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POLITICAL ART GALLERY



IMPORTANT TOPICS

1. U.S. NEWS MEDIA CAN LEGALLY LIE TO YOU
There is no law preventing the U.S. news media from intentionally lying to the public. Whistle blowers and honest reporters are fired for telling the truth.

2. FLUORIDE IS A TOXIN/POISON
Read the Poison Warning label on your toothpaste, then call the 800# and ask;
"Why do you put poison in my toothpaste?"

3. NEW FLU VACCINE IS LOADED WITH MERCURY
by Dr. Joseph Mercola

4. PEDOPHILES IN HIGH PLACES
Also: Conspiracy of Silence Video

5. ASPARTAME IS HARMFUL
Equal, Nutra-Sweet and over 6000 food and beverage products contain Aspartame

6. On September 10, 2001, Donald Rumsfeld held a press conference to disclose that over $2,000,000,000,000 (2 Trillion) in Pentagon funds could not be accounted for.
Such a disclosure normally would have sparked a huge scandal. However, the commencement of the [9/11] attack on the World Trade Center and The Pentagon the following morning would assure that the story remained buried.


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Pages: (9) « First ... 7 8 [9]  ( Go to first unread post ) Reply to this topicStart new topicStart Poll

> MYSTERY OF THE DEAD SCIENTISTS


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Posted: Jan 6 2010, 09:14 PM
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I got a feeling about this one.

QUOTE


Barc investigating if dead scientists were careless

Mihika Basu / Thursday, December 31, 2009 1:20 IST

Mumbai: A day after two young research scientists died in a massive fire at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, the organisation is investigating if there were any lapses or carelessness on their part.

Tuesday’s fire was the second such incident in the past couple of days. “A week ago, there was a small fire five blocks/modules away from Tuesday’s spot,” SK Malhotra, head of the public awareness division, Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), said.

“Umang Singh was involved. So, we are trying to find out if he was always careful or not.” Singh was one of the scientists killed in Tuesday’s fire.

Barc has, however, ruled out sabotage or mischief. “It is most likely an accident at work. There were no security lapses,” he said. “We learn from every incident, good or bad. We see how things could have been better or what could have been avoided. We are always cautious; our safety record is good.”

In 1963, there was a bigger accident while distilling benzene, he said. One person was killed. “There have been small fires, but nothing of this nature. In the late 1980s or start of 1990s, there was an accident involving a crane,” Malhotra said. “Based on the investigations, we will decide if the operative process needs to be modified.”

Barc will decide if the staff needs safety training. Work at the organisation has almost stopped. “It is natural; people have lost two of their colleagues,” Malhotra said.


http://www.dnaindia.com/mumbai/report_barc...areless_1329276

This post has been edited by DarmonVing on Jan 6 2010, 09:15 PM


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Posted: Jan 6 2010, 09:20 PM
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This one needs to be checked out. Environmental Scientists.

QUOTE


3 dead, another missing after state copter crashes in Sierra foothills

[Updated] January 5, 2010 |  3:53 pm

At least three people are dead and a fourth is missing after a state Department of Fish and Game helicopter crashed in rugged terrain in the Sierra National Forest in Madera County, fire officials said.

[Updated 4:51 p.m.: Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger issued a statement on the crash saying that all four people aboard are now presumed dead.

"This is a devastating tragedy, and Maria and I join all Californians in expressing our shock and sadness. Tonight, we send our thoughts and prayers to the families and friends of the victims. Our hearts are with them during this difficult time," Schwarzenegger wrote.

The crew was performing a routine aerial survey of deer populations when the crash occurred.  An investigation is underway and no cause for the crash has been determined. The Fish and Game Department has grounded all helicopter surveys and captures until further notice.]

The Bell 206 copter may have struck a power line while doing surveying work near Willow Creek on the west side of Lake Reddinger, according to preliminary information from the Federal Aviation Administration.

Rescue crews were dispatched at 12:17 p.m. and had to drive and then hike to the crash site, said Karen Guillemin, spokeswoman for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

"Access was difficult," she said.

