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IMPORTANT TOPICS

1. U.S. NEWS MEDIA CAN LEGALLY LIE TO YOU
There is no law preventing the U.S. news media from intentionally lying to the public. Whistle blowers and honest reporters are fired for telling the truth.

2. FLUORIDE IS A TOXIN/POISON
Read the Poison Warning label on your toothpaste, then call the 800# and ask;
"Why do you put poison in my toothpaste?"

3. NEW FLU VACCINE IS LOADED WITH MERCURY
by Dr. Joseph Mercola

4. PEDOPHILES IN HIGH PLACES
Also: Conspiracy of Silence Video

5. ASPARTAME IS HARMFUL
Equal, Nutra-Sweet and over 6000 food and beverage products contain Aspartame

6. On September 10, 2001, Donald Rumsfeld held a press conference to disclose that over $2,000,000,000,000 (2 Trillion) in Pentagon funds could not be accounted for.
Such a disclosure normally would have sparked a huge scandal. However, the commencement of the [9/11] attack on the World Trade Center and The Pentagon the following morning would assure that the story remained buried.


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> Mystery Of The Dead Journalists


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Posted: Mar 7 2005, 03:11 PM
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Reading about the ‘accidental’ shooting by US forces at the car of newly released Italian journalist hostage, Guiana Sgrena, killing Italian Inteligence officer Nicola Calipari and injuring two others made me wonder about the death toll of journalists world wide.

In 2004, 129 Journalists were killed throughout the world, the worst 12-month death toll on record.

QUOTE

After one of the worst years on record for the killing of journalists, the International Federation of Journalists today launched its annual report on media deaths with a renewed call for the United States and other governments to take seriously their responsibility to investigate media killings.

“Too often governments display a heartless and cruel indifference to the suffering endured by the victims and their families,” said Aidan White, IFJ General Secretary.

“Too often so-called investigations into the killings of our colleagues are merely a whitewashing exercise.”

http://www.harlandco.com/download/kill_list_2004_lores.pdf

http://www.ifj.org/default.asp?index=2903&Language=EN




The high number of journalists killed will perhaps help put into context a possible reason why so many high profile and well paid TV and Print journalists follow the party line without murmur, and won’t speak out.

Especially when so many deaths seem to be suspicious.

These deaths are not confined to war zones and in America three notable deaths in recent times raise suspicion;
QUOTE

The "suicide" deaths of Hunter Thompson, Gary Webb and J.H. Hatfield show that reporters who expose the criminal activities of our political elite risk their lives.
 
They are on the front line of freedom. When they are killed, it means very bad things are in store for us.

http://rense.com/general63/mak.htm

In 2003, 61 Journalists were reported killed, or missing, 21 of them in Iraq.

To put that number into perspective, during the war period,
17 journalists were killed or missing,
compared to 132 US and 32 UK personnel.

That is 13% of the number of US and over 50% of UK casualties,
and many of these were the result of so called (misnamed) 'Friendly Fire'.

No real surprise then that truth was, and remains, 'missing in action'.

WF





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Posted: Mar 7 2005, 03:20 PM
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Roll Call to the 61 Journalists killed or missing that I could find for 2003

Deatails about their demise within these sources:-
http://www.cpj.org/killed/killed03.html
http://www.cpj.org/Briefings/2003/missing_list_03.html
http://www.guardian.co.uk/Iraq/Story/0,2763,928043,00.html

QUOTE


BRAZIL: 2
Nicanor Linhares Batista, Rádio Vale do Jaguaribe, June 30, 2003, Limoeiro do Norte
Luiz Antônio da Costa, Época, July 23, 2003, São Bernardo do Campo

CAMBODIA 1
Chou Chetharith, Ta Prum, October 18, 2003, Phnom Penh

COLOMBIA: 7
Luis Eduardo Alfonso Parada, Radio Meridiano-70, March 18, 2003, Arauca
Guillermo Bravo Vega, Alpevisión Radio, April 28, 2003, Neiva
Jaime Rengifo Revero, Olímpica Radio, April 29, 2003, Maicao
Juan Carlos Benavides Arévalo, Manantial Estéreo, August 22, 2003, Puerto Caicedo
Oscar Salazar Jaramillo, Radio Sevilla, March 10, 2003, Sevilla
José Emeterio Rivas, Radio Calor Estéreo, April 6, 2003, Barrancabermeja
William Soto Cheng, Telemar, December 18, 2003, Buenaventura

DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO: 1 missing
Acquitté Kisembo, Agence France-Presse, June 26, 2003, Bunia

GUATEMALA 1
Héctor Ramírez, Noti7 and Radio Sonora, July 24, 2003, Guatemala City

HONDURAS 1
Germán Antonio Rivas, Corporación Maya Visión, November 26, 2003, Santa Rosa de Copán

INDIA 2 + 1 missing
Parvaz Mohammed Sultan, News and Feature Alliance, January 31, 2003, Srinagar
Parmanand Goyal, Punjab Kesari, September 18, 2003, Kaithal
Indra Mohan Hakasam, Amar Assam, June 24, 2003, Goalpara

INDONESIA 2
Ersa Siregar, Rajawali Citra Televisi, December 29, 2003, Aceh
Mohamad Jamal, TVRI, Date unknown, Banda Aceh

