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> Honey Bee Mystery, Millions of bee's missing


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Posted: Mar 6 2007, 12:38 PM
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Posted: Mar 6 2007, 01:45 PM
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Manna, Please post the article (or at least a portion of it) or this thread may be deleted.

I do not trust most links and internet sites so I cannot read the article.

(Note: even .jpg images can contain malicious codes imbedded in them)





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Posted: Mar 6 2007, 06:56 PM
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Sorry Mark~~~ I am rather new at posting and don't quite have the hang of it.
The article as below (I hope). There was a map also but I can't figure out how to post that.

http://aginfo.psu.edu/news/07Jan/HoneyBees.htm


January 29 , 2007
HONEY BEE DIE-OFF ALARMS BEEKEEPERS, CROP GROWERS AND RESEARCHERS
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- An alarming die-off of honey bees has beekeepers fighting for commercial survival and crop growers wondering whether bees will be available to pollinate their crops this spring and summer.

Researchers are scrambling to find answers to what's causing an affliction recently named Colony Collapse Disorder, which has decimated commercial beekeeping operations in Pennsylvania and across the country.

"During the last three months of 2006, we began to receive reports from commercial beekeepers of an alarming number of honey bee colonies dying in the eastern United States," says Maryann Frazier, apiculture extension associate in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences. "Since the beginning of the year, beekeepers from all over the country have been reporting unprecedented losses.
"This has become a highly significant yet poorly understood problem that threatens the pollination industry and the production of commercial honey in the United States," she says. "Because the number of managed honey bee colonies is less than half of what it was 25 years ago, states such as Pennsylvania can ill afford these heavy losses."

A working group of university faculty researchers, state regulatory officials, cooperative extension educators and industry representatives is working to identify the cause or causes of Colony Collapse Disorder and to develop management strategies and recommendations for beekeepers. Participating organizations include Penn State, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the agriculture departments in Pennsylvania and Florida, and Bee Alert Technology Inc., a technology transfer company affiliated with the University of Montana.
"Preliminary work has identified several likely factors that could be causing or contributing to CCD," says Dennis vanEngelsdorp, acting state apiarist with the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture. "Among them are mites and associated diseases, some unknown pathogenic disease and pesticide contamination or poisoning."

Initial studies of dying colonies revealed a large number of disease organisms present, with no one disease being identified as the culprit, vanEngelsdorp explains. Ongoing case studies and surveys of beekeepers experiencing CCD have found a few common management factors, but no common environmental agents or chemicals have been identified.

The beekeeping industry has been quick to respond to the crisis. The National Honey Board has pledged $13,000 of emergency funding to the CCD working group. Other organizations, such as the Florida State Beekeepers Association, are working with their membership to commit additional funds.

This latest loss of colonies could seriously affect the production of several important crops that rely on pollination services provided by commercial beekeepers.

"For instance, the state's $45 million apple crop -- the fourth largest in the country -- is completely dependent on insects for pollination, and 90 percent of that pollination comes from honey bees," Frazier says. "So the value of honey bee pollination to apples is about $40 million."
In total, honey bee pollination contributes about $55 million to the value of crops in the state. Besides apples, crops that depend at least in part on honey bee pollination include peaches, soybeans, pears, pumpkins, cucumbers, cherries, raspberries, blackberries and strawberries.

Frazier says to cope with a potential shortage of pollination services, growers should plan well ahead. "If growers have an existing contract or relationship with a beekeeper, they should contact that beekeeper as soon as possible to ascertain if the colonies they are counting on will be available," she advises. "If growers do not have an existing arrangement with a beekeeper but are counting on the availability of honey bees in spring, they should not delay but make contact with a beekeeper and arrange for pollination services now.

"However, beekeepers overwintering in the north many not know the status of their colonies until they are able to make early spring inspections," she adds. "This should occur in late February or early March but is dependent on weather conditions. Regardless, there is little doubt that honey bees are going to be in short supply this spring and possibly into the summer."
A detailed, up-to-date report on Colony Collapse Disorder can be found on the Mid-Atlantic Apiculture Research and Extension Consortium Web site at http://maarec.org.


Contact Maryann Frazier at (814) 865-4621 or by e-mail at mxt15@psu.edu. Dennis vanEngelsdorp can be reached at (717) 772-5225 or by e-mail at c-dvanengl@state.pa.us.





