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> First Comet Impact Probe, Set to Launch


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  Posted: Dec 17 2004, 03:43 AM
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And we are the woo-woos... bang.gif

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Thessa

ººººººººººººººººººººººººººººº

QUOTE
Dec. 14, 2004

NASA Set to Launch First Comet Impact Probe

Launch and flight teams are in final preparations for the planned Jan. 12, 2005, liftoff from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., of NASA's Deep Impact spacecraft. The mission is designed for a six-month, one-way, 431 million kilometer (268 million mile) voyage. Deep Impact will deploy a probe that essentially will be "run over" by the nucleus of comet Tempel 1 at approximately 37,000 kph (23,000 mph).

"From central Florida to the surface of a comet in six months is almost instant gratification from a deep space mission viewpoint," said Rick Grammier, Deep Impact project manager at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, Calif. "It is going to be an exciting mission, and we can all witness its culmination together as Deep Impact provides the planet with its first man-made celestial fireworks on our nation's birthday, July 4th," he said.

The fireworks will be courtesy of a 1-by-1-meter (39-by-39 inches) copper-fortified probe. It is designed to obliterate itself, as it excavates a crater possibly large enough to swallow the Roman Coliseum. Before, during and after the demise of this 372-kilogram (820-pound) impactor, a nearby spacecraft will be watching the 6-kilometer (3.7-mile) wide comet nucleus, collecting pictures and data of the event.

"We will be capturing the whole thing on the most powerful camera to fly in deep space," said University of Maryland astronomy professor Dr. Michael A'Hearn, Deep Impact's principal investigator. "We know so little about the structure of cometary nuclei that we need exceptional equipment to ensure that we capture the event, whatever the details of the impact turn out to be," he explained.

Imagery and other data from the Deep Impact cameras will be sent back to Earth through the antennas of the Deep Space Network. But they will not be the only eyes on the prize. NASA's Chandra, Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes will be observing from near-Earth space. Hundreds of miles below, professional and amateur astronomers on Earth will also be able to observe the material flying from the comet's newly formed crater.

Deep Impact will provide a glimpse beneath the surface of a comet, where material and debris from the solar system's formation remain relatively unchanged. Mission scientists are confident the project will answer basic questions about the formation of the solar system, by offering a better look at the nature and composition of the celestial travelers we call comets.

"Understanding conditions that lead to the formation of planets is a goal of NASA's mission of exploration," said Andy Dantzler, acting director of the Solar System division at NASA Headquarters, Washington. "Deep Impact is a bold, innovative and exciting mission which will attempt something never done before to try to uncover clues about our own origins."

With a closing speed of about 37,000 kph (23,000 mph), what of the washing machine-sized impactor and its mountain-sized quarry?

"In the world of science, this is the astronomical equivalent of a 767 airliner running into a mosquito," said Don Yeomans, a Deep Impact mission scientist at JPL. "It simply will not appreciably modify the comet's orbital path. Comet Tempel 1 poses no threat to the Earth now or in the foreseeable future," he added.

Ball Aerospace & Technologies in Boulder, Colo., built NASA's Deep Impact spacecraft. It was shipped to Florida Oct. 17 to begin final preparations for launch. Liftoff is scheduled for no earlier than Jan. 12 at 1:08:20 p.m. EST, with another opportunity 40 minutes later.

Principal Investigator A'Hearn leads the mission from the University of Maryland, College Park. JPL manages the Deep Impact project for the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters. Deep Impact is a mission in NASA's Discovery Program of moderately priced solar system exploration missions.
http://www.nasa.gov/deepimpact




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Posted: Dec 30 2004, 10:45 PM
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Heres another link to add to this thread,interesting reading. http://www.tmgnow.com/repository/cosmology/DeepImpact.html


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Posted: Apr 19 2005, 12:13 PM
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An update on a VERY interesting happening to come...


QUOTE
12.jan 2005
Comet probe Deep Impact launches
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4162869.stm
The Deep Impact spacecraft lifted off from its Florida launch pad aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket.
After achieving a parking orbit in space, the spacecraft was released from the second and third stages of the Delta rocket on its trajectory towards Tempel 1.


user posted image user posted image

And the latest:

QUOTE
29 march 2005
Comet mission's images are blurry
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4391015.stm
Deep Impact - the US space agency (Nasa) mission to crash a projectile into a comet - is returning blurry images from one of its instruments.
But engineers believe they can probably fix the glitch and that the spacecraft itself is in good basic health.