IRAN 1
Zahra Kazemi, freelance, July 10, 2003, Tehran

IRAQ 19 +2 missing
Terry Lloyd, ITV News, March 22, 2003, near Al-Zubayr
Paul Moran, freelance, March 22, 2003, Gerdigo
Gaby Rado Channel Four News reporter  March 30 2003
Kaveh Golestan, freelance, April 2, 2003, Kifri
Michael Kelly, Atlantic Monthly and The Washington Post, April 3, 2003, outside of Baghdad
Kamaran Abdurazaq Muhamed, translator for the BBC, April 6 2003
David Bloom,  NBC correspondent April 6 2003
Christian Liebig, Focus, April 7, 2003, outside Baghdad
Julio Anguita Parrado, El Mundo, April 7, 2003, outside Baghdad
Tareq Ayyoub, Al-Jazeera, April 8, 2003, Baghdad
José Couso, Telecinco, April 8, 2003, Baghdad
Taras Protsyuk, Reuters, April 8, 2003, Baghdad
Iraqi interpreter, during kidnap of 3 Malaysian journalists Baghdad April 12 2003
Mario Podesto, Argentine America TV, April 14, 2003
Veronica Cabrera America TV, April 14, 2003
Richard Wild, freelance, July 5, 2003, Baghdad
Jeremy Little, NBC News, July 6, 2003, Fallujah
Mazen Dana, Reuters, August 17, 2003, outside Baghdad
Ahmed Shawkat, Bilah Ittijah, October 28, 2003, Mosul
Fred Nerac, ITV News, March 22, 2003, Iman Anas
Hussein Othman  March 22, 2003 Lebanese producer

ISRAEL AND THE OCCUPIED TERRITORIES 2
Nazih Darwazeh, Associated Press Television News, April 19, 2003, Nablus
James Miller, freelance, May 2, 2003, Rafah

IVORY COAST 2 + 1 missing
Jean Hélène, Radio France Internationale OCTOBER 21, 2003
Kloueu Gonzreu, Ivoirian Press Agency, Date unknown, Toulépleu
Guy-André Kieffer, freelance, April 16, 2004, Abidjan

JAPAN 1
Satoru Someya, freelance, Date unknown, Tokyo

KYRGYZSTAN 1
Ernis Nazalov, Kyrgyz Ruhu, September 15, 2003, Kara-Suu

LEBANON 1 missing
Kazem Akhavan, IRNA, July 4, 1982, Byblos

NEPAL 1
Gyanendra Khadka, Rastriya Samachar Samiti, September 7, 2003, Jyamire, Sindhupalchowk

PAKISTAN 1
Fazal Wahab, freelance, January 21, 2003, Mingora

PHILIPPINES 6
Apolinario "Polly" Pobeda, DWTI-AM radio, May 17, 2003, Lucena City, Quezon
Bonifacio Gregorio, Dyaryo Banat, July 8, 2003, La Paz, Tarlac
Noel Villarante, DZJV Radio and Laguna Score, August 19, 2003, Santa Cruz, Laguna Province
Rico Ramirez, DXSF Radio, August 20, 2003, Agusan del Sur
Juan "Jun" Pala, DXGO radio, September 6, 2003, Davao City
Nelson Nadura, Radio DYME, December 2, 2003, Masbate City

RUSSIA 2 + 1 missing
Aleksei Sidorov, Tolyatinskoye Obozreniye, October 9, 2003, Togliatti
Dmitry Shvets, TV-21 Northwestern Broadcasting, April 18, 2003, Murmansk
Ali Astamirov, Agence Frnace-Presse, July 4, 2003, Ingushetia, Russia

SOMALIA 1
Abdullahi Madkeer, DMC Radio, January 24, 2003, Baidoa

THAILAND 1
Surapong Ritthi, freelance, February 11, 2003, Patong Beach



They have my utmost respect.
WF







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Posted: Mar 7 2005, 03:46 PM
Quote Post
Another Iraq statistic.
QUOTE
More than 70 journalists and media workers have been killed in Iraq since the US-led invasion nearly two years ago. 50 of these were local Iraqis.

http://www.ifj.org/default.asp?index=2981&Language=EN



In 2004, 129 media related casualties were reported by the International Federation for Journalists during 2004, data from:-
http://www.ifj.org/default.asp?index=2868&Language=EN
Full background in this PDF link
http://www.harlandco.com/download/kill_list_2004_lores.pdf
http://www.cpj.org/index.html

QUOTE

Bangladesh
Manik Shaha correspondent and stringer
Humayun Kabir Balu editor
Kamal Hossain correspondent
Dipankar Chakroborty journalist and executive editor
Shahid Anwar Apollo assistant editor

Belarus
Veronika Cherkasova journalist

Brasil
Jorge Lourenço DosSantos
owner of a radio station and broadcastcommentator
Samuel Román journalist
José Carlos Araújo journalist
Nicolas Reynard photographer
Joel Donnet photographer
Ivan del Godinho journalist

Colombia
Alvaro Paúl Márquez Polo broadcaster
Oscar Alberto Polanco Herrera journalist
Martin la Rotta Duarte owner of a radio station
Jaime Alberto Madero Muñoz newspaper seller

Dominican Republic
Juan Emilio Andújar Matos radio host

Ecuador
Ricardo Mendoza driver
Wilson Fajardo radio broadcaster

Greece
Giorgios Xenoudakis editor and editor-in-chief

Guatemala
Miguel Angel Morales journalist

The Gambia
Deida Hydara correspondent and translator

Haiti
Ricardo Ortega television journalist

India
Veeraboina Yadagiri journalist
Kumar Bharti journalist
Naveen Kumar Verma journalist
Raju Soni TV cameraman
Dilip Mohapatra editor
Prashant Bhole reporter
R V Syed journalist