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Posted: Mar 6 2007, 08:06 PM
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Thank you Manna!
face.gif

QUOTE
Researchers are scrambling to find answers to what's causing an affliction recently named Colony Collapse Disorder, which has decimated commercial beekeeping operations in Pennsylvania and across the country.

That's sure comforting to know!




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Posted: Mar 7 2007, 04:30 PM
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Hiya Mark ..

My ex husband was a beekeeper ( Apiculturist ) ..
A few things about wunnerful lil critters which may be of interest ..

Bees are entrained to the magnetic grid of the planet ..
maybe the current fluctuations in the magnetic grid are confusing them
as to the societal order of the hive .. ( just a thought )

Bees are also a kind of environmental barometer .. eg
Pesticides and fungi really play havoc with them ..

There is also a tradition in old wiccan lore that bees are capable of SENDING
which means .. that if you are a SENSITIVE .. they carry messages ..
the old aying goes .. ''I heard it from the bees" ..

There is also a rich tradition of arcane symbolism in the meaning of Bees and hives
esp the depiction of the old fashioned conical style beehives ..

The story in the above post reminds me of the mystery of the disappearing frogs,and LadyBugs ..

It bodes badly fer the future .. methinks ... sigh

Peace Out ..
Nodstar*MARVINBlinkNewEmot3.gif

EDIT ..

Just found this a moment ago .. and thought I'd add it for interest .,
Seems my comments about the bees and the magnetic grid are confirmed
by this segment from an article about crop circles ..hmmmmm shock.gif

Researchers reported the "Alien Face with a Message" crop circle formation in England 2002, imparted this message [Deciphered through binary code: http://www.cropcircleresearch.com/articles/alienface.html ]:

"Beware the bearers of false gifts & their broken promises. Much pain but still time. (Damaged Word). There is good out there. We Oppose deception. Conduit closing (bell sound)"
.
According to Coco, the message refers to the subsequent broken promises of high ranking officials or the bloodlines after the Tsunami of 2004, as well as the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. "The ultimate deceit is revealed through the oddities of recent yearly catastrophic events, which prove these 'natural' disasters were actually manmade."

Other crop circle messages include the "Bee" formation that signals "the mysterious colony collapse of bees" caused by the breakdown of the Earth's magnetic field. Coco explains, "An innate sensitivity of magnetism is required for bees to navigate, and without that force they are unable to return to the hive. Just as the dolphins who beach themselves, their navigation systems are similarly destroyed because they too cannot find their way home.

These creatures are dying because of high tech weaponry being used to manipulate the energy grid (e.g., sonar, frequency and harmonics), which in turn destroys the Earth's magnetic field."


(For more, see the company websites: http://www.cocotralla.net, http://www.energygrid.biz, http://www.sevenbooks.com and http://www.mayanprophecy.net )



This post has been edited by Nodstar on Mar 7 2007, 04:49 PM




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Posted: Mar 7 2007, 08:38 PM
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Noddy, Thanks for sharing your wunnerful insights!
Magnetic fields.... yes I believe that is factor for many species on Earth.... bees, insects, dolphins, whales etc.

Here's that crop circle image that the message was deciphered from.
(The message is true in my opinion... I am not sure if the crop circle was man-made or not though.)

QUOTE
user posted image
"Beware the bearers of false gifts & their broken promises. Much pain but still time. (Damaged Word). There is good out there. We Oppose deception. Conduit closing (bell sound)"




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Posted: Mar 8 2007, 03:17 PM
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Hey Mark ..

Heres a really good pic of the Honey Bee crop circular ..
(Thanks to Gan for loading it )

user posted image

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This post has been edited by Nodstar on Mar 8 2007, 03:22 PM




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  Posted: Mar 20 2007, 05:06 PM
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Bees are a vital link in the chain of life.

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Received in email...