Nasa said test images taken with the High Resolution Instrument (HRI) showed it "has not reached perfect focus".

The probe will eject a 372kg impactor into the path of Comet Tempel 1 to blast a deep hole in its nucleus.

The event will be recorded by cameras and other instruments on the flyby spacecraft, or "mothership.


God knows what will happen 4th of July...


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Posted: May 20 2005, 08:43 AM
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user posted image

Picture taken April 11th:
user posted image

One step closer....
QUOTE
http://deepimpact.jpl.nasa.gov/press/050513jpl.html
DEEP IMPACT MISSION STATUS REPORT
Fifty-nine days before going head-to-head with comet Tempel 1, NASA's Deep Impact spacecraft successfully executed the second trajectory correction maneuver of the mission.

The burn further refined the spacecraft's trajectory, or flight path, and also moved forward the expected time of the Independence Day comet encounter so impact would be visible by ground- and space-based observatories.

The 95-second burn - the longest remaining firing of the spacecraft's motors prior to comet encounter -- was executed on May 4. It changed Deep Impact's speed by 18.2 kilometers per hour (11.3 miles per hour).

"Spacecraft performance has been excellent, and this burn was no different," said Rick Grammier, Deep Impact project manager at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. "It was a textbook maneuver that placed us right on the money."

Right on the money is where Deep Impact has to be to place a 1-meter-long (39-inch) impactor spacecraft in the path of a comet about as big as the island of Manhattan that is bearing down on it at 37,100 kilometers per hour (6.3 miles per second). At the same time, from a very comet-intimate distance of 500 kilometers (310 miles), a flyby spacecraft will be monitoring the event. This all occurs in the wee hours of July 4 - at 1:52 am Eastern time (July 3, 10:52 p.m. Pacific time) -- at a distance of 133.6-million kilometers (83-million miles) from Earth.

"With this maneuver our friends working the Hubble Space Telescope are assured a ringside seat," said Deep Impact Principal Investigator Dr. Michael A'Hearn of the University of Maryland, College Park. "Their observations, along with space telescopes Chandra and Spitzer and numerous ground-based observatories, will provide us with the most scientific bang for our buck with Deep Impact."

Deep Impact is comprised of two parts, a "flyby" spacecraft and a smaller "impactor." The impactor will be released into the comet's path before a planned high-speed collision on July 4. The crater produced by the impact could range in size from the width of a large house up to the size of a football stadium, and from 2 to 14 stories deep. Ice and dust debris will be ejected from the crater, revealing the material beneath.

The Deep Impact spacecraft has four data collectors to observe the effects of the collision. A camera and infrared spectrometer, which comprise the High Resolution Instrument, are carried on the flyby spacecraft, along with a Medium Resolution Instrument. A duplicate of the Medium Resolution Instrument on the impactor will record the vehicle's final moments before it is run over by comet Tempel 1 at a speed of about 37,100 kilometers per hour (23,000 miles per hour).

The overall Deep Impact mission management for this Discovery class program is conducted by the University of Maryland in College Park, Md. Deep Impact project management is handled by JPL. The spacecraft was built for NASA by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation, Boulder, Colo.


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Posted: Jun 2 2005, 10:26 AM
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Oh Nooooo!
theendisnighNEW.gif

QUOTE
Comet Put On List Of Potential Earth Impactors
By David L Chandler
NewScientist.com
6-1-5

A comet has been added to the list of potentially threatening near-Earth objects maintained by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Comet Catalina 2005 JQ5 is the largest - and therefore most potentially devastating - of the 70 objects now being tracked. However, the chances of a collision are very low.
 
The listing of Comet Catalina underscores the uncertainty in the knowledge of whether comets or asteroids pose a greater threat to Earth. Previous estimates of the proportion of the impact risk posed by comets have varied widely, from 1% to 50%, with most recent estimates at the lower end.
 
But comets are larger and faster-moving, on average, so their impacts could be a significant part of the overall risk to human life. And, unlike asteroids, they lie on randomly-oriented and usually highly elongated orbits. This makes them much more likely to remain undiscovered until they are very close to Earth.
 
Comet Catalina was found by the Catalina Sky Survey, one of the six current, large-scale and automated search programmes for near-Earth asteroids. It was initially designated as an asteroid when first spotted on May 6. But was reclassified as a comet when observers saw characteristic fuzziness in the image, indicating ice and dust streaming off.
 