Iran
Kazim Akhbari journalist

Iraq
Duraid Isa Mohammed translator and producer
Yasser Khatab driver
Haymin Mohamed Salih TV journalist
Ayoub Mohamed Salih TV journalist
Safir Nader TV journalist
Abdel Sattar Abdel Karim photographer
Gharib Mohamed Salih TV journalist
Semko Karim Mohyideen freelance
Naseh Salim freelance
Kamiran Mohamed Omer freelance
Salah Saedouk editor
Shawket Shehk Yazdeen publisher
Mahdi Khoshnaw editor-in-chief
Mahdi Saad Abdulla editor-in-chief
Selwan Abdelghani Medhi Al-Niemi translator
Nadia Nasrat news anchor
Najeed Rashid technician
Muhammad Ahmad Sarham security guard
Ali Abdel Aziz cameraman
Ali Al-Khatib TV journalist
Burhan Mohammed Mazhour freelance cameraman
Omar Kamal translator
Assad Kadhim TV correspondent
Hussein Saleh driver
Waldemar Milewicz TV journalist
Mounir Beouamrani TV journalist
Hamid Rashid Wali assistant cameraman and fixer
Shinsuke Hashida freelance
Kotaro Ogawa freelance
Mohamed Najmedin interpreter
Mahmoud Ismael Daood bodyguard
Samia Abdeljabar driver
Sahar Saad Eddin Nuami editor-in-chief
Mahmoud Hamid Abbas cameraman
Hossam Ali freelance photographer
Ali Ghareeb driver and interpreter
Isam Al-Shumari cameraman
Enzo Baldoni freelance journalist
Mazen Al-Tomeizi TV journalist
Dina Mohammad Hassan TV journalist
Karam Hussein photographer
Liqaa Abdul-Razzaq TV journalist
Unknown translator
Ali Adnan security guard
Hassan Alwan engineer
Ramziya Moushee kitchen staff
Alahin Hussein kitchen staff
Nabil Hussein gardener
Dhia Najim cameraman

Ivory Coast
Antoine Massé correspondent
Guy-André Kieffer freelance investigative reporter

Kazakhstan
Askhat Sharipajanov online editor

Mexico
Roberto Javier Mora García editor
Francisco Javier Ortíz Franco deputy director of a newspaper
Francisco Arratía Saldierna newspaper columnist
Gregorio Rodríguez Hernández photographer
Leodegario Aguilera Lúcas editor

Nepal
Padma Raj Devkota editor and correspondent
Kanyaras Gurung driver
Dekendra Raj Thapa radio journalist
Badri Khadka regional reporter

The Netherlands
Theo Van Gogh journalist and film maker
Nicaragua
María Jose Bravo journalist
Carlos Guadamuz journalist

Pakistan
Sajid Tanoli reporter
Palestinian Territories
Khalil al-Zabin journalist
Mohammed Abu Halima producer and radio host

Peru
Antonio de la Torre Echeandía journalist
Alberto Rivera Fernández journalist

Philippines
Rowell Endrinal radio commentator
Isabelo Maghuyo radio announcer
Eliseo Binoya radio commentator and station manager
Roger Mariano broadcast journalist
Arnel Malano radio correspondent
Jonathan Abayon radio broadcaster
Fernando Consignado radio correspondent
Romeo Binungcal correspondent
Eldy Gabinales radio commentator
Gene Boyd Lumawag photojournalist
Heherson Hinolan radio journalist
Michael Llorin freelance photojournalist
Allan Dizon photojournalist

Romania
Elena Popescu TV journalist
Ionut Barbu TV journalist

Russia
Adlan Khasanov cameraman
Pavel Khlebnikov editor
Vladimir Pritchin editor-in-chief

Saudi Arabia
Simon Cumbers cameraman

Serbia and Montenegro
Dusko Jovanovic director and editor-in-chief

Sri Lanka
Aiyathurai Nadesan freelance journalist
Kandasamy Iyer Balanadarajah journalist, writer and political activist
Lal Jayasundara photojournalist

Taiwan
Ping Chung-cheng TV cameraman

Ukraine
Yuriy Chechyk director of radio station

USA
Matthew Moore television journalist

Venezuela
Mauro Marcano journalist

Yemen
Mohammed Salem Al-Sagheer journalist and editor-in-chief

Zimbabwe
Masimba Albert Karikoga editor




WF





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Posted: Mar 7 2005, 05:34 PM
Quote Post
Hi, WF! Good reporting. As I read over the list of countries, Afghanistan is missing. There were some journalists there who didn't make it home. They went the way of the dead microbioligists. Wonder what profession is the next target.

BJ


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Posted: Mar 7 2005, 06:28 PM
Quote Post
Hey Without Fear - awesome post and information for the archives.

Yeah BJ,
Afghanistan and USA are missing - I'm sure we have some journalists who have died under mysterious circumstances here in AmeriKa.

EDIT: 3 American Journalists from WF's post above.
QUOTE
The "suicide" deaths of Hunter Thompson, Gary Webb and J.H. Hatfield show that reporters who expose the criminal activities of our political elite risk their lives.
 