QUOTE
"How much of our food production do we want to turn over to other countries that might be friendly now and not friendly in the future? The federal government is looking at this and my question is: Are honey bees the canary in the coal mine? What are honey bees trying to tell us that we humans should be paying more attention to?"
- Jerry Hayes, Chief, Apiary Section, Florida Dept. of Agriculture, Gainsville, Florida


February 2007 map showing U.S. states so far affected by the honey bee collapse disorder in which beekeepers have reported 60% to 100% honey bee disappearances without explanation to date. Map courtesy MAAREC.
user posted image

QUOTE
Local buzz on bee disorder
By MARCUS WILKINS
The Fulton Sun
QUOTE
As the fumes billow out of his smoker, local bee keeper Tim Osburn removes the lid from one of his hives to reveal a cluster of movement. A jolt of crisp, early-evening air rushes over his precious bees, slowing them to a lethargic churn.

Luckily for Osburn and many bee keepers across the state, his hives have not yet been stricken with “Colony Collapse Disorder.” CCD is a mysterious affliction that has been affecting bee hives in as many as 24 states and parts of Canada. It is mysterious because, unlike past epidemics of parasitic tracheal and Varroa mites, the disorder leaves no trace of dead bees. This makes it extremely difficult for scientists to investigate the basis of the phenomenon.

It's the honey bee's close link to farming that has many in the agriculture business concerned, even if the insects didn't produce honey. A widespread decline of migratory bees could spell a significant nationwide or even global price increase in certain produce.

Migratory bee keepers “rent out” bee colonies to farmers to increase crop pollination and, therefore, production. Whatever the cause is, CCD seems to spread when the bees are moved to different regions.

“I'm a hobby bee keeper and I started hearing about it a few weeks ago on the news,” said Osburn. “My bees are still there. I've had Verroa before and I've had some weak hives that have been infected with moths, so I treat my hives.”

Hives affected by CCD are typically found containing no adult bees, a bizarre surprise to bee keepers when they check on them after the winter. Other strange occurrences can point to CCD as well, such as the queen uncharacteristically appearing outside the hive or the presence of capped-brood, honeycomb chambers where bees seal off the pupa.

Some scientists suspect the increased use of pesticides and fungicides to be the culprit. Others suggest that it could be another form of mite or pathogen, and still others believe the disorder could be caused by an immunosuppressive problem, similar to HIV in humans.

Missouri State Entomologist Mike Brown, like all other experts nationwide, is at a loss.

“I've not heard of any widespread reports (in Missouri),” said Brown. “I really don't think anyone has a good understanding of what's causing it anywhere. I've heard some theories. I don't know if it's avoiding Missouri or not, but I've heard reports that migratory bee keepers seem to be affected by it.”

Local honey producers Jim and Valerie Dever, owners of JimNI Farms, have monitored their investment closely.

“From what I've read and heard from other bee keepers, we're not going to be affected because we don't use our bees to migrate across the country to pollinate,” said Valerie Dever. “That was the common denominator they've found on both coasts. For almond farming it's required. For other farming - pumpkin farming for instance - it's not required, but it sure does help.”

Bee keepers in Callaway County are breathing a sigh of relief - for now. As the season shifts and apiarists begin checking their hives, things could change.

“There are some migratory bee keepers in Missouri and I've not heard any extensive reports of them having this experience,” said Brown. “It's also possible that the weather is just now starting to warm up and more reports could come in.”

http://www.fultonsun.com/articles/2007/03/...s/298news01.txt



QUOTE
Honey Bee Disappearances Continue: Could Pesticides Play A Role?
Pesticides, sprayed and genetically engineered - Are they linked to honey bee disappearances and decline of all pollinators in North America? 
http://earthfiles.com/news/news.cfm?ID=122...ory=Environment




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"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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  Posted: Mar 25 2007, 09:10 PM
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received in email...

QUOTE
Einstein once said "If the bee disappeared off the surface of the globe then man would only have four years of life left.  No more bees, no more pollination, no more plants, no more animals, no more man."
user posted image


QUOTE
Are GM Crops Killing Bees?