Its size is estimated at 980 metres, but Steve Chesley of JPL told New Scientist that the size determination is based on the assumption it is a dark-bodied asteroid, and so the bright coma of a comet would cause the estimate to be high. "It's really an upper limit," he said.
 
Collision course?
 
On 26 May, JPL's unique orbital calculation software determined that Comet Catalina was on what could possibly be a collision course with Earth, though the odds of such an impact were small: just 1 chance in 300,000 of a strike on June 11, 2085. Based on the 980-metre size estimate, that would produce a 6-gigaton impact - equivalent to 6 billion tonnes of TNT.
 
Astronomers expected the addition of further observations to the calculations to rule out any possibility of a collision, as happens with most newly-seen objects.
 
But that did not quite happen. The comet's predicted pathway actually drew even closer to making a perfect bull's-eye with the Earth - its predicted path passes within 1000 kilometres of where the centre of our 12,700-km-diameter planet will be around at that time.
 
However, uncertainty in the exact timing of the comet's pass through the line of Earth's orbit dropped the odds of an impact to about 1 in 120 million. That is very low, but the observations so far cannot categorically rule a collision out.
 
Forceful outgassing
 
Chesley adds that even the slim 1 in 120 million odds are an overestimate, because comets, unlike asteroids, can move in unpredictable ways because of the forceful outgassing that creates their dusty comas and tails. "The uncertainty is much larger than we're modelling," he said. "But I haven't come up with a good way of dealing with this."
 
The only other comet placed on the JPL list of near-Earth objects with possible collision paths was added in 2003. But additional observations ruled out a possible impact - that comet was removed from the list after less than a week.
 
Just one other comet, Swift-Tuttle, has been recorded with a non-zero possibility of impact. It was rediscovered in 1992 - after more than a century's absence - before the JPL list was created.
 
Additional observations during Swift-Tuttle's passage, thanks to the publicity surrounding the possible impact, made it possible to rule out the possibility of an Earth impact anytime in this millennium. However, Swift-Tuttle is on an orbit that will almost certainly cause it to crash into the Earth or the moon eventually.
 
© Copyright Reed Business Information Ltd.
 
http://www.newscientistspace.com/article/dn7449.html

http://rense.com/general65/dem.htm




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~ Matthew 7:16

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Posted: Jun 10 2005, 02:01 PM
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QUOTE
Close Encounter With Comet Set For Independence Day
By Steve Connor
Science Editor
The Independent - UK
6-9-5

Scientists are preparing to shoot a comet with a self-guided copper missile travelling at 100 times the speed of a bullet.
 
The explosive encounter is set for 4 July - Independence Day in America- and it will be observed by astronomers around the world who hope it will shed light on the origin of the planets.
 
By firing a relatively large object into the icy interior of a comet, scientists hope to dig out and analyse the primordial material that was around when the solar system formed more than four billion years ago.
 
It has taken six months for the £140m Deep Impact probe to travel the 268 million miles from Earth to comet Tempel 1. It will take a further 24 hours for its missile to make the final trip from mother craft to the impact site. Comet Tempel 1 is nearly nine miles long and 2.5 miles wide and scientists insistits course around the Sun will remain unaltered in the collision with the half-ton bullet.
 
The mission is named after the 1998 film in which a former astronaut, played by Robert Duvall, attempts to stop a massive comet colliding with Earth, yet there is no risk of the controlled crash causing a similar collision with Tempel 1, scientists emphasised.
 
The copper block, measuring about 3ft in diameter, will be travelling at 22,700 miles an hour and is expected to knock a hole the size of a football stadium into the comet's surface.
 
Cameras on the projectile will record the event and instruments on the Deep Impact mother ship will analyse the gases and debris from the collision.
 
Michael A'Hearn of the University of Maryland, the mission's principal investigator, said so little was known about the nature of comets that almost any scenario is possible, from the impactor creating a relatively small dent in the comet's surface to causing its total disintegration.
 
"We don't have a clue what's going to happen. My personal estimate [for the crater size] is at the large end of a large-size football stadium, perhaps 150 metres in diameter. It could be larger," Dr A'Hearn said.
 
The copper impactor is, in effect, a battery-powered spacecraft capable of operating independently of the mother spacecraft by making fine adjustments to its flight path as it approaches its moving target. After the impactor is released, the mother ship will makes its closest approach to the comet at the relatively safe distance of 300 miles, close enough to monitor the collision but far enough away to avoid being destroyed.
 