They are on the front line of freedom. When they are killed, it means very bad things are in store for us.

http://rense.com/general63/mak.htm


I see James Miller is there. His name is forever etched into my mind when he was killed while filming as the Israeli/Nazis demolished Palestinian homes to make way for more of their bretheren.

Rachel Corrie, Brian Avery and Tom Hurndall were also killed while trying to help the people of Palestine. The invaders truly have no compassion and it shows in their works and deeds.

Thank you Without Fear for posting this!

Perhaps Seralia can help add to this research when time permits.




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QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Mar 9 2005, 09:31 AM
Quote Post
Great Info


Great Work WF cheers2.gif




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Posted: Dec 8 2005, 06:48 PM
Quote Post
QUOTE
78 journalists die in Iran crash
Siber World News Team
07 December 2005
QUOTE
Reporters who arrived to cover the disaster wept when they realized many of the dead were colleagues. State television played mournful music as it broadcast images of people killed in the crash.

"I was supposed to be on the plane as well, so I don't know whether to be happy or sad," a journalist from the ISNA student news agency told Reuters.

The plane was bound for the port city of Chabahar on the Gulf of Oman, where Iran's military was conducting military exercises. It took off at about 1:35 p.m. from the military section of the airport.

TEHRAN: A military cargo plane attempting an emergency landing Tuesday in Tehran clipped an apartment building and crashed short of the runway, killing at least 115 people, including 78 journalists who were en route to cover military maneuvers in southern Iran. The victims also included 21 people who were either in apartments that were engulfed in flames or cars near the base of the 10-storey building.

Authorities said all 84 passengers and 10 crew members died on the US-built C-130 aircraft.

"There were four apartments on each floor. Thirty-six apartments burned completely," Amir Rasouli, 24, said tearfully at Hazrat Rasoul Akram Hospital, where he learned his cousin was among the dead. "They managed to evacuate most of the residents, but my cousin was not lucky enough."

Iranian news agencies said the pilot reported engine trouble shortly after taking off from Mehrabad International Airport in southwestern Tehran. The aircraft was circling back for an emergency landing when its wing struck the building in the Towhid complex, one of many medium-rise concrete residential buildings adjacent to the airport.

The complex was reserved for military families, many of whom were home at the time.

"I was in my room when I heard a terrible explosion from the block next to us," said Mitra Aslani, 16, who like all students in Tehran stayed home from school on Tuesday because of an air pollution alert.

"Then there was fire on that block," she said.

State news agencies said police at the scene found several children among the dead. "Some people were throwing themselves out of windows to escape the flames. I saw two die like that," one policeman told the Reuters news agency.

Maysam Kamrava, whose leg was broken during the crush of people rushing out of the burning building, was among about 90 people injured in the incident.

"He is all right, but only God knows how shocked we are," said his mother, Manijeh Kamrava, 29, in the crowded emergency room at Hazrat Rasoul. "I heard a terrible explosion, and after a few seconds I heard people shouting, 'Fire!' We rushed to the stairs, which were packed with smoke. I lost my son, Maysam. A few minutes later the firemen came and helped us out of the building."

Rescue crews and bystanders carried away the wounded in blankets,. but riot police forced back distraught neighbors and relatives who tried to push past an iron gate to look for survivors.

Reporters who arrived to cover the disaster wept when they realized many of the dead were colleagues. State television played mournful music as it broadcast images of people killed in the crash.

"I was supposed to be on the plane as well, so I don't know whether to be happy or sad," a journalist from the ISNA student news agency told Reuters.

The plane was bound for the port city of Chabahar on the Gulf of Oman, where Iran's military was conducting military exercises. It took off at about 1:35 p.m. from the military section of the airport.

Mehrabad, an aging but convenient airport, has remained open despite the completion last year of the much larger Imam Khomeini International Airport, about 30 miles south of Tehran.

The cause of the crash was not reported, but state television said officials had ruled out sabotage. There have been three major fatal aircraft accidents in Iran since 2002.

News reports said the Lockheed C-130, a four-engine turbo-prop, may have been acquired from the United States when Iran was a U.S. ally and ruled by Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi. The monarchy was overthrown by the 1979 revolution that established an Islamic state.

U.S. trade sanctions against Iran have led to chronic shortages of aircraft spare parts. The Bush administration this year held out the possibility of lifting the sanction on airline parts as a bargaining chip in negotiations over the future of Iran's nuclear program.

"We see lots of airplanes landing in the airport every day," said Sadegh Jalaliyan, who noticed the C-130 while smoking a cigarette in the yard of the dairy factory south of the airport where he works. "I immediately recognized something was wrong with it. It was unusually low.

"I shouted to my friends and showed them the plane. Then there was a terrible explosion and a huge column of thick smoke."

http://www.sibernews.com/the_news/world_ne...h_200512072940/




--------------------
QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Dec 9 2005, 12:32 PM
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sadoriginal.gif I guess someone doesn't want any witnesses. Very suspicious. Strangely, this story hasn't gotten too much coverage.


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Posted: Dec 10 2005, 09:54 AM
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What is the total to date? Including the others killed attempting to cover Afghanistan?

Does anyone know the number of journalist casualties for other wars/conflicts (i.e Vietnam, Korea, Gulf War I)


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Posted: Dec 12 2005, 05:40 PM
Quote Post
QUOTE
Explosion kills prominent Lebanese editor
12/12/2005 - 10:30:14
Anti-Syrian journalist and politician Gibran Tueni was killed by a car bomb this morning, a day after he returned from France, where he had been staying periodically for fear of assassination.

