regional agriculture minister Pedro Rodriguez Zaragoza travelled to Lanzarote, one of the worst affected islands, on Saturday. The invasion is believed to be the worst faced by the islands since the 1950s. He said spraying with the toxic insecticide might be needed if strong, hot winds continue to blow in from Africa, as meteorologists predict. The Canary Islands, a popular tourist destination, lie only about 60 miles (100 km) from the closest African territory, Western Sahara. Locusts can travel twice that far in a day in search of food. Mr Zaragoza insisted the presence of the bugs in the Canary Islands was at present insignificant – and that they would be exterminated before they could cause the kind of damage seen in Africa. He told Spanish newspaper El Pais that the recorded density was still less than 0.2 insects per square metre – compared to 12,000 per square metre in parts of Africa. However, officials fear a recent hot spell may have helped locusts mature.

29 nov
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=stor...ralia_whales_dc
Eighty Whales, Dolphins Die on Australian Island
At least 80 whales and dolphins have died after beaching themselves on a remote island between the Australian mainland and the country's island state of Tasmania.
The number of deaths on King Island could be higher as some bodies might have been washed back out to sea, said Warwick Brennan, a spokesman for Tasmania's Department of Primary Industry, Water and Environment.


30 nov
ARE CHASE LAKE PELICANS ARRIVING IN FLORIDA?
http://www.bismarcktribune.com/articles/20...local/nws04.txt
American white pelicans are settling into their winter hangouts on the Florida Gulf Coast, but what's unclear is how many are part of the huge pelican colony that vanished from North Dakota last spring.Ann Paul, Tampa Bay regional coordinator for Audubon of Florida, had no estimate of how many white pelicans had arrived and didn't expect a number until after the Christmas Bird Count. Typically, 10,000 to 12,000 white pelicans winter in the area.More than 27,000 white pelicans abruptly pulled out of their summer breeding grounds at Chase Lake National Wildlife Refuge last spring, abandoning eggs and some young and leaving biologists to wonder why.
"I wouldn't say they are those birds without seeing the bands," Paul said Monday, "and getting close is difficult."Banding studies have shown that the Tampa area's pelican population comes from North Dakota and Minnesota, Paul said."It wouldn't be out of the realm of possibility," Mick Erickson, the Chase Lake refuge manager, said of Tampa's growing pelican population.Even if the pelicans had summered as usual at Chase Lake NWR, they would have migrated anyway, Erickson added.But the pelicans' return to the Tampa area was of keener interest than usual this fall because of the mysterious disappearance.Paul estimated as many as 400 on one sandbar in late October, with more arrivals almost daily."I was glad to see them," she said.With some white pelicans possibly back in their routines, next comes Erickson's turn to wait."We are anticipating them coming back, and we hope things return to normal," he said. "We're anxiously awaiting spring."


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