The impact crater should revealmaterial that has remained untouched since the birth of the planets when the solar system formed. "Only the internal material of a comet is unchanged from the beginning of the solar system. But there are no data on the interior, and that's what we're hoping to solve with Deep Impact," Dr A'Hearn said.
 
Comets are considered to be giant "dirty snowballs" of ice and dust and their tails are caused by trails of frozen debris which spew out away from the Sun. Comets could contain so much water in the form of ice that it is possible the Earth's oceans were created by an impact with one or more comets billions of years ago. One of the aims of the mission is to assess the nature and quantity of water that comet Tempel 1 may possess to assess the plausibility of this theory.
 
Tempel 1, discovered by the German astronomer Wilhelm Tempel in 1867, orbits the Sun once every five and a half years.
 
Dust from a comet's nucleus reflects sunlight and generates the cometary tail. Over time, some comets become less active and may even appear dormant. Scientists would like to know whether this is because they exhaust their supply of dust and gas or whether it is sealed inside the inner core.
 
©2005 Independent News & Media (UK) Ltd.
 
http://news.independent.co.uk/world/scienc...sp?story=645333




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Posted: Jun 21 2005, 02:02 PM
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less than 2 weeks to go... bouncefire.gif and counting...

QUOTE
Deep Impact: to the heart of a comet with Europe’s contributionhttp://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMXP52DU8E_index_0.html

21 June 2005
ESA PR 33-2005. On 4 July 2005 at 07:52 CEST (Central European Summer Time) NASA’s Deep Impact mission, launched on 12 January this year, will start exploring a comet's interior by creating a crater with an impactor spacecraft, allowing another spacecraft to look deep inside the comet during a fly-by immediately afterwards.

For the first time the crust and the interior of a comet can be studied. As the material inside the comet's nucleus is pristine, it will reveal new information on the early phases of the Solar System. This is a natural precursor to ESA’s Rosetta cometary mission which seeks to perform the subtler task of orbiting and land on a comet.
The impact will produce a crater the diameter of which is expected to range between a house and a football stadium, and with unknown depth. Ice and dust debris will be ejected from the crater, revealing fresh material beneath. Sunlight reflecting off the ejected material will provide some brightening that will fade as the debris dissipates into space or falls back onto the comet. 

Dramatic images of the impactor spacecraft’s final approach and possibly of the impact itself and the crater will be sent to Earth in near-real time by both spacecraft.

Several observatories in orbit around Earth, and countless Earth-bound telescopes will work in concert for an unprecedented global observation campaign to collect a maximum amount of additional data and information on this event.


ESA will use both its Rosetta comet chaser and the XMM/Newton Observatory to observe the impact. ESA’s 1-metre OGS telescope on Tenerife (Canary Islands , Spain) will also be used for observations from ground. Also the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope will observe the event.

The European Southern Observatory ESO will direct all seven telescopes it operates at the La Silla and Parañal sites in Chile towards the event, amongst them the Earth’s currently most powerful and high-resolving instruments in the infrared and visible wavelength ranges.

Initial data from these European observations will be available on 4 and 5 July beginning a few hours after the impact, enhancing the images and information from the Deep Impact spacecraft itself.

Highlights of the day will be:

4 July

07:15 CEST (05:15 GMT)
ESA TV live event (approx 60 minutes) based on NASA-TV plus studio interviews and inserts. with links to ESO, MPI Lindau (Rosetta), ESA/ ESAC (XMM/Newton) and ESA/ESOC (mission operations).

09:30 CEST (07:30 GMT)
ESA TV update on European observations (approx 20 minutes).

10:00 CEST (08:00 GMT)
NASA media briefing – live rebroadcast by ESA TV (approx 30 minutes).

18:00 CEST (16:00 GMT)
ESA TV update with first Hubble image (black and white) (approx 20 minutes).

20:00 CEST (18:00 GMT)
NASA media briefing – live rebroadcast by ESA TV (approx 30 minutes).
5 July

06:00 CEST (04:00 GMT)
ESA TV update with first ESO colour images

The live portion of the ESA TV production and the NASA Media Briefing (07:15-10:30 CEST) can be witnessed at various ESA centres and elsewhere in Europe: ESA/ESOC in Darmstadt (Germany), ESA/ESTEC in Noordwijk (the Netherlands), ESA/ESRIN in Frascati (Italy), ESA/ESAC in Villafranca (Spain), La Cité de l’Espace in Toulouse (France), ESA Head Office in Paris (France) and Le Parc-aux-Etoiles in Triel-sur-Seine (France), ESO in Garching, Munich (Germany) and PPARC, London, United Kingdom. In most places experts will be available for interviews.