Tueni’s uncle, Telecommunications Minister Marwan Hamadeh, and the leading Lebanese politician Walid Jumblatt blamed Syria for the bombing – a charge that Syria promptly denied.

The political leader of the Druse community, Jumblatt said the bombing was intended to silence a voice who had sought those responsible for the February assassination of former Prime Minister Rafik Hariri.

“This is a new terrorism message,” Jumblatt said of the killing, referring to Hariri’s assassination and the mysterious series of subsequent bombings that have targeted mainly Lebanese opposed to Syrian influence in Lebanon.

Hamadeh threatened to withdraw from the Cabinet with two colleagues if the government did not demand a UN investigation into the continuing series of bombings.

He said there must be an international tribunal to “investigate the continuing crimes of the Syrian regime.”

Syrian Information Minister Mehdi Dakhlallah denied his government was involved, telling LBC television: “Those who are behind this are the enemies of Lebanon.”

http://signs-of-the-times.org/signs/signs.htm




--------------------
QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Jan 13 2006, 05:05 PM
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The Toll: 1995-2004

Each year in January, the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) publishes a list of journalists killed in the line of duty around the world. This list has become the most widely cited press freedom statistic and is often seen as a barometer of the state of global press freedom.

While the correlation between the number of journalists killed and the state of press freedom in a particular country is far from exact—no journalists have been killed in Cuba, for example, and only one has been killed in China during the last decade—the annual list does give some sense of the range of risks that journalists face in reporting the news. To provide a more complete statistical picture, CPJ releases a list of journalists killed during the last decade. The list has been broken down by year, country, and a variety of other categories.

Methodology
As with all of its casework, CPJ applies strict journalistic standards when investigating a journalist's murder. We consider a case “confirmed” only if our research confirms or strongly suggests that a journalist was likely killed in direct reprisal for his or her work or in cross fire while carrying out a dangerous assignment. We do not include journalists who are killed in accidents—such as car or plane crashes—unless the crash was caused by hostile action (for example, if a plane were shot down or a car crashed trying to avoid gunfire).

If the motives are unclear, but it is possible that a journalist was killed because of his or her work, CPJ classifies the case as “unconfirmed” and continues to investigate to determine the motive for the murder. For this 10-year statistical analysis, we used only confirmed cases.

While we believe that this list is both comprehensive and accurate, we generally have more detailed information about more recent cases. Our staff has grown over the years, and new technology such as the Internet and e-mail have made it much easier to report on the killing of journalists, even in remote places.

Murdered with impunity
During the last decade, 341 journalists have been killed while carrying out their work. While conflict and war provide the backdrop to much of the violence against the press, CPJ research demonstrates that the vast majority of journalists killed since 1995 did not die in cross fire. Instead, they were hunted down and murdered, often in direct reprisal for their reporting. In fact, according to CPJ statistics, only 68 journalists (20 percent) died in cross fire, while 247 (72 percent) were murdered often in reprisal for their reporting. The remaining journalists were killed in conflict situations that cannot be described as combat—while covering violent street demonstrations, for example.

Since 1995, CPJ has recorded only 35 cases in which the person or persons who ordered a journalist's murder have been arrested and prosecuted. That means that in more than 85 percent of the cases, those who murder journalists do so with impunity. In many cases, journalists are murdered either to prevent them from reporting on corruption or human rights abuses, or to punish them after they have done so. The brazenness of the killers is suggested by the fact that 60 of the 246 journalists who were murdered during the last decade were threatened before they were killed.

In 23 cases since 1995, journalists were kidnapped—taken alive by militants, criminals, guerrillas, or government forces—and subsequently killed. The kidnapping and murder of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl in early 2002 highlighted this terrible phenomenon. In several cases, notably in Algeria and Turkey, journalists have simply “disappeared” after being taken into government custody.

Who are they?
Photographing and recording combat are among the most dangerous assignments in journalism, and during the last decade 62 cameramen, photographers and soundmen have been killed. The majority of them died in cross fire in places such as Sierra Leone, Iraq, Yugoslavia, and Russia. But others were deliberately murdered because of images they had captured. In January 1997, the charred and handcuffed body of Argentine photographer José Luis Cabezas was found in a rental car in a resort city near Buenos Aires. He had been killed because he had managed to photograph a reclusive business tycoon reputed to be the head of the Argentine mafia.

Sixty-one radio reporters were also killed during the last decade. The surprisingly high number highlights the importance of radio worldwide, particularly in isolated regions. Local radio reporters are exposed to heightened risk precisely because they are largely invisible to the outside world while being extremely visible in the communities where they report. Six of the eight journalists killed in the Philippines in 2004 were provincial radio journalists known for aggressive local political reporting.

At the other end of the spectrum are American journalists, either in the United States or overseas. U.S. reporters working abroad tend to be extremely visible, to be employed by powerful news outlets, and to work in danger zones for relatively short periods of times. While killings of U.S. journalists understandably generate intensive media coverage in the United States, they are relatively rare. In fact, only nine of the 340 journalists killed during the last decade were American.

Most dangerous years / most dangerous countries
The deadliest year in the last decade was 2004, when 57 journalists were killed. That was followed by 1995, when 51 were killed; and 2003, when 40 journalists were killed.

The deadliest country for journalists in the last decade is Iraq, where 38 journalists have been killed from the beginning of hostilities through 2004. Another 18 media support workers were killed in Iraq during that time.