Guillemin said crews were searching for the fourth person.

At least two of those killed were environmental scientists, according to the California Assn. of Professional Scientists.

"Our deepest sympathy and condolences go to the family, friends and colleagues of all who lost their lives in this awful tragedy," association president Patty Velez said in a statement.

Guillemin said the department had contracted the helicopter from a private firm.

The registered owner of the aircraft is Palm Springs Aviation Inc., according to FAA records.

Federal investigators were dispatched to the crash site. No other details were available.

-- Robert J. Lopez


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Posted: Jan 7 2010, 05:11 PM
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I'm not sure if anyone saw this one.


QUOTE
DoH epidemiologist shot dead in Davao City


By Dennis Jay Santos
Inquirer Mindanao
First Posted 10:26:00 06/25/2009

Filed Under: Crime


DAVAO CITY -- Unidentified gunmen shot dead the chief epidemiologist of the Department of Health in Southern Mindanao on Wednesday evening, the police said Thursday.

Dr. Rogelio Peñera was driving his Honda Civic sedan and was about to enter the Countryville village compound in Cabantian in Buhangin district here where he lived, when attacked around 6:45 p.m. His 15-year-old daughter Leany, who was with him, was hit in the arm.

The father and daughter were rushed to the Davao Medical Center, but the elder Peñera died on the way.

Superintendent Antonio Rivera, public information officer of the Davao City Police Office, told the Philippine Daily Inquirer that they were considering two possible angles behind the killing.

“One is mistaken identity as his car is similar to the one owned by a neighbor," he said.

Rivera said another angle they were looking at was personal grudge.

“I know him as a co-health worker. He is an efficient worker and compassionate. I am at a loss on what happened. It was totally senseless,” Dr. Leopoldo Vega, chief of hospital of the DMC, said.

Assistant Health Secretary Paulyn Jean Ubial said Peñera's death was so sudden.

The slain health official was at the center of a campaign involving communicable diseases, including Influenza A (H1N1) in Southern Mindanao.


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Posted: Jan 7 2010, 05:25 PM
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One more for the road...


QUOTE
Innocent pleas over scientist's death
Published: Jan. 7, 2010 at 1:39 PM

HEBRON, Ky., Jan. 7 (UPI) -- A woman and her son have pleaded innocent to charges they abducted schizophrenic scientist Walter Sartory in Kentucky and later killed the man.

The Los Angeles Times said Thursday that Sartory's housekeeper, Willa Blanc, and her son, Louis Wilkinson, are being held in lieu of $10 million bail on charges ranging from murder to kidnapping.

The mother-son pair being held in Boone County, Ky., is accused of abducting and drugging Sartory, 73, in an attempt to get access to his financial accounts.

Authorities said while being held prisoner, Sartory was not provided with the medication to control his panic attacks and the former scientist at Tennessee's Oak Ridge National Laboratory died.

Blanc and Wilkinson allegedly burned Sartory's body after the death of the scientist, who was reported missing last February.

Wilkinson allegedly told authorities he found Sartory being held prisoner in their home in mid-February, adding the scientist appeared drugged.

Wilkinson said Sartory had breathing problems and repeatedly vomited due to being denied his medication, the Times reported.


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Posted: Jan 8 2010, 07:19 AM
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Here's an update on the helicopter crash. Looks like it was an unmarked powerline that was responsible for it...

QUOTE
Investigators probe copter crash in the Sierra Nevadas

By Kevin Smith, Staff Writer
Posted: 01/07/2010 11:13:58 PM PST


A federal investigation is under way to determine the cause of a helicopter crash in the Sierra Nevadas that occurred Wednesday when the craft hit an unmarked Southern California Edison power line.

Three state scientists and the pilot of the Bell 206 helicopter were killed when the copter clipped a skyline grounding wire between two Edison transmission towers, igniting a fire that consumed the craft and sent debris flying.