Media representatives wishing to attend the event at any of the centres are kindly requested to fill in the attached accreditation form and return it to the relevant contact person listed for each venue.

(*) ESA Television downlink parameters will be posted at http://television.esa.int, about 72 hours before the event For further information and a daily update of the transmission schedule, visit our website at http://television.esa.int.



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Posted: Jun 28 2005, 01:00 PM
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5 days and counting....



QUOTE

http://www.planetary.org/news/2005/di_timeline_0628.html
June 28, 2005

Comet Tempel 1 and the Deep Impact spacecraft are playing a game of astronomical chicken -- and the Deep Impact impactor is going to lose, big time. But when the impactor is obliterated by Tempel 1 on July 4 at 05:52 UTC (22:52 on July 3, PDT), it will expose the innards of a comet to human eyes for the first time.

The Deep Impact flyby spacecraft will have a ringside seat at the creation of an impact crater on a comet. The images that it captures will give us new insight into the mechanics of cratering, the structure and composition of comets, and perhaps a better understanding of what ingredients were available to make planets, moons, asteroids, and comets when our solar system was being born.

The basic idea behind the Deep Impact mission is simple: send a spacecraft to a comet; shoot a projectile at the comet to make a crater; and watch the crater develop and see what's inside the comet. To make this work, Deep Impact is actually two separate spacecraft. One, the flyby spacecraft, is a fairly traditional, SUV-sized solar-powered craft with a High-Gain Antenna for communicating with the Earth. It also carries two main science instruments, the High-Resolution Imager and the Medium-Resolution Imager, for capturing images, animations, and spectral information about the comet.

The second part of Deep Impact is the Impactor. This is a battery-powered probe, weighing 370 kilograms (816 pounds), with its own camera and a computer that will run an Auto-Navigation program to guide itself into a precise impact with Tempel 1. The impactor will separate from the flyby craft 24 hours prior to the encounter. The impactor will return images to the flyby spacecraft until its demise.

In order to dig a deep hole on Tempel 1, mission planners needed a lot of energy. Explosives would not work, for a wide variety of reasons. Instead, the mission relies on good old-fashioned Newtonian mechanics to deliver the necessary energy. To understand how that works, we need to look at the orbits of Tempel 1 and Deep Impact:


In this diagram, Tempel 1's orbit is blue (light blue above the ecliptic plane, dark below), and Deep Impact's is red (pink above the ecliptic plane, red below). At this scale, the two appear to be on top of each other, though it will still be a few days before they meet.
Map generated using Orbit Viewer applet from Deep Impact Amateur Observers' Program 

Deep Impact and Tempel 1 are both in orbit around the Sun, but they are in two very different orbits. Deep Impact's orbit is a small, nearly circular one with a perihelion (closest distance to the Sun) near Earth's orbit and an aphelion (farthest distance from the Sun) near Mars's orbit. Tempel 1's path is more elliptical. Its perhielion is near Mars's orbit, and its aphelion is near Jupiter's orbit. Because Tempel 1 will be near its perihelion and Deep Impact near its aphelion when the two bodies meet, Tempel 1's velocity relative to the Sun will be far higher than Deep Impact's.

That difference in velocity is what will make the encounter a spectacular event. The two bodies will meet at a relative velocity of 10.3 kilometers per second (23,000 miles per hour). If you recall your high school physics, you'll remember that the energy of such an encounter can be calculated using a formula: the kinetic energy of an object is equal to half the mass times the square of the velocity. So when the 370-kilogram Deep Impact impactor yields up all its kinetic energy in a collision with Tempel 1, the amount of energy available is 19 Gigajoules, which is equivalent to the amount of energy released by exploding 4.8 tons of TNT. Deep Impact needs no explosives -- kinetic energy does all the work.

Here is a detailed timeline of the events that are set to take place as Deep Impact meets Tempel 1.

Spacecraft time (UTC)*
Spacecraft time (PDT)*
Time with respect to impact Event

Jun 26
Jun 26
- 7d Continuous imaging
Days away from the encounter, the nucleus of the comet will still only be a speck to the cameras of Deep Impact. The images' value will be for navigation -- helping to set the parameters for the last trajectory correction maneuver -- and also to watch for jetting or other cometary behaviors.