Iraq replaced Algeria as the deadliest country over the decade. A total of 33 journalists were killed in Algeria since 1995, making it the second deadliest country during that time. It’s worth noting that the decade-long snapshot encompasses only the tail end of 1993-96 civil conflict in Algeria that claimed the lives of 58 journalists. The Algerian conflict began after the government canceled elections in 1992 to prevent the Islamic Salvation Front from winning power.

In Russia, 29 journalists have been killed during the last decade. Many were killed covering the conflict in the breakaway republic of Chechnya, but at least 11 have been murdered in contract-style killings in the four years after President Vladimir Putin came to power. Among them was Paul Klebnikov, the American-born editor of Forbes Russia who was gunned down outside his office in Moscow in July 2004.

Lawlessness and war are also major threats to press freedom in Colombia, where 30 journalists have been killed since 1995. No journalists were killed there in reprisal for their work during 2004, but Colombian journalists say this is because provincial reporters are simply too afraid to cover the ongoing civil conflict.

A rash of journalist murders in the Philippines during 2004 brought the 10-year total there to 22. At least 48 Philippine journalists have been killed with impunity since democracy was restored in 1986.

Sixteen journalists have been killed in India since 1995, many victims in the dispute over Kashmir.

What does it mean?
The war in Iraq has highlighted the risk that journalists confront in covering conflict. Yet despite the death toll there, the 10-year statistics make clear that local journalists covering crime, corruption, and human rights violations continue to face the greatest risk. Even in Iraq, most of those killed have been local journalists. Covering combat is risky, but a much greater threat than a stray bullet are the murderers who kill journalists deliberately, using the generalized violence associated with war to cover their tracks.

Increasing safety for local journalists working in dangerous places means giving them greater visibility, and that means publicizing attacks against them. Doing so is one way to fight impunity for those who murder journalists, which is the single greatest threat to the physical survival of the press around the world.

(from cache for http://www.cpj.org/killed/Ten_Year_Killed/Intro.html which has suffered from a bad case of linkrot)

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Posted: Jan 14 2006, 10:04 PM
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Thanks Quemoni,
This number below does not include plane or car accidents which we know can easily be used as tools for murder and elimination.
QUOTE
During the last decade, 341 journalists have been killed while carrying out their work.


I found it interesting that NO journalist has ever been reportedly killed in Cuba and only one has been killed in China in the past decade.

I recall hearing that a journalist for the CSM (Christian Science Monitor) was recently kidnapped in Iraq - we are told allegedly by insurgents.

The CSM was known for its honest and truthful reporting on the horrid conditions in Iraq caused by allied forces so it makes little sense to me for the Iraqis to kidnap her to help their cause. It's like shooting yourself in the foot. Which it seems the Iraqis are constantly doing by blowing up their own citizens.

It makes no sense, unless of course, the Iraqis are not blowing up their own people or kidnapping journalists who report the truth.

If I recall, Iraq had no terrorism or suicide bombings until the allied forces invaded.

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"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
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Posted: Jan 17 2006, 04:21 PM
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Was NYT's David Rosenbaum Assassinated?
By Kurt Nimmo
1-12-6
QUOTE
The blogger Xymphora makes several good points about the supposed mugging-murder of the New York Times' recently retired journalist, David Rosenbaum, most notably the fact the crime did not resemble a normal mugging.

Thus we must consider the possibility that Rosenbaum was assassinated for reasons that are not clear and probably never will be. Xymphora speculates that Rosenbaum "might reveal some of the secrets behind the odd relationship of the Times to the Bush Administration (holding stories of extreme national importance back for a year, and engaging in discussion of what news is 'fit to print'), or behind the campaign of lies told by the Times to help the Bush Administration trick the American people into the attack on Iraq."

As well, it should be noted that Rosenbaum's final Times piece, published in late December, revealed that Samuel Alito Jr., Bush's Supreme Court nominee, had written a 1984 memorandum as a government lawyer in the Reagan administration "arguing that top officials should not be subject to lawsuits in any circumstances, including when they knowingly violated the law." Alito's memo "offered recommendations concerning a lawsuit against a former attorney general, John N. Mitchell, over a wiretap he had authorized in 1970 without a court's permission," Rosenbaum wrote.

Rosenbaum's article, co-written with Adam Liptak, prompted the neocon White House to state "that the issues raised in Mr. Alito's 1984 memorandum were not the same as those posed by President Bush's orders to the National Security Agency to eavesdrop on international communications without court permission." Moreover, the Alito memo set off alarm bells in Congress and apparently endangers, at least minimally and superficially, his assured confirmation to the Supreme Court. "Within hours of the release of the 1984 memorandum, Senator Charles E. Schumer of New York, a Democrat on the Judiciary Committee, wrote to Judge Alito that he intended to question him about warrantless wiretapping during the judge's confirmation hearings for the Supreme Court next month. And another Democratic member of the committee, Senator Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts, said, 'The questions surrounding the Alito nomination get more troublesome every day,'" Liptak and Rosenbaum wrote.

Is it possible Rosenbaum was assassinated in order to send a strong message to the corporate media to tow the line? Of course, the corporate media has more or less dutifully disseminated the neocon line-from the so-called "war on terrorism" (rife with lies and fakery) to selling the Straussian neocon invasion of Iraq (more lies and outright fabrication)-but even so, the New York Times' primary goal is to sell newspapers and enrich stockholders and no doubt the NSA snoop "scandal," splashed across headlines a year late, sold a few extra copies of the "Gray Lady" and also restored to a certain degree the newspaper's reputation in the wake of the fact it served (primarily through the neocon shill Judith Miller) as a propaganda organ for the Straussian total war agenda, beginning with the invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq.