The team had been conducting a deer survey in a craggy stretch of the mountain range where electric lines crisscross the canyons.

Edison spokesman Steve Conroy acknowledged the line wasn't marked but said the utility was never asked to do so - by the FAA or any other agency.

"Those lines have been sitting up there since the 1950s when they were installed," he said. "We've never been approached by any external parties, private or governmental, to install markers on the lines."

Conroy said Edison transmission lines in the Antelope Valley and some other regions are marked, likely as result of construction guidelines in those areas.

"At the end of the day, we're trying not to lose sight of these four people who lost their lives as a result of this," he said. "It's important for us to see the outcome of the investigation so we can determine what steps we need to take to avoid having this happen in the future."

The investigation will likely consider such factors as line visibility, aircraft speed,
a possible mechanical malfunction and pilot error.
"The FAA does not require that power lines be marked because we do not have authority over local developments/projects," FAA spokesman Ian Gregor said in a statement. "However, we recommend that all power lines be marked to make them as visible as possible to pilots."

And it would be the responsibility of the power line owner/operator to do that, he said.

The FAA offers the following recommendations"

Markers should be placed on transmission wires and support structures to minimize the chance that pilots could inadvertently fly into them

Markers on long wires across canyons, lakes and rivers should be at least three feet in diameter

Markers should be a bright color that's easy to see, such as orange, white or yellow, as well as an alternating color scheme

Markers should be spaced about 200 feet apart in equal intervals (When lines are low to the ground or near an airport a closer spacing is recommended)

National Transportation Safety Board investigators will spend the next two weeks examining the wreckage and radar and air traffic control data, as well as interviewing eye witnesses before issuing a preliminary finding about the probable cause.

If it's determined that SCE - a division of Edison International - shirked its duty to mark the power line, it could be held partially legally responsible for the crash, experts said.


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Posted: Feb 15 2010, 08:46 PM
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This is a very interesting case and one that would make me tend to think that there might be some sort of mind control component involved with it as well as the Annie Le case.

QUOTE
Twists Multiply in Alabama Shooting Case

By SHAILA DEWAN and KATIE ZEZIMA
Published: February 14, 2010

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — On Friday, this city of rocket scientists and brainy inventors was stunned when a neuroscientist with a Harvard Ph.D. was arrested in the shooting deaths of three of her colleagues after she was denied tenure.

The Braintree, Mass., home where Ms. Bishop shot and killed her brother in 1986. Police investigators declared it an accident.

But that was only the first surprise in the tale of the neuroscientist, Amy Bishop, who was regarded as fiercely intelligent and had seemed to have a promising career in biotechnology. Every day since has produced a new revelation from Dr. Bishop’s past, each more bizarre than the last.

On Saturday, the police in Braintree, Mass., said that she had fatally shot her brother in 1986 and questioned whether the decision to dismiss the case as an accident had been the right one.

On Sunday, a law enforcement official in Boston said she and her husband, James Anderson, had been questioned in a 1993 case in which a pipe bomb was sent to a colleague of Dr. Bishop’s at Children’s Hospital Boston.

The bomb did not go off, no one was ever charged in the case, and no proof ever emerged connecting the couple to the bomb plot.

On Sunday, Mr. Anderson firmly defended his wife in an interview at their home in Huntsville, saying that she had been completely cleared in the pipe bomb case and that her brother’s death had been accidental.

“That’s incorrect,” he said about reports linking him and his wife to the bomb plot. “We were not suspects. They questioned everybody that ever knew this guy.”

The target of the mail bomb was Dr. Paul Rosenberg, according to The Boston Globe, which first reported that the couple had been questioned in the case. After returning home from a vacation, Dr. Rosenberg opened a package that contained two 6-inch pipe bombs connected to two nine-volt batteries, The Globe reported. The doctor and his wife fled and called the police.

Officials said that Dr. Bishop was concerned that Dr. Rosenberg would give her a negative evaluation on her doctorate work, the newspaper wrote, and that they were concerned about the incident involving her brother. The authorities in Boston searched Dr. Bishop’s computer at the time and found a novel she was working on about a scientist who killed her brother and atoned by excelling at her work, The Globe reported.