Jun 29  18:00
Jun 29 11:00
-4d 12h
Optical navigation images acquired every 9 minutes

July 2 23:52
July 2 16:52
-1d 06h Trajectory Correction maneuver
This is the last maneuver Deep Impact will do to line itself up for a collision with Tempel 1 before releasing the impactor. 

July 3 01:52
July 2 18:52
-1d 04h Impactor's battery activated
Until now, the impactor has been relying upon power from the flyby craft. 

July 3 05:52
July 2 22:52
-1d 00h Impactor release
The impactor is sent on its separate way with only a tiny push from the flyby craft. The difference in velocity between the two spacecraft is only 34.8 centimeters per second (0.78 miles per hour).

At this point, the comet's nucleus is not much more than a speck to the cameras, only a few pixels across to the High Resolution Imager.

July 3 06:06
July 2 23:06
-23h 46m First telemetry from impactor after release
Mission workers on Earth will be waiting eagerly to hear that the impactor, on its own for the first time, is healthy.

July 3 06:11
July 2 23:11
-23h 41m Flyby spacecraft deflection maneuver
The flyby spacecraft fires its engines for about 14 minutes to divert its path out of the way of Tempel 1. The burn will slow the spacecraft's speed by 102 meters per second (227 miles per hour). The reduction in speed is necessary in order that the flyby craft can keep the impactor in view during the impact. Its course will eventually take it through the comet's inner coma, a safe 500-kilometer (310-mile) distance from the comet's nucleus,14 minutes after impact.

July 3 06:45
July 2 23:45
-23h 07m First image from flyby spacecraft after deflection maneuver
After sending the impactor on its separate way, the spacecraft will turn to point its two cameras at the comet, capturing color images and spectra of the comet's coma. These data will help scientists nail down the comet's rotation rate, among other things.

July 3 06:50
July 2 23:50
-23h 02m First image of impactor by flyby spacecraft

July 3 07:52
July 3 00:52
-22h 00m First images from impactor; image pairs acquired every 2 hours
The first pair of images from the impactor will be full frames, one with an exposure set to view the nucleus, and one with an exposure set to vuew the much dimmer coma.

July 3 17:52
July 3 10:52
-12h 00m Test run of impactor's final image sequence
Two minutes will be spent running the same imaging sequence that the impactor will run in the final two minutes before its encounter with Tempel 1 in order to verify that the sequence will execute properly. It'll get only one chance!

July 3 19:52
July 3 12:52
-10h 00m Impactor imaging resumes
Image pairs will be captured at the following times:
-10:00; -08:00; -07:00; -06:00; -05:00; -04:00; -03:00; -02:30; -02:00; -01:30; -01:00

July 4 03:52
July 3 20:52
-02h 00m AutoNav system begins imaging
It is up to the impactor's own computer to observe Tempel 1 and choose the best possible impact site. The best site would be fully illuminated by the Sun and relatively smooth in order to reduce the number of variables affecting the outcome of the impact. As part of the autonav function, the impactor captures images of the comet every 15 seconds with its own camera, sending them back to the flyby spacecraft, which relays them on to Earth. The flyby craft is also capturing AutoNav images every 15 seconds in order to improve its own targeting of impact events.

July 4 04:22
July 3 21:22
-01h 30m Impactor Targeting Maneuver 1
This is the first of three thruster firings that the impactor performs to line itself up with Tempel 1. The impactor carries four 22-Newton thrusters, which can fire in pulses varying in length from 0.015 to 0.5 seconds. 

July 4 04:52
July 3 21:52
-01h 00m Pace of impactor imaging accelerates
As the impactor approaches Tempel 1, it will capture images more and more rapdily until it is acquiring pictures every 0.7 seconds.

July 4 05:17
July 3 22:17
-35m 00s Impactor Targeting Maneuver 2

July 4 05:40
July 3 22:40
-12m 30s Impactor Targeting Maneuver 3
This last maneuver sets the final course for the impactor. The impactor is still capturing images and beaming them back to the flyby spacecraft. 

July 4 05:52
July 3 22:52
-00m 10s Dust abrasion may end transmission of impactor images
The Impactor Targeting Sensor is now acquiring images with resolutions as high as 1 meter per pixel. By the final moments, cometary dust will have abraded the camera's optics, degrading the quality of the images, and possibly ending transmission.