As we know, the neocon Pentagon has vigorously instituted the "Salvador Option" in Iraq-that is to say, the Pentagon has organized and unleashed, in part, paramilitary death squads, as an integral component of its counterinsurgency doctrine based on the model of Nazi suppression of partisan insurgents, as Michael McClintock documents (Instruments of Statecraft: U.S. Guerilla Warfare, Counterinsurgency, and Counterterrorism, 1940-1990; chapter 3, The Legacy of World War II). Obviously, as the NSA snoop revelations reveal, the neocons believe "counterinsurgency" is required in America and thus it is not a stretch to speculate that journalists in this country are possible targets, as are their counterparts in Iraq. For instance, consider the assassination of Steven Vincent, a writer and blogger who made the deadly mistake of reporting the news in Basra. I wrote last August:

As the Los Angeles Times reported, one of Vincent's abductors was "an Interior Ministry employee," and a witness was told it was the "duty" of the U.S.-installed puppet government to grab people off the street and murder them. "A few hours later, the journalist's body was found dumped by a road outside the city, with multiple bullet wounds to the head. He suffered bruises to his face and shoulder, had been blindfolded and his hands were tied in front with plastic wire." Smells like democracy to me.

It's no secret the Interior Ministry is under the control of the CIA, as reported by Knight Ridder on May 8, 2005. "Right after Saddam's ouster, the U.S.-led coalition took the top intelligence agents from each of the main opposition parties and trained them in how to turn raw intelligence into targets that could be used in operations, said an Iraqi intelligence expert who participated in the program," Hannah Allam and Warren P. Strobel wrote. An Iraqi official interviewed by the journalists admitted that

the CIA recruited agents from SCIRI, Dawa, the two main Kurdish factions, and two secular Arab parties: the Iraqi National Congress led by Ahmad Chalabi and the Iraqi National Accord led by Ayad Allawi, who later became the interim prime minister. This group, the prototype for an Iraqi intelligence group that represented Iraq's diversity, became CMAD: the Collection, Management and Analysis Directorate.

When the U.S.-led occupation authority ceded power to the semi-sovereign interim government last June, the official said, CMAD was split, with roughly half the agents going to the new interior ministry and the rest to work on military intelligence in the defense ministry. Both ministries' intelligence departments are led by Kurds, the most consistently U.S.-friendly group in Iraq, and report to the Iraqi prime minister.

But an elite corps of CMAD operatives was recruited into the third and most important Iraqi intelligence agency, the secret police force known by its Arabic name: the Mukhabarat. The Mukhabarat's money comes straight from the CIA.

As Wayne Madsen, a researcher and former communications security analyst with the NSA in the 1980s, noted in 2002, the CIA was at that time busy assassinating political enemies around the world at the behest of the Straussian neocons. According to Madsen, the CIA enjoys a "new unbridled authority to assassinate political nuisances to U.S. interests around the world. In Bush's 'New World Order' 'if you're not with us, you're against us,' [and] social activists and progressive political leaders everywhere are now within the crosshairs of the CIA and its local notorious surrogates and warlords. America's traditional concepts of human rights have been relegated to the dustbin of history in post-constitutional corporate statist America."

It would be dangerously naive to believe the CIA does not operate in America (as its charter supposedly mandates). In October, 2002, the Associated Press reported that the "CIA is increasing its presence at FBI field offices by assigning intelligence officers to domestic anti-terrorism teams," an excessively worrisome development considering the snoop and murder agency's track record over the last fifty or so years. Under Operation CHAOS and Project MERRIMAC, the CIA, according to former CIA undercover operative Verne Lyon, "infiltrated agents into domestic groups of all types and activities. It used its contacts with local police departments and their intelligence units to pick up its 'police skills' and began in earnest to pull off burglaries, illegal entries, use of explosives, criminal frame-ups, shared interrogations, and disinformation."

As the history of COINTELRPO reveals, the government not only disrupted and subverted the civil liberties of Americans, but killed more than a few of them as well. "Among the most remarkable of the COINTELPRO revelations are those relating to the FBI's attempts to incite gang warfare and murderous attacks on Black Panther leaders," writes Paul Wolf (COINTELPRO: The Untold American Story). According to Wolf's research and "thousands of pages of documentary evidence," the FBI "utilize[d] private right-wing operatives and terrorists" who conducted "fire-bombings, burglaries, and shootings" against official enemies. In the case of the "American Indian Movement in Pine Ridge, South Dakota, the FBI conducted a full-fledged counterinsurgency war, complete with death squads, disappearances and assassinations, recalling Guatemala in more recent years." It is not encouraging the grand daddy of political assassination, the CIA, is now soundly ensconced in FBI offices and local police departments as well.