Though he firmly protested his wife’s innocence in the earlier cases, Mr. Anderson said he remained mystified over Friday’s shootings, which left three professors dead and three other people wounded after a faculty meeting at the University of Alabama, Huntsville.

Dr. Bishop was charged with capital murder; three charges of attempted murder were added on Sunday. Mr. Anderson said he did not know of any specific incident that could have led to the shooting, and did not know that his wife allegedly had a gun when she went to the meeting.

“I had no idea,” he said. “We don’t own one.”

Those killed were Gopi Podila, 52, the chairman of the biology department; Maria Ragland Davis, 50, a professor who studied plant pathogens; and Adriel Johnson, 52, a cell biologist who also taught Boy Scouts about science.

Two of the wounded were Joseph Leahy, 50, a microbiologist, and Stephanie Monticciolo, 62, a staff assistant, both of whom were in critical condition. The third was Luis Cruz-Vera, 40, a molecular biologist, who was released from the hospital on Saturday.

Mr. Anderson said that months ago, the university administration overruled a successful appeal of the decision to deny Dr. Bishop tenure in spring 2009.

“She won her appeal,” he said, “and the provost canned it.”

The university has declined to elaborate on the details of Dr. Bishop’s tenure application, saying only that she was denied last spring and that she could stay at the university only until the end of this academic year. Even if a faculty member successfully appeals a tenure denial, the final decision rests with the administration.

But Dr. Bishop had continued to fight, appealing to two members of the University of Alabama System’s Board of Trustees for help and hiring a lawyer, who was “finding one problem after another with the process,” Mr. Anderson said. One issue was a dispute over whether two of her papers had been published in time to count toward tenure, he said.

“She exceeded the qualifications for tenure,” Mr. Anderson said. “The review board said, ‘Grant it or go through the process again.’ ”

Mr. Anderson said that his wife’s research was generating millions of dollars for the university, that she had published numerous papers and that she was a good teacher.

But that estimate of her financial benefit to the university seems likely to be premature. One of her innovations, an automated system for producing cell cultures that the couple developed together, has attracted $1.25 million in financing but has not yet reached the market. Another, a potential treatment for degenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, is in the process of being licensed from the university. Typically, universities share the proceeds from such licenses with the scientists responsible.

The police said Saturday that Dr. Bishop was 45, but her birth date on a university Web site indicated that she was 44.

Mr. Anderson said he could not gain access to his wife’s e-mail account and did not know if she had received any news that might have set off the shooting. The police, he said, had taken a thick binder documenting her tenure battle, her computer and the family van. At least one of the trustees had recently told her that he could not help reverse the tenure decision, a family friend said.

Mr. Anderson said he had already told the Huntsville police that they might come across the Boston pipe bomb incident during their investigation.

Sylvia Fluckiger, who worked as a laboratory technician at Children’s Hospital when Dr. Bishop and Dr. Rosenberg were working there, said Dr. Bishop had acknowledged that she was questioned by the police about the pipe bomb incident.

“She was visited by the police,” Ms. Fluckiger said. “What she said is they asked her if she had ever used a stamp, taken it off an envelope and put it somewhere else.”

Ms. Fluckiger said Dr. Bishop “had a smirk on her face” when asked about the incident. “I don’t know why she was smirking,” she said. “It was a funny expression on her face.”

“We did know that there was a dispute between Paul Rosenberg and her,” Ms. Fluckiger said, adding that she could not recall the details.

On Saturday, the police in Braintree said they were considering reopening the case of the shooting death of her brother, Seth Bishop, 18. Although a state police report said investigators determined that the shooting was an accident, Police Chief Paul Frazier said other officers remember that it came after an argument and questioned why local police documents could not be found.