July 4 05:52
July 3 22:52
-00m 02s Last possible impactor image
The final image that the impactor could capture and transmit in its entirety to the flyby craft will be captured 2 seconds before impact.

July 4 05:52
July 3 22:52
-0s IMPACT!

Tempel 1 and the impactor try to occupy the same space at the same time. Tempel 1 wins. The impactor is obliterated as the kinetic energy of the impact is released in a blast of light and heat. Telescopes back on Earth, including landbound ones like Mauna Kea, Palomar, and Kitt Peak, and spaceborne ones like Hubble, SWAS, and XMM-Newton, watch for the impact flash. The flyby spacecraft also continues to watch, staying pointed on Tempel 1, as a crater opens and a spray of debris, called ejecta, flies out of the crater.
At the moment of impact, the High Resolution Imager has a resolution of 17 meters per pixel. The images will be panchromatic (black and white) so that they may be captured as rapidly as possible, several per second. Once returned to Earth, the sequence of high-speed images can eventually be assembled into an animation of the impact.

Over the next few hundred seconds, a crater is dug, and a cone-shaped curtain of ejecta spreads out from the crater. How wide and deep the crater becomes, and at how steep an angle the ejecta flies, depend on the properties of the comet, which aren't yet known.

The spacecraft also captures infrared spectra at high speed, searching for the pristine materials that the impact excavates, and mapping out the distribution of different materials within the crater.

July 4 05:59
July 3 22:59
+07m 00s
First image from flyby spacecraft after impact
Although the impact has already happened, the flyby spacecraft has not yet passed its closest approach distance. Four minutes after the impact, the pictures captured by the High Resolution Imager will have a resolution of 12 meters per pixel, and will continue to a highest resolution of 3 meters per pixel. Color imaging takes longer than the rapid black and white imaging performed right around impact, but will allow scientists to map in detail the composition of the interior of the crater. The crater may still be forming on Tempel 1, and ejecta is still flying in all directions.

July 4 06:05
July 3 23:05
+13m 00s
Flyby spacecraft turns to shield attitude
The spacecraft now approaches the inner coma and faces the hazard of dust impacting the sensitive optics and electronics. To prevent any damage, the spacecraft must turn to a direction that will shield the instruments from dust impacts. During this period, the spacecraft continues returning data to Earth.

July 4 06:06
July 3 23:06
+14m 10s
Flyby spacecraft closest approach to Tempel 1
The spacecraft passes within 500 kilometers (300 kilometers) of the comet's nucleus, but the cameras are still protectively pointed away.

July 4 06:36
July 3 23:36
+44m 00s
Flyby spacecraft turns to Tempel 1 and resumes imaging
Safely away from the dusty coma, the flyby spacecraft turns to look back at Tempel 1. The turn will take 9 minutes to complete. The impact site is no longer visible, but the cloud of ejecta is scattered into the space around the comet. The spacecraft captures color images and spectra of the ejecta. As the distance between Tempel 1 and Deep Impact increases, the rate of observations will decrease.

July 5 05:52
July 4 22:52
+01d 00m
End of encounter phase
One day after the encounter, Tempel 1 has diminished to a speck again, and the mission is essentially over. However, the flyby spacecraft may continue to play back data for up to two more days, if bad weather or other glitches on Earth prevents the reception of data earlier. A few more backwards-lookng observations will be performed during this time in order to monitor changes in the comet's activity and look for any large chunks of comet that may have been launched into orbit around the comet nucleus.
Spacecraft time (UTC)* Spacecraft time (PDT)* Time with respect to impact Event
* Note these times are "Earth received time," that is, the time of the event plus the one-way light time between the spacecraft and the Earth, which will be approximately 8 minutes at the time of the mission.

Tempel 1 may be much brighter after the impact, its coma temporarily including all the ejecta. Telescopic observations from Earth -- from both ground-based and orbiting observatories -- will continue long after the impact to watch how the coma evolves.