A mysterious decimation of bee populations has German beekeepers worried, while a similar phenomenon in the United States is gradually assuming catastrophic proportions. The consequences for agriculture and the economy could be enormous...

http://www.spiegel.de/international/spiege...,473166,00.html
http://www.rapidcityjournal.com/articles/2.../top/news04.txt
http://www.newstarget.com/021724.html
http://www.fultonsun.com/articles/2007/03/...s/298news01.txt




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"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Mar 27 2007, 02:32 PM
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And now the fish as well

Million Fish Die In Colorado River At Once
http://www.rense.com/general75/mill.htm

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Posted: Apr 19 2007, 08:44 PM
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There's been a decrease in the populations of most species of bees over the last few years... As to one of the possible causes, I heard a while ago that the UV spectrum was changing and either causing the bees to go blind or that the increase of UV rays altered the colors of the flowers so that the bees could no longer recognize them... As you might already know... bees use the reflection of UV off of flower petals to guide their pollen collecting and if there was a significant change in the amount or color of the light reflecting off the petals then the bees would no longer be able to identify them... It is possible that an increase of UVB radiation reaching the surface could be causing something similar to photokeratitis or what we call snow blindness...


Well anyway... Here's an update on te situation...


QUOTE
Thursday, April 19, 2007

Crop pollination threatened in some areas, which could lead to crop failures
By Matt Bewley (Contact) | The Daily Journal

Published Thursday, April 19, 2007

In the last six months, more than 35 percent of the U.S. population of the Western honey bee, required for food crop pollination across the country, have disappeared, leaving their hives to die and crops to fail.

“Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) has hit especially hard on the East Coast,” Mark Sundberg of Sundberg Apiaries in Fergus Falls said. “There are a lot of different theories, but I know they’ve had extremely dry conditions, and when that happens, the queen stops laying (eggs) earlier than normal, so there were no replacements for older bees as they die off.”

To date, scientists have only identified the symptoms of CCD


The cause of the phenomenon remains a mystery, though some say it is no more than a spike in the number of hive deaths, a common occurrence over the past 30 years.

Sundberg reported a 65-percent loss of his hives slated to go to California to pollinate almond crops there. The bees are responsible for 100 percent of the crop pollination so without the bees there simply will be no crop.

Still, Sundberg is skeptical.

“We don’t figure what we’re seeing has anything to do with CCD,” he said. “We now believe the Varroa mite was causing most of our losses, which came last fall. It’s my opinion that that’s what happening in a lot of cases.”

Varroa mites can only replicate in a honey bee colony. The mites attach to the body of a bee and weakens it by sucking its internal juices and spreads viruses to the bees.

A significant mite infestation will lead to the death of a honey bee colony, usually in the late fall through early spring.

The mites were inadvertently introduced into the U.S. in the 1980s.

These maladies weaken colonies and can lead to the collapse and death of colonies. Control has become increasingly difficult because the diseases and mites have developed resistance to some of the treatments.

Because of this, the Varroa mite has been the parasite with the most pronounced economic impact on the beekeeping industry, and been called a “contributing factor” to CCD.

Another symptom found in hives hit by the disorder is that adult workers simply fly away and disappear, leaving a small cluster of workers and the hive's young to fend for themselves.

A possible clue may be taken from the fact that nearby predators, such as the wax moth, are for some reason resisting from their typical behavior — moving in to pilfer honey and other hive contents from the abandoned hives. The CCD-affected honey remains untouched.

Honey bee colonies in the U.S. are overworked and under-appreciated.

They are the world’s most important pollinators of many fruits, vegetables and seed crops, contributing billions of dollars in value to agriculture and our diet, according to Marla Spivak, an entomologist specializing in apiculture with the University of Minnesota Extension.

Science continues to grapple with these bits of information, while across the 24 states affected, claimed losses by some apiary owners range up to 90 percent.

New treatments are currently available that reduce the risk of the pests developing resistance.

“Fortunately, colonies that die from diseases and mite parasites can be replaced with nursery stock,” Spivak said. “But overall, the number of bee colonies and beekeepers in the U.S. has been drastically reduced over the last 20 years.”


http://www.fergusfallsjournal.com/news/200...as-which-could/

Not just happening in the States either... Also happening in Canada...

QUOTE
Why are Niagara's bees dying?

Apr 17, 2007 04:30 AM
dana flavelle
business reporter

The sudden unexplained loss of millions of bees in the Niagara region – up to 90 per cent in some commercial colonies – has prompted Ontario beekeepers to ask experts at the University of Guelph to investigate.

The move comes amid the mysterious disappearance of millions of bees in the U.S., in a phenomenon so unusual that it has spawned a new phrase – "Colony Collapse Disorder."