On Sunday, Mayor Joseph C. Sullivan of Braintree, a Boston suburb, issued a statement saying the town would conduct a “full and thorough review” of its records for any material relating to Seth Bishop’s death. But he noted that records from 1986 were created and maintained manually, which would complicate their retrieval.

Standing at his door after church on Sunday, Mr. Anderson confirmed the existence of the novel reported in The Globe, as well as two others his wife worked on in her spare time. The couple has four children, ranging from grade-school to college age. Mr. Anderson said that somewhere in his files he had a letter sent by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms after the bomb investigation, saying: “You are hereby cleared in this incident. You are no longer a subject of the investigation.”

“This is one thing from the past I hoped would not be dredged up,” he said.


Shaila Dewan reported from Huntsville, and Katie Zezima from Boston.


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Posted: Feb 16 2010, 11:10 AM
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Climber dies after mountain fall
A scientist from Edinburgh has been killed while climbing on Ben Lui, near Tyndrum, it has emerged.

Dr Timothy Garn, 27, a researcher in extragalactic astrophysics at the Royal Observatory of Edinburgh, fell more than 300ft near the summit.

Weather conditions at the time of the accident on Sunday were described as "atrocious".

Dr Garn's girlfriend and climbing partner managed to alert the emergency services by mobile phone.

Police received the initial call-out at 1600 GMT on Sunday, but details of the incident were not released until Friday.

Killin Mountain Rescue Team rescued Dr Garn's partner from the summit, and found Dr Garn lying in a corrie.

He had head injuries, and was thought to have also suffered hypothermia.

“ He was a very talented young astrophysicist whose research career was blossoming quickly, and whose future was extremely bright ”
Royal Observatory statement
Despite efforts to save his life, Dr Garn was later pronounced dead at Stirling Royal Infirmary.

Ch Insp Kevin Findlater of Central Scotland Police, who co-ordinated the rescue, described it as "a very tough incident" in which members of the MRT had to operate in "terrible weather conditions".

Dr Garn, who lived in Edinburgh, was brought up in Surrey.

He had joined Edinburgh University's Institute for Astronomy just over a year ago.

In a statement, the Royal Observatory said: "He was a very talented young astrophysicist whose research career was blossoming quickly, and whose future was extremely bright.

"An enthusiastic and very likeable young man, he lived life to the full and enriched the lives of those around him. He will be sorely missed, as a colleague and a friend."


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Posted: Feb 16 2010, 11:17 AM
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QUOTE
Andrew Lange, Scholar of the Cosmos, Dies at 52

By DENNIS OVERBYE
Published: January 27, 2010

Andrew Lange, an astrophysicist whose balloon-borne measurements of light left over from the Big Bang played a key role in elucidating the shape and nature of the universe, was found dead on Jan. 22 in Los Angeles. He was 52.

His death was announced by Jean-Lou Chameau, the president of the California Institute of Technology, where Dr. Lange had until recently been chairman of the division of physics, mathematics and astronomy. President Chameau said Dr. Lange appeared to have taken his own life.

Dr. Lange devoted his career to a haze of faint microwaves that pervade the sky, providing a whispery ghost image of the universe when it was only 400,000 years old, before there were stars, galaxies or even atoms.

In the late 1990s, this work put him in the middle of one of the grandest quests in science, the effort to discern the fate of the universe — whether it would keep expanding forever or collapse one day into the fire from which it had emerged 14 billion years ago. According to Einstein, that fate was determined by the large-scale geometry of space time, which in turn is determined by the amount of matter and energy in the universe.


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Posted: Oct 10 2010, 07:31 PM
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I just added this one to the list...



QUOTE
UAB Physiology and Biophysics Chair Dale Benos dead at age 60

October 8, 2010

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - Dale Benos, Ph.D., noted scientist and chairman of the University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Physiology and Biophysics, died suddenly of natural causes Oct. 7, 2010. He was 60.