Many members of the public have expressed concern that by messing with a comet in this fashion, we could place the Earth in danger by sending Tempel 1 toward us. But it's egotistical to think that our tiny little spacecraft could have any such effect on an object the size of Tempel 1. Although Tempel 1 will soon have a new crater, it will otherwise be relatively unaffected by the impact. In particular, its velocity and orbit will hardly have changed. The change in velocty will be about 0.0001 millimeter per second (0.014 inch per hour); the comet's perihelion will be decreased by about 10 meters (33 feet); and its orbital period will be decreased by a fraction of a second. All of these changes will be swamped by the effects of a future close approach between Tempel 1 and Jupiter, which will take place in 2024, changing Tempel 1's perihelion distance by 34 million kilometers (21 million miles).
For better or worse, we're a long way yet from having the ability to deflect a comet toward or away from the Earth. Before we can achieve that, we must first acquire a basic understanding of what comets are made of and how they are put together -- and the Deep Impact mission represents an important step toward that understanding.



But not that close that Jupiter captures it I guess?!


QUOTE

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/deepimpa...hst-062705.html
In a dress rehearsal for the rendezvous between NASA's Deep Impact spacecraft and comet 9P/Tempel 1, the Hubble Space Telescope captured dramatic images of a new jet of dust streaming from the icy comet.
user posted image
The images are a reminder that Tempel 1's icy nucleus, roughly half the size of Manhattan, is dynamic and volatile. Astronomers hope the eruption of dust seen in these observations is a preview of the fireworks that may come July 4, when a probe from the Deep Impact spacecraft will slam into the comet, possibly blasting off material and giving rise to a similar dust plume.

The two images, taken seven hours apart on June 14, show Tempel 1 and its new jet. The image at left, taken at 2:17 a.m. (EDT), is a view of the comet before the outburst. The bright dot is light reflecting from the comet’s nucleus, which appears star-like in these images because it is too small even for Hubble to resolve. The nucleus, a potato-shaped object, is 8.7 miles (14 kilometers) wide and 2.5 miles (4 kilometers) long. Hubble's viewing the nucleus is as difficult as someone trying to spot a potato in Salt Lake City from New York City.

The photo at right, snapped at 9:15 a.m. (EDT), reveals the jet [the bright fan-shaped area]. The jet extends about 1,400 miles (2,200 kilometers), which is roughly half the distance across the U.S. It is pointing in the direction of the Sun.

Image credit: NASA, ESA, P. Feldman (Johns Hopkins University), and H. Weaver (Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Lab)


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Posted: Jul 3 2005, 10:53 AM
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Am I the only person in here following this event?

Anyway... I don't know if I'm expecting something to happen ot not but i think it's very arrogant to blow up a comet like this... (OK the impact-probe is just the size of a washing machine... but though... )

Emperor Kent says this is the site to watch tomorrow... it will be 07:52AM Norwegian time... I will be on my way to work at that time... but I will check it out as soon as I'm online..

http://black-hole-net.mit.csu.edu.au/teles...epimpactcam.asp


user posted image
This image of Deep Impact's impactor probe was taken by the mission's mother ship, or flyby spacecraft, after the two separated at 11:07 p.m. Pacific time, July 2 (2:07 a.m. Eastern time, July 3). The impactor is scheduled to collide with comet Tempel 1 at 10:52 p.m. Pacific time, July 3 (1:52 a.m. Eastern time, July 4). The impactor can be seen at the center of the image.


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Posted: Jul 3 2005, 10:56 AM
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OK...


11 hours and counting...

where to look for the blast:


user posted image


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Posted: Jul 3 2005, 08:35 PM
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Hey Blue Eyed,your not the only one watching,lol. Just set up the telescope,sky looks like it might permit veiwing tonight, hour and a half till impact. Heres the nasa site with the count down, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/deepimpact/main/ satchmo.


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Posted: Jul 7 2005, 03:37 AM
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I saw the impact on tv news.

To me, it looked more like a large asteroid and NOT a comet.

I'll try and post an image soon.

I just got back on after 5 days of being shut out of my domain so it'll take me a while to get up to speed.




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"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Jul 7 2005, 06:15 AM
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Asteroid or Comet?

According to NASA:
6 minutes before impact
user posted image

According to NASA:
5 minutes before impact
user posted image

It looks like a simple image enlargement.

Somethings not right - the whole thing reeks to me.

NASA Image Archive
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/deepimpa..._archive_1.html





--------------------
QUOTE
"Ye shall know them by their fruits"
~ Matthew 7:16

"Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, or who said it, even if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."
~ Buddha
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Posted: Jul 7 2005, 05:12 PM
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Sure looks like an asteroid to me,but then again what do I know? Did'nt get to see the impact with the telescope as a big cloud bank moved in just before impact sadoriginal.gif Such is life. sun.gif satchmo.


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