In Canada, the problem seems to be confined so far to the Niagara region but is still early days for beekeepers in the West, who won't know the extent of the damage until they unwrap their hives later this month.

"About 80 or 90 per cent of the beekeepers in the Niagara region have had substantial losses," George Dubanow, president of the Niagara Beekeepers Association, said in an interview yesterday.

"This number is unparalleled. A typical winter loss is between 10 and 20 per cent."

That has some Niagara region fruit growers worried in the weeks leading up to the May pollination period because bees don't just make honey. They also play a vital role in pollinating everything from cherries to pear trees in Ontario, hybrid canola in Western Canada and blueberries in New Brunswick.

As much as a third of the food we eat requires bee pollination, according to experts. Bee pollination is valued at $1 billion in Canada.

Theories about why the bees are dying run the gamut from pesticides to poor weather and even radio waves from cell phone transmission towers.

Experts in Canada are reluctant to blame "Colony Collapse Disorder" for what's happened so far in Niagara.

"At this point we haven't seen the type of die-offs we're seeing in the U.S. although we're all certainly very concerned about it, said Steve Pernal, a research scientist with Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, in northern Alberta.

Officials in Ontario blame poor weather conditions last fall and the Varroa Destructor mite, a deadly parasite that first showed up in the early '90s.

"The reason I say that is you can almost draw a line from St. Thomas to the south side of Hamilton. Below that they've lost 70 per cent of their bees with some individuals losing 100 per cent. North of that line, thank goodness, the bees are quite normal," explained Doug McRory, an apiarist with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food.

Winter die-offs aren't unusual for beekeepers. And while 20 per cent is the average, sometimes an individual beekeeper's losses will be much higher, experts said.

However, the U.S. has now received reports from 24 states citing widespread losses. And more worrisome is the unexplained disappearance of the adult bees, a report to Congress two weeks ago stated.

It's as if the bees flew away and never came back, highly uncharacteristic behaviour, the report by U.S. agriculture analyst Renee Johnson said.

"The odds are some neurotoxin is what's causing it," said David VanderDussen, a beekeeper in Frankford, near Trenton, whose company NOD Apiary Products Ltd. recently won a provincial award for developing an environmentally friendly mite repellent.

Len Troup, a fruit grower in Jordan Station who also chairs the Ontario Tender Fruit Producers, says farmers in the area starting renting commercial bees to pollinate the cherry and pear crops, starting around mid-May.

Niagara beekeepers say the problem in the U.S. is driving up the price of Queen Bees imported from New Zealand to replenish the hives.
QUOTE


Cell phones hurting bee populations?

Apiculture world abuzz over theory that cellphone radiation may be killing bees

Sheryl Ubelacker, Canadian Press

Published: Tuesday, April 17, 2007

  
TORONTO (CP) — A mysterious malady that is causing honeybees to disappear en masse from their hives in parts of North America and Europe may be linked to radiation from cellphones and other high-tech communications devices, a study by German researchers suggests.

While the theory has created a lot of buzz in the beekeeping world, apiarists say there could be any number of reasons why the bees are deserting their hives and presumably dying off in large numbers, including changing weather patterns and mite or other kinds of infestations.

What they do agree on is that whatever is causing the phenomenon, known as colony collapse disorder (CCD), it is playing havoc with the production of honey and other products from the hive — and threatening the growing of fruit and vegetable crops, which depend on bees for pollination.

The small study, led by Prof. Jochen Kuhn of Landau University, suggests that radiation from widely used cellphones may mess up the bees’ homing abilities by interfering with the neurological mechanisms that govern learning and memory. It also appears to disrupt the insects’ ability to communicate with each other.

To conduct the study, Kuhn placed cellphone handsets near hives and observed that radiation in the frequency range of 900 to 1800 megahertz caused the bees to avoid their homes.

But Brent Halsall, president of the Ontario Beekeepers’ Association, said there are a lot of notions about what’s causing bee colonies to dissolve like honey in a hot cup of tea.

High-frequency electromagnetic radiation from cellphones could be a factor, he acknowledged, but so could many other influences.

“Everybody’s got their own little pet theory, but it’s really hard to say,” Halsall said from his home just south of Ottawa, where he keeps about 200 hives. “The bottom line for us as beekeepers is the industry in Ontario is already under a lot of stress because the bulk wholesale price of honey is below the cost of production.”