In 1975, the lid hiding the activities of the CIA was briefly lifted, revealing all manner of impropriety. Gerald Ford's Commission on CIA Activities Within the United States (also known as the Rockefeller Commission) "looked into all aspects of CIA operations within the United States. Its report, submitted to the President in June 1975, lists the following significant areas of investigation: mail intercepts; Intelligence Community coordination; 'Operation CHAOS' (collecting information on dissidents); protection of the Agency against threats of violence; other investigations by the Office of Security; involvement of the CIA in improper activities for the White House (including Watergate); domestic activities of the Directorate of Operations; domestic activities of the Directorate of Science and Technology; CIA relationships with other federal, state, and local agencies; indices and files on American citizens; and allegations concerning the assassination of President Kennedy. The Commission also looked into the legal authority of the CIA and its internal and external controls." (See U.S. President's Commission on CIA Activities Within the United States: Files, [1947-1974] 1975, located at the Gerald R. Ford Library).

Of course, David Rosenbaum was not a Black Panther nor particularly radical and worked for a newspaper that was staunchly pro-Bush and gung ho in its effort to sell the illegal and immoral invasion and occupation of Iraq to a mostly somnolent American public. Even so, since the advent of COINTELPRO, the political climate in America, under the fascist Straussian neocons, has shifted radically to the reactionary end of the spectrum, parroting in many ways the behavior of previous fascist and authoritarian regimes.

As Operation CHAOS reveals, the CIA has never honored its domestic hands-off charter and it is not a stretch to conclude that it has for some time operated unfettered in America, using the same murderous tactics it has used and continues to use elsewhere in the world at the behest of various presidents and their handlers. In such a highly charged reactionary climate, it is a distinct possibility the neocons have unleashed death squads against American journalists, especially journalists who worked for a corporate media mouthpiece that has recently irked and possibly embarrassed the neocons by running the NSA snoop story, although it can be argued as well that the neocons in fact "leaked" the story as a psychological warfare tactic designed to chill both whistleblowers and investigative journalists who fear the roving eye of Big Brother, Straussian-Machiavellian style.

http://kurtnimmo.com/?p=184

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"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
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Posted: Feb 24 2006, 09:21 PM
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At Least 3 Journalists Slain in New Iraq Violence
By The Associated Press and CNN
Published: February 23, 2006 11:15 AM ET
QUOTE
BAGHDAD Gunmen shot dead 47 civilians and left their bodies in a ditch near Baghdad Thursday as militia battles and sectarian reprisals followed the bombing of a sacred Shiite shrine. Sunni Arabs suspended their participation in talks on a new government.

Three journalists working for Al-Arabiya television, including a prominent TV female correspondent, were found bullet-riddled and dead in Samarra, the site of Wednesday's Askariya mosque attack.

Al-Arabiya is viewed in Iraq as favoring the United States.

At least 47 other bodies were found scattered across Iraq, many of them shot execution-style and dumped in Shiite-dominated parts of Baghdad.

Officials said at least 110 people had been killed across the country in violence believed triggered by the mosque attack.

The bodies of the noted TV correspondent, Atwar Bahjat, and her cameraman and soundman were found early Thursday near the city 60 miles north of Baghdad, local law enforcement officials said.

Bahjat had been reporting live Wednesday from the outskirts of Samarra, which security forces had sealed off after an explosion at a Shiite mosque.

Officials at the Dubai-based satellite news channel said they lost contact with their team after their last broadcast at 6 p.m. Wednesday.

A fourth team member managed to escape from the ambush and told police about the kidnappings. He said two gunmen pulled up in a pickup truck, shooting in the air and shouting: "We want the correspondent," The Associated Press quoted Al-Arabiya as reporting.

"Atwar was in the news van and shouted to the crowd to help her. The crew tried to speak to the gunmen, but they snatched them and took them an unknown location. By this time, night had fallen," Reuters quoted Al-Arabiya's Baghdad correspondent Ahmed al-Saleh as telling viewers.

Saleh said the bodies had been dumped near the town of Dawr near Samarra. All three were Iraqi citizens.

The bullet-riddled bodies were found near their vehicle, cameras and satellite dish, police Capt. Laith Muhammad told AP.

Saleh said Bahjat "is a victim of telling the truth. ... She loved her country and died because of her impartiality."

Al-Arabiya spokesman Jihad Ballout said Bahjat, 26, had joined the channel this year after working for rival Al Jazeera, Reuters reported. She is survived by her mother and sister.

In a statement, the channel said Bahjat was "known for her professional integrity and objectivity."

"Atwar was also the embodiment of non-sectarian harmony -- her father is a Sunni while her mother is a Shia Muslim."

The other two dead were Khaled Mahmoud al-Falahi, 39, and Adnan Khairallah, 36, according to the channel. They were employed by Wasan Media in Iraq and were working for Al-Arabiya at the time.

In its statement, the channel called for authorities to pursue measures to "enhance the safety of journalists active in Iraq" and bring the killers to justice.

"Once again, Al-Arabiya News Channel pays the ultimate price for persistently pursuing the truth," the statement said.

"Until this new tragedy, Al-Arabiya lost a total of eight colleagues in Iraq, five of whom died in a car bomb that targeted Al-Arabiya's bureau in Baghdad, while three lost their lives as a result of U.S. fire.

"Also, Jawad Khathem, Al-Arabiya's reporter in Iraq, was the target of an armed kidnap attempt that resulted in him being paralyzed from the waist down."

More than 60 journalists have been killed in Iraq since the start of the war in 2003, AP reported.

http://www.editorandpublisher.com/eandp/ne...t_id=1002073834




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"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Feb 24 2006, 09:22 PM
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Does anyone know the current status of the CSM journalist that was kidnapped and threatened with death if Iraqi women prisoners were not released from jail?


It looks like we have better records here than AP news.

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"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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