Benos joined UAB in 1985 as associate professor of Physiology and Biophysics; he was named professor in 1987 and appointed chair of the department in 1996. He also held professorships in Cell Biology and Neurobiology and was a senior scientist with UAB's Gregory Fleming James Cystic Fibrosis Research Center, the Nephrology Research and Training Center, UAB Center for AIDS Research, UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Center, Center for Computational and Structural Biology, Center for Biophysical Sciences and Engineering and Vision Science Research Center.

"Dale Benos was a phenomenal scientist, educator and person," said Ray Watts, M.D., senior vice president for medicine at UAB and dean of the School of Medicine. "Dale's leadership both at UAB and internationally, as well as his contributions to the body of scientific knowledge and to the training of future scientists, garnered the utmost respect from his friends and colleagues. He will be greatly missed."

UAB President Carol Garrison said the institution and the scientific community have lost a great friend and colleague.

"Dale was a dedicated mentor and scientist who made a great impact on all of the lives he touched," Garrison said. "Our thoughts and sympathies are with his family, friends and colleagues. He was the embodiment of excellence in research and education."

Benos was internationally recognized for his contributions to the field of physiology and biophysics and he received many accolades, at UAB and beyond. In 2006 he received the UAB President's Award for Excellence in Teaching. In 2008, he was named UAB's first holder of the University of Alabama Health Services Foundation Endowed Chair in Biomedical Research.

From 2006 to 2007 he served as president of The American Physiological Society.

In 2007 Benos received the School of Medicine's highest faculty honor, the Distinguished Faculty Lecturer. It was a reflection of his contributions to the university and the community.

Benos is survived by his wife Kim, and daughters Kaitie and Emilee. A memorial service for Benos will be held Sunday, October 10, 2010 at 3:00 p.m. at the Church of the Highlands, 4700 Highlands Way, Birmingham, AL 35210. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to the Dale Benos Research Fund, c/o UAB Gift Records, 1530 3rd Ave. S., AB1230, Birmingham, Ala., 35294.

A distinguished history

Continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health since 1976 and principal investigator for 19 individual research grants, Benos' research focused on understanding the movement of sodium ions present in the membranes of surface and nerve cells. That process is relative to the progression of certain diseases such as cystic fibrosis and hypertension. His laboratory also investigated the role of ion channels and transporters in human brain tumors. During his career, he trained more than 15 graduate students and 34 postdoctoral fellows.

In addition to his teaching and research efforts, Benos served as a visiting professor, distinguished lecturer, or invited speaker at more than 100 major national and international universities or symposia, chairing seven Experimental Biology symposia. Benos was a member of eight NIH special study sections, an ad hoc reviewer for seven NIH/CF study sections and chaired multiple site visits and special emphasis panels. He was a member of or chaired more than 50 major committees at UAB and several at Harvard University; among those were the UAB Medical Education Committee (serving in several capacities, including chair), Minority Medical Education Program, Alabama State Education Task Force and UAB Research Foundation Funding Flow Task Force.

Benos authored more than 200 original articles and 80 invited reviews and edited four books. He edited and served on editorial board of several national journals; he was editor-in-chief of the American Journal of Physiology: Cell Physiology and served on its editorial board, and he was editor of APS's "Physiology in Medicine" series that is published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

Benos also was on the editorial board of the journal SHOCK, was a section editor for Biochemica et Biophysica Acta (Biomembranes); a series editor for "Current Topics in Membranes"; and an associate editor for Journal of Biological Chemistry. He has served as editorial board member for Journal of American Society of Nephrology, Placenta, Biological Research, Current Cardiology Reviews, Journal of Biological Chemistry. He was also associate editor for Comments on Molecular and Cellular Biophysics.

Benos, who served on the American Physiology Society's Council before becoming president, also was active in other professional societies, including the Council of Science Editors, Society of General Physiologists, American Society for Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, American Society of Nephrology, Association of Chairs of Departments of Physiology, Society of Neuroscience, New York Academy of Sciences, Biophysical Society and American Society of Cell Biology.