There are about 10,000 beekeepers in Canada, operating a total of 600,000 honeybee colonies, says the Canadian Honey Council on its website. The majority are commercially operated, with Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba producing 80 per cent of Canada’s 154 million kilograms of honey annually.

It’s been a tough winter for Ontario’s 150 to 250 commercial apiarists, who have lost about 23,000 of their 76,000 hives. Those lost hives, which at full capacity in summer house about 60,000 bees apiece, represent the loss of about $5 million worth of the industrious insects, he said.

“I think weather might be one of the big factors this year,” Halsall said. “We had a very warm winter until mid-January and then, bang, it got cold.”

From what he’s observed so far in his hives, Halsall believes he’s lost about half of his bees.

In some of his colonies, eggs had been laid and it appeared adult bees had been trying to keep the new brood alive in the face of the sudden drop in temperature. “There was honey inches away, but they probably starved to death as they tried to protect the brood.”

Still, he thinks that whatever the causes of honeybee deaths in Ontario, and likely in the rest of Canada, they are different from those decimating hives in the United States.

In at least 24 states, bees have been dying in droves, with some commercial apiarists reporting huge losses, the American Beekeeping Federation reports on its website. “One lost 11,000 of his 13,000 colonies; another 700 of 900, another 2,500 of 3,500, another virtually all of his 10,000.”

U.S. beekeepers estimate that more than one-quarter of their 2.4 billion colonies have been affected by CCD.

The American bee population had already been under threat in recent years from the varroa mite, a tiny parasite that devastated many keepers’ hives and destroyed most wild honey bee populations.

While the varroa mite is also a problem in Canada, treatments to rid it from hives differ here compared with south of the border, and Halsall said his hives were virtually mite-free by the time winter arrived. Still, he and some other keepers have had huge losses in their hives.

“The bottom line is: We’ve got a problem in Ontario. There’s a lot less bees than we used to have and we don’t know why.”

“It could be many different factors that are causing the bees to die or all of them together are enough to cause the problem and we just have the right set of wrong circumstances coming together.”


http://www.canada.com/topics/technology/ne...57a1d77&k=86662

This post has been edited by DarmonVing on Apr 19 2007, 08:47 PM


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Posted: May 1 2007, 09:49 PM
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The mystery deepens.

QUOTE
Bee Swarm Shuts Ark. Hospital's ER 

May 1 05:18 PM US/Eastern
       


LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) - A swarm of bees clustered outside the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Medical Center shut down the emergency room Monday, as officials waited for a beekeeper to come vacuum up the 7,000 insects.
Although no one was stung, the Little Rock emergency room still decided to be closed for ambulance traffic.

"We'll take walk-ins, but ambulances are being diverted to other hospitals," UAMS spokeswoman Andrea Peel said.

Doctors did not see any patients with bee stings, but emergency room physician Dr. Delaney Kinchen said it was an important precaution to close the ER while clearing out the bees.

"I've been stung thousands of times and never had any problems, but I know people who've been stung twice and almost died," he said.

Beekeeper Harvey Johnston arrived Monday afternoon to remove the beehive.

"Somewhere around here was a beehive that got overcrowded," he said. "When bees get crowded, (the queen) leaves and takes a portion of the bees with her."

The emergency room reopened shortly after 2 p.m., Peel said.


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Posted: May 1 2007, 11:05 PM
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I was thinking.... I'd wager that the African Killer Bee scare which started in the 1980s has lead to the extermination and/or eradication of millions and millions of bees.

Of course, our zionist news media always fueled those fears of African Killer Bees as they feed us one fear tactic after another while filling our heads with their lies and their agendas.




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Posted: May 5 2007, 11:07 PM
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QUOTE (Mark J. Harper @ May 2 2007, 02:05 AM)
I was thinking.... I'd wager that the African Killer Bee scare which started in the 1980s has lead to the extermination and/or eradication of millions and millions of bees.

Of course, our zionist news media always fueled those fears of African Killer Bees as they feed us one fear tactic after another while filling our heads with their lies and their agendas.

Yeah it could be possible that a lot of bees could have been mistaken for killer bees and exterminated but maybe they're just keeping a low profile for some reason... But I have heard a few reports of bees falling out of the sky and dying in some places but nothing has turned up on the internet except for one small piece of video showing a bee dying... I've been checking the bumblebees, wasps and yellow-jackets that have just started to emerge and they seem healthy enough... Haven't seen a honey bee yet though...

Ahhhhhhhhh.... Another missing bee report.... Missing bees in Long Island too...



QUOTE
Honey bees disappearing on LI, nationally
BY JENNIFER SMITH

May 5, 2007, 8:25 PM EDT

For decades, the owners of Wickham's Fruit Farm in Cutchogue tended beehives scattered among their orchards and squash patches. Their bees produced honey for the farm stand and pollinated much of what was grown there.

But in recent years, fewer bees survived the winter, silencing once-buzzing hives even as the apple trees came into bloom. Eventually, the Wickhams gave in and rented hives from a professional beekeeper to ensure they would have enough bees to stay in business.

From the apple and pear trees to blueberries, squash and pumpkins, about half of farm's 200 cultivated acres need honeybees to pollinate their flowers and produce a new crop. "Twenty years ago we didn't worry too much about it, but you just can't take chances," co-owner Tom Wickham said. "There aren't enough wild bees out there to do the job."

That point was rammed home this winter, when beekeepers across the United States reported dramatic honeybee losses that herald a new threat to an insect already under siege.

Imported from Europe centuries ago, honeybees are a linchpin of the nation's food supply. They pollinate more than 90 commercial crops in the United States -- everything from Wickham's apples to kiwis, alfalfa and cranberries.

Native bees here don't provide the kind of large-scale pollination demanded by modern farming. But managed colonies of honeybees, which efficiently pollinate a variety of crops, help ensure bigger, more bountiful fruits and vegetables. They add about $200 million in value to crops grown in New York state, according to Nicholas Calderone, an associate professor of entomology at Cornell University in Ithaca and director of the Dyce Laboratory for Honeybee Studies.

Yet their status here is far from stable. Starting in the mid 1980s, parasitic mites began killing off significant number of honeybees and decimated much of North America's so-called "feral" honeybees -- bees that left their beekeepers' man-made hives to form colonies in the wild. One mite, the Varroa destructor, still poses arguably the most significant threat to honeybees worldwide because it continues to develop resistance to the various pesticides used to treat afflicted bee colonies.

But something was different with some of this year's deaths. In about one-quarter of the cases, strong colonies suddenly appeared to dwindle, leaving few or no bees behind.

Cause, solution unknown

No one yet knows what caused the troubling phenomenon -- or how to prevent it from happening again.

"It's like Alzheimer's," said Raymond Lackey, a beekeeper from Bohemia who has tended honeybees in his backyard for 25 years. "It's as if they went out for a flight and never came back, and no one knows why."
QUOTE
Last updated May 4, 2007 11:48 p.m. PT

Beekeepers buzzing about dying colonies
Researchers work to find cause of abnormal die-off
By AMY ROLPH
P-I REPORTER

At a crowded booth at Pike Place Market, Arlington-based Moon Valley Organics sells jars of honey, bags of beeswax and tins and bottles of other honeybee products.

So far, Moon Valley's owner, Kim Denend, has yet to see any obvious signs of a mysterious killer that seems to be wiping out many of the nation's honeybees and, in turn, threatening America's food supply. But that doesn't mean Denend's honeybee colonies haven't seen their share of troubles.

"This is actually just another sign of things that have been going wrong with the bees for the last 10 years," she said. "Bees in general are having a difficult time, and they have been for a long time."

In the past few months, U.S. beekeepers have lost a quarter of their colonies -- or about five times the normal winter losses -- because of what scientists have dubbed colony collapse disorder. The problem started in November and seems to have spread to 27 states, with similar collapses reported in Brazil, Canada and parts of Europe.

One of the states reportedly affected is Washington, but Washington State University researcher Steve Shepherd said he hasn't heard of many reports firsthand. And though some experts say honeybee die-offs could have a devastating effect on America's dinner plates, Shepherd isn't planning on saying goodbye to fruits and vegetables anytime soon.


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Posted: May 6 2007, 01:56 AM
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When I was kid here in Los Angeles, there were always bees everywhere. I got stung a couple times by accident too!

Nowadays... I hardly see them anywhere.




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QUOTE
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~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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