Benos earned his bachelor's degree in biology in 1972 from Case Western Reserve University. He earned his Ph.D. in physiology and pharmacology from Duke University in 1976 and also completed a post-doctoral fellowship in physiology at Duke in 1978. After completing his fellowship, he was an Andrew W. Mellon Scholar in the Laboratory of Human Reproduction and Reproductive Biology at Harvard Medical School, where he was both assistant and associate professor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics before joining the UAB faculty in 1985.


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Posted: Oct 10 2010, 07:38 PM
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Another one... blinkNEW.gif

QUOTE
Former N.L. Doctor Found Dead
By KGNS News

Story Created: Oct 8, 2010

(Story Updated: Oct 8, 2010 )

The former health director for Nuevo Laredo was found dead inside his Laredo home. According to the Laredo Police Department they responded to a person dead in the 1000 block of Eden lane. Police are not releasing too much information but said the victim is 55-year-old Luis Eduardo Campbell. Police say he was found shot on the floor. Dr. Campbell was still working for Nuevo Laredo under Ramón Garza barrios but for a brief time he was the director of the Nuevo Laredo health department.

"They found several pieces of evidence in the location. At this particular time, officially to make a ruling is to premature."

The Laredo Police Department is waiting for autopsy results and they are currently conducting a death investigation.


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Posted: Oct 11 2010, 06:25 AM
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This might be another one...

QUOTE
UofM Researcher Killed In Hit-And-Run Crash

Posted Wednesday September 22, 2010 2 weeks, 5 days ago

(Minneapolis, MN)  --  A research scientist from the University of Minnesota was killed in an early morning hit-and-run crash Tuesday morning in Minneapolis.  Thirty-seven-year-old Ethan Johnson died after the car he was in was hit by a driver who ran a stop sign and then fled the scene.  Johnson's wife and parents were in the car with him just a block from home when the crash occurred.  According to police, the driver was later arrested and is being held on criminal vehicular homicide charges.  Johnson and his family had just returned from a vacation in the Boundary Waters.  He would have celebrated his 38th birthday today.


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Posted: Oct 11 2010, 06:29 AM
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Hit-and-run turns fatal

U research associate Ethan Johnson was killed in a car accident at the age of 37.

2010 / 09 / 23

By Jennifer Bissell

Ethan Johnson, a research associate in the Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics, died early Tuesday. He was 37.

Johnson died after the car he was in was struck in a hit-and-run in south Minneapolis at the intersection of 18th Avenue South and 35th Street East, according to police.

The driver of the other car — who was arrested Tuesday — failed to stop at a stop sign and ran from the scene on foot, according to police.

Johnson’s parents and wife, who were also in the car, were transported to Hennepin County Medical Center for treatment after the accident.

Johnson’s 65-year-old father, Stephen Johnson, was still hospitalized in satisfactory condition as of Wednesday evening, according to HCMC. Johnson’s wife and mother sustained minor injuries.

Johnson had worked on various projects in Professor Claudia Schmidt-Dannert’s laboratory at the University of Minnesota since 2005.

“He’s definitely going to be missed around here. He’s already missed,” co-worker Jacob Vick said. “He was a very integral part of the lab environment. He was one of the main reasons you liked working in Claudia’s lab.”

Johnson’s work has been published in several science journals, including in American Chemistry Society and American Society for Microbiology publications.

Outside of the lab, Johnson was busy in the arts community or enjoying the outdoors, Vick said. He played the cornet in the 11-piece band Brass Messengers and helped plan the Mayday parades with his wife, Xena Huff.

Johnson was also a puppeteer for BareBones arts community, said BareBones artist Brent Harring.

He was a hippie in the best way possible, Vick said. Johnson grew his own food, liked canoeing and rode his bike every day, even in the middle of winter.

“[He was a] very kind, generous person,” Schmidt-Dannert said. “He was actually the one that everyone went to if they needed help.

“He had a fantastic sense of humor … It will take a couple weeks until things finally start quieting down and getting back.”

Friends of Johnson had a memorial bike ride on Lake Street to the site of the accident Wednesday